Definition of attune in English:

attune

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Make receptive or aware.

    ‘a society more attuned to consumerism than ideology’
    ‘the Department is very attuned politically’
    • ‘What he has delivered is a powerful and solid opera, beautifully attuned to the expectations of its audience, challenging but never going too far, involving and magical.’
    • ‘At the same time, he was equipped with a political antenna that was finely attuned to social discontent and class conflict.’
    • ‘We who are attuned to the cycles of Nature and the rhythms of the Earth often feel overwhelmed by the escalating environmental crises.’
    • ‘Therefore, the most successful programs were those that were attuned to the future and flexible enough to respond quickly.’
    • ‘A station that is attuned to your needs, concerns and kind of music.’
    • ‘The Bochum Symphony Orchestra are attuned to these overtly romantic pieces and both soloists are also top class interpreters.’
    • ‘By being attuned to individual students' personal goals, teachers can assist students who otherwise might give up.’
    • ‘Catholic health-care leaders themselves are attuned to the problems these developments pose.’
    • ‘Many editors understood that being more attuned to readers was an important responsibility.’
    • ‘‘Effective managers have to be attuned to what's going on in their departments, but they are not psychotherapists,’ states Kipper.’
    • ‘Stenhammar's art seems far more attuned to the Swedish spirit.’
    • ‘Emotions are also more vulnerable to manipulation by marketers, since they are attuned to respond to novelty, and visual stimulus.’
    • ‘Early learning environments in which teachers are attuned to temperamental differences among children may help to provide a comprehensive basis for the development of skills important for learning.’
    • ‘It was a natural growth for a vital composer who had her ears keenly attuned to new developments, and could selectively integrate what she wanted into her own personal idiom.’
    • ‘Much of Weaver's writing is devoted to the context in which food is grown and eaten, so he is particularly attuned to political contexts.’
    • ‘US politicians are attuned to petroleum's importance to their career prospects.’
    • ‘Health care practitioners who are not attuned to racial differences may not be aware of unique physical conditions as well.’
    • ‘Members were attuned to the political environment and sought what was politically possible.’
    • ‘The 1930s thrillers seem more politically aware and attuned to their times.’
    1. 1.1 Accustom or acclimatize.
      ‘students are not attuned to making decisions’
      • ‘Said Jeff, ‘… I am pretty elderly myself and I do not feel a need for a firearm especially attuned to my aging condition.’’
      • ‘She is much more attuned than I am to the technology.’
      • ‘For the mind is so attuned to the reception of facial signals that almost any combination of two dots and a dash will suffice.’
      • ‘They draw us into another world, their world, to which we must attune and acclimatize ourselves.’
      • ‘This tells us that human beings are exquisitely attuned to interpreting and responding to social signals.’
      • ‘Intelligence tools, furthermore, must be attuned to geographic conditions.’
      • ‘This means education systems and economic structures that are attuned to, and can adapt to, global technological innovations.’
      accustom, adjust, adapt, acclimatize, assimilate, condition, accommodate, tailor
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Make harmonious.
      ‘the interests of East and West are now closely attuned’
      • ‘Professionally, the men are clearly closely attuned.’
      • ‘Although the three were not ideally attuned, they brought a gentle whiff of nostalgia to a season of high-keyed dance.’

Origin

Late 16th century: from at- + tune.

Pronunciation

attune

/əˈtjuːn/