Definition of attract in English:

attract

verb

[with object]
  • 1Cause to come to a place or participate in a venture by offering something of interest or advantage.

    ‘a campaign to attract more visitors to Shetland’
    ‘he hoped this strategy would attract foreign investment by multinationals’
    • ‘China has no trouble generating income, and it has become more and more skilled at attracting foreign investment.’
    • ‘The event attracts an estimated 10000 visitors.’
    • ‘The federal government has long shown no interest in attracting foreign factories to its shores.’
    • ‘Some of these companies have attracted high profile venture capital funding.’
    • ‘And Britain continues to lead its Continental rivals in attracting foreign investment.’
    • ‘The Lake District attracts thousands of foreign visitors each year.’
    • ‘The other approach is to attract foreign investment, which brings technology with it.’
    • ‘If New Zealand wants to progress and prosper, we must attract foreign investment to this country.’
    • ‘By day the city is charm itself, attracting thousands of visitors who revel in its beauty, history and shops.’
    • ‘Ireland's success in attracting foreign investment is largely because of its low corporation tax rates.’
    • ‘His government has set ambitious targets for economic reform and attracting foreign investment.’
    • ‘The venture had failed to attract enough private funding.’
    • ‘He will also be responsible for attracting new venture capital activities into Scotland.’
    • ‘The funding will go towards attracting and training more health professionals for country areas.’
    • ‘Scotland has had tremendous success in the past in attracting investment by foreign firms looking for a foothold in Europe.’
    • ‘It was following that announcement that the city council and its partners launched a strategy to attract inward investment.’
    • ‘Frogs and newts have already been attracted to three new natural spring ponds at Abbey Meads School.’
    • ‘The lake attracts thousands of visitors every year.’
    • ‘This year the race has attracted sponsorship from several sources, including Norwich Union Healthcare.’
    • ‘The museum is a giant step towards attracting tourism, and is gradually accomplishing this goal.’
    1. 1.1 Evoke (a specified reaction)
      ‘I did not want to attract attention’
      ‘his criticism of the government attracted widespread support’
      • ‘A combined project is more likely to attract senior management attention and support.’
      • ‘Today's call for a weekly farmers' market in York is likely to attract widespread support.’
      • ‘His interim report attracted much attention for the wrong reason.’
      • ‘It is large enough to be conspicuous, and as it attracts attention, it also attracts speculation.’
      • ‘Pandit Ravi Shankar, apart from being one of India's finest musicians, also attracts much media attention.’
      • ‘I'm always trying to find a first line that attracts attention, that pulls the reader in.’
      • ‘Bling is described as ‘jewellery which attracts attention because it is big and expensive.’’
      • ‘Each year the exhibition attracts widespread media attention.’
      • ‘His striking hair often attracts the attention of the ladies.’
      • ‘The use of effective language on a resume will attract the attention of an employer.’
      • ‘Then again, nothing attracts support more effectively than excellence.’
      • ‘The statue immediately attracts the viewer's attention.’
      • ‘The good results have attracted a lot of attention from educationists.’
      • ‘A lot of its activities either break even or lose money in order to attract visitor interest here.’
      • ‘Now, after three nights of music, the reaction from patrons has been superb and the music is attracting the attention of music lovers from all over.’
      • ‘While unable to stop the bill, he succeeded in attracting widespread attention to his cause.’
      • ‘Still, the nascent industry is attracting the interest of venture capitalists.’
      • ‘The police report has attracted widespread media attention in Texas over the last couple of days.’
      • ‘A terrible disaster like this attracts massive attention, on rolling television news stations and the Internet as well as in newspapers.’
      • ‘The blunt message attracted a mixed reaction.’
      • ‘The project is attracting widespread support.’
    2. 1.2 Cause (someone) to have a liking for or interest in something.
      ‘I was attracted to the idea of working for a ballet company’
      • ‘In terms of imagery I am really attracted to the intricacies of weaving.’
      • ‘A crisis in the supply of teachers is looming as fewer university students are attracted to the profession.’
      • ‘I'm attracted to all kinds of writing, from Mark Twain to Jean Genet.’
      • ‘Remember that writers are attracted to people and places with interesting names.’
      • ‘I think people are attracted to the humour and nostalgia that he portrays.’
      • ‘Research reaches his desk warning that young people are not attracted to a career in business.’
      • ‘Is it any wonder that young people are not attracted to the game in great numbers?’
      • ‘I think that often I'm attracted to stories where something has to be revealed.’
      • ‘As he came of age, the young man displayed little interest in the family business but was attracted to art and literature.’
      • ‘I found myself wondering why so many people are attracted to the city.’
      • ‘This is a very powerful argument, and one that I was attracted to for some time.’
      • ‘She is clearly not part of the system and people are attracted to her vulnerability.’
      • ‘People are attracted to the simplicity and intimacy; they know what to expect and are not disappointed.’
      • ‘Beyond that, people are attracted to lighthouses as a symbol of hope or truth.’
      • ‘The detailed design of certain areas of the building is part of the reason people are attracted to it.’
      • ‘Young people are attracted to drugs and the drug culture because of the fun and the thrills.’
      • ‘He was initially attracted to painting, which was to remain one of his passions.’
      • ‘Possibly this explains why so many young people are attracted to these kinds of movements.’
      • ‘However, his interest in medicine was not great and he was instead attracted to mathematics.’
      • ‘That is not to deny that people are attracted to New York for good economic reasons.’
      entice, allure, lure, tempt, charm, win over, woo, engage, enchant, entrance, mesmerize, hypnotize, spellbind, captivate, beguile, bewitch, seduce, dazzle, tantalize, inveigle, lead on
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3be attracted to Have a sexual or romantic interest in.
      ‘I am not attracted to him at all’
      • ‘She was the perfect example of the sort of woman I am automatically attracted to.’
      • ‘I had seen the way she behaved when she found someone she was attracted to, she was a predator.’
      • ‘Someone may be attracted to you and express interest in furthering your relationship.’
      • ‘That men should be attracted to more fertile women makes sense from an evolutionary perspective.’
      • ‘Since she flirted with everyone and undoubtedly had a seductive personality, he was probably attracted to her.’
      • ‘My own interpretation would be that basically, you're either attracted to a specific person or you're not.’
      • ‘I was attracted to two people at the same time,’
      • ‘Especially when I've been attracted to three different guys in the past year.’
      • ‘He knows Sarah would do anything to get her hands on someone she is attracted to.’
      • ‘Pay close attention to the different types of potential lovers, and partners you have been attracted to in the past.’
      • ‘He is attracted to Lena's beauty and charms.’
      • ‘He wasn't someone she would normally be attracted to - he was a little too domineering.’
      • ‘And frankly, it makes me wonder why you were attracted to GD in the first place.’
      • ‘He's constantly attracted to other women, but I don't think he sleeps around.’
      • ‘I know I can't change what type of women my husband is attracted to, but how can I learn to live with this?’
      • ‘He was different from the typical guy that I was attracted to, but that was part of the attraction.’
      • ‘I hate being short and to top it off, I have a penchant for being attracted to very tall men.’
      • ‘If you radiate a sense of fun, humor, and happiness, your date will be attracted to that and want to see you again.’
      • ‘He was the first man she'd been attracted to who was also a good friend and that in itself made him dear to her.’
      • ‘There had been at least one boy interested in her; but she hadn't been attracted to him.’
      • ‘Now my problem is I'm not the type of guy these women seem to be attracted to.’
      worship, adore, love, cherish, dote on, be enamoured of, be infatuated with, be taken with, be attracted to, find attractive
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    4. 1.4 Exert a force on (an object) that is directed towards the source of the force.
      ‘the negatively charged ions attract particles of dust’
      • ‘The ‘weight’ of an object normally means the force that Earth attracts it with.’
      • ‘The cloths are designed to create a static charge which attracts dust and bacteria and holds dirt until they are washed.’
      • ‘Magnetic interactions can also play an important role in attracting electrons to each other.’
      • ‘An electronic cleaner produces negative ions that are attracted to the pollutants.’
      • ‘He also noted that the force attracting two objects increased or decreased in a ratio of their combined sizes or mass.’
      • ‘This happens because the massive black hole gravitationally attracts any matter lurking near it and never lets it go.’
      • ‘Electronegativity is a way to measure how much an atom attracts electrons in a chemical bond.’
      • ‘The moon attracts every piece of matter on earth.’
      • ‘Locally, there is a large amount of gas and dust attracted by the black hole's gravity.’
      • ‘Computers cause static electricity and so attract dust and bacteria.’
      • ‘This is consistent with the fact that matter attracts matter through the gravitational force.’
      • ‘Because it has a tacky surface, it attracts dust, which reduces its reflectivity somewhat.’
      • ‘The magnetic field attracts metal objects.’
      • ‘The two ions of opposite charge attract each other and an ionic bond is formed.’
      • ‘The strong force also attracts protons to protons or neutrons to neutrons.’
      • ‘The positive ions are attracted to the negative electrode and vice versa.’
      • ‘A positively charged object attracts a negatively charged one and vice versa.’
      • ‘The ellipsis is a black hole: a void that attracts everything towards itself.’
      • ‘The negative charge of the oxygen attracts the positively charged hydrogen ions through the membrane.’
      • ‘Electronegativity refers to the ability of an atom in a compound to attract electrons.’
      draw, pull, magnetize
      View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin attract- ‘drawn near’, from the verb attrahere, from ad- ‘to’ + trahere ‘draw’.

Pronunciation

attract

/əˈtrakt/