Definition of attraction in English:

attraction

noun

mass noun
  • 1The action or power of evoking interest in or liking for someone or something.

    ‘the timeless attraction of a good tune’
    ‘she has very romantic ideas about sexual attraction’
    • ‘Regardless, it raises interesting questions concerning the ways in which sexual attraction is bound up with aspirations.’
    • ‘Pheromones trigger basic responses, such as sexual attraction.’
    • ‘These can express everything from sexual attraction to intellectual or physical dominance.’
    • ‘The way I feel about her goes way beyond physical attraction.’
    • ‘As human beings we cannot deny our attraction to anything sexual.’
    • ‘In acknowledging its attraction we diminish its power.’
    • ‘Things I want in a relationship: intelligence, physical attraction, reciprocal love.’
    • ‘Although he embraced his sexuality more than the others, physical attraction was lacking.’
    • ‘The attraction of political power is said to have reconciled his alienated parental family.’
    • ‘Men, on the other hand, more frequently replied that sexual attraction was a prime reason for initiating a friendship, and that it could even deepen a friendship.’
    • ‘I'm thinking today about the nature of sexual attraction.’
    • ‘Because of course pheromones, as you probably already know, stimulate sexual attraction.’
    • ‘He had never met the man, but already he could sense his power, his attraction.’
    • ‘We discuss sexual attraction and relationships.’
    • ‘Platonic love is devoid of any physical attraction or sexual interest.’
    • ‘There is no physical contact or obvious sexual attraction in the bath scene.’
    • ‘No, it was probably only baseless physical, sexual attraction.’
    • ‘I did everything in my power to resist his attraction.’
    • ‘This was physical attraction, sexual temptation, nothing more.’
    • ‘The power of attraction will only have a chance to work though, if the other partner is open minded and willing to consider something new.’
    appeal, attractiveness, desirability, seductiveness, seduction, allure, allurement, magnetism, animal magnetism, sexual magnetism, charisma, charm, beauty, good looks, glamour, magic, spell
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1count noun A quality or feature that evokes interest, liking, or desire.
      ‘this reform has many attractions for those on the left’
      • ‘The lake's attractions for anglers was of significant economic importance to the Bangor area.’
      • ‘He believes colour and convenience are the main attractions for beginner or novice gardeners buying plants.’
      • ‘Reading a book damages the spine, which reduces its attractions for potential buyers.’
      • ‘Within the village itself, there are other attractions for those keen on immersing themselves in local history.’
      • ‘Future gains are likely to be more sedate although the shares have their attractions for those seeking some stability.’
      • ‘One of the main attractions for users to have mobile phones is that they offer the ability to roam and to make telephone calls from almost anywhere.’
      • ‘Are there specific features, attractions, or wildlife that you were hoping to see?’
      • ‘But you can see the attractions for the international high flyer.’
      • ‘These social technologies have attractions for the writer and journalist.’
      • ‘The airfield is one of the main attractions for the current residents - often bankers and businessmen who fly in from abroad for the weekend.’
      • ‘We have a wide range of attractions for all ages and we are grateful to all the Friends for their help in organising the event.’
      • ‘The quality of the workforce is one of the attractions for entrepreneurs and investors in the Paisley area.’
      • ‘The library has special attractions for children and young people could find no better pastime than reading.’
      • ‘Being part of a community is one of the biggest attractions for new crofters.’
      • ‘One of the attractions for companies and groups is the range of activities available.’
      • ‘Face painting was one of the many attractions for the children.’
      • ‘The beaches here are perfect for family and children as they offer fabulous attractions for all.’
      • ‘The region has a number of attractions for potential investors.’
      • ‘But the beauty of the scenery and the charm of Thai culture are unlikely to hold any attractions for them now.’
      • ‘The supplier of financial information has two main attractions for private investors.’
    2. 1.2count noun A place which draws visitors by providing something of interest or pleasure.
      ‘the church is the town's main tourist attraction’
      • ‘Sligo Folk Park is the latest regional visitor and tourist attraction in the County.’
      • ‘Mr Simpson said they had tried to work with the park, as one of the county's main tourist attractions, while preserving the character of the area.’
      • ‘Knock Museum continues to be a popular attraction for many visitors to the area.’
      • ‘The province was a tourist attraction and the home area of many political and business leaders.’
      • ‘The medieval village of Carcassonne is one of the best visitor attractions in the region and is not to be missed.’
      • ‘Because York is such a large tourist attraction for continental visitors, will traders be able to afford not to accept the euro as payment?’
      • ‘Those bold moves helped to revitalise the city as a visitor attraction and shopping centre, and many other towns and cities followed suit.’
      • ‘The road is also an important local road, providing a link to Manchester Airport and tourist attractions like Tatton Park.’
      • ‘This is supposed to be a site of beauty and a tourist attraction.’
      • ‘In reaching the agreement the council will encourage the ‘environmentally sensitive’ development of the farm as a tourist attraction.’
      • ‘There are ambitious plans for the future and the entire park, when fully developed, will be a tourist attraction for locals and visitors alike.’
      • ‘The main attractions for the tourists are the casinos and their free shows.’
      • ‘In many towns and villages, such a house acts not only as a place to live, but also as a tourist attraction, bringing visitors in their droves.’
      • ‘Promoting the town as a tourist attraction is to be one of the council's main objectives over the next 12 months.’
      • ‘Other attractions for history buffs include the Palace of the Nawab.’
      • ‘His home town has been turned into a tourist attraction, with a museum to celebrate his career.’
      entertainment, activity, diversion, interest, feature, crowd-pleaser
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    3. 1.3Physics A force under the influence of which objects tend to move towards each other.
      ‘gravitational attraction’
      • ‘He attributed gravitation to the forces of mutual attraction between material objects.’
      • ‘As its name suggests, this is a powerful force of attraction that operates between all protons and neutrons.’
      • ‘Black holes are objects for which the gravitational attraction is so strong that nothing, not even light, can escape from it.’
      • ‘As an exercise you might try computing the electrostatic attraction between an electron and a proton and compare it with the gravitational attraction.’
      • ‘The forces of attraction between ions in an ionic compound are very strong.’
      • ‘The electrical attraction between a proton and an electron is forty powers of ten stronger than their gravitational attraction.’
      • ‘Gravitational forces of attraction always exist between two objects of any mass, but it takes an object as large as a planet for this force to become noticeable.’
      • ‘In science, Newton's laws for falling objects were based on the concept of gravitational attraction.’
      • ‘Of course, while atoms interact via well defined forces of attraction and repulsion, people are seldom so straightforward.’
      • ‘The energy of attraction between protons and neutrons is about a million times greater than the chemical binding energy between atoms.’
      • ‘This electrostatic attraction, called an ionic bond, is much weaker than a covalent bond of shared electrons.’
      • ‘But gravitational attraction depends on distance and mass.’
      • ‘The second force, which balances the gravitational attraction, is known as the centripetal force.’
      • ‘The gravitational attraction between the two might follow a force law that differs from Newton's law of gravity.’
      pull, draw
      View synonyms
    4. 1.4Grammar The influence exerted by one word on another which causes it to change to an incorrect form, e.g. the wages of sin is (for are) death.

Origin

Late Middle English (denoting the action of a poultice in drawing matter from the tissues): from Latin attractio(n-), from the verb attrahere (see attract).

Pronunciation

attraction

/əˈtrakʃ(ə)n/