Main definitions of Ashanti in English

: Ashanti1Ashanti2

Ashanti1

(also Asante)

proper noun

  • A region of central Ghana. It was annexed by Britain in 1902, becoming part of the former British colony of the Gold Coast.

Pronunciation:

Ashanti

/əˈʃanti/

Main definitions of Ashanti in English

: Ashanti1Ashanti2

Ashanti2

(also Asante)

noun

  • 1A member of a people of south central Ghana.

    • ‘Among the ethnic groups or regions selected to exemplify these roles are the Asante, Kuba, Fante, Benin kingdom, Okpella, Isoko, Baule, Igbo, Fon, and Lamu Island.’
    • ‘For the Asante, the people most closely associated with kente, the cloth shifts from being a marker of class and regional origins to serving as ritual costume, nationalist statement, and marketing device.’
    • ‘As the power of the forts grew, southern coastal peoples like the Asante built ever stronger relations with the European traders, establishing themselves as middlemen between the Europeans and the peoples of the north.’
    • ‘The war was eventually lost, and Asante was annexed, but the Asante claimed victory, because they never lost possession of the sacred stool.’
    • ‘This exploratory ethnobotanical study took place in Kumasi, the capital city of the Asante, one of the Akan tribes.’
    • ‘I don't really think that there have been any Arabs or Ashanti for many decades who wouldn't recognise a pair of trousers.’
    • ‘Over the last few centuries, Akan people - relatives of the Ashanti - moved in from the kingdoms to the east, while others trickled in from what is now Liberia in the west.’
    • ‘What cultures are silenced or muted by the primacy of an Asante / Ewe national symbol?’
    • ‘Now, he's in the final again and no matter what the semi-final scores say, all eyes are on the Ashanti.’
    • ‘She bases this claim on an obscure source on the Ashanti, as if what the latter do is typical of all West African weaving.’
    • ‘The Asante's maize-fed army expanded tribal reach into neighboring savannahs, adapting floury maize to the drier climate.’
    • ‘When the Ashanti resisted, another British expedition finally destroyed the empire, which became a British crown colony in 1902.’
    • ‘The Fante teasingly refer to the Asante as ‘bush people.’’
    • ‘Thus, in an attempt to appeal for the support of the Asante, the silver jubilee celebration became a national affair that was commemorated on stamps.’
    • ‘Writers on the Asante, including the anthropologist Alex Kyerematen, have long regarded seats as pivotal to the domestic, ceremonial, and ritual life of what was once the most powerful state in Ghana.’
    • ‘The British government appointed Garnet Wolseley, a major general in the British Army, as administrator and commander in chief of the region and gave him orders to drive the Ashanti out.’
    • ‘The Asante, Ewe, Fon and Fante peoples provided the bulk of imports into Barbados.’
    • ‘A sudden international demand for sugar allowed Jamaica to grow rich and powerful as more and more slaves, mainly Fante, Ashanti, Ibo and Yoruba people, were imported to the island to expand the plantations.’
    • ‘On 22 January 1824 the Ashanti had a stunning victory in the battle of Nsamankow.’
    • ‘In 1807 the Asante occupied Fanti coastal territory.’
  • 2[mass noun] The dialect of Akan spoken by the Ashanti.

adjective

  • Relating to the Ashanti or their language.

    • ‘Stamped adinkra, machine-embroidered or appliqued akunitan, brocade, and other forms may not have achieved kente's iconic status, yet each has its own role to play in the constellation of Asante arts of power and prestige.’
    • ‘He represented the old guard and also appealed to Ashanti nationalism.’
    • ‘Most ethnic groups make big efforts at funerals, but Ashanti funerals are the most elaborate and expensive.’
    • ‘Sometimes it had nothing to do with Mona at all - rather it was the loneliness of an Ashanti accent that the other children mimicked, giggling, or the emptiness of a lunch table where no one would sit with her.’
    • ‘In 1981 the Museum staged an exhibition of Ashanti life in the then Museum of Mankind.’
    • ‘In 1999, the Ashanti gold mining company nearly went bankrupt after a gold price rally because of its hedging position.’
    • ‘He admires Asante civilisation, but recognises that this kingdom succeeded in remaining independent for so long because it sold slaves in return for European guns.’
    • ‘More than 100 years old, these drums are one of many artifacts that embody the spirits of Asante culture.’
    • ‘As Peter Selz notes in this book, Chase-Riboud's sculpture has as much to do with the sculpture of Bernini as with African masks and Asante combs.’
    • ‘Thus, a full-page photograph of a gold ring cast from a peanut begins the chapter on Asante regalia.’
    • ‘Locally made Golden Tree chocolate, wrapped in sparkling aluminum and tempting red paper, it tasted of freshly crushed cocoa beans picked in Asante land.’
    • ‘Four of the staffs are by the important Asante carver Osei Bonsu.’
    • ‘He curated the acclaimed ‘Africa’ show at the Academy in 1995, as a result of his passion for collecting Ashanti sculpture and his scholarly interest in African art.’
    • ‘The Wilson sculpture, on the other hand, is a wholly nonutilitarian rendering of an Asante stool.’
    • ‘These restorations would likely aim to give a sense of Ashanti culture, in particular of the way in which a turn-of-the-century royal Asantehene lived.’
    • ‘Recently I received a gift catalogue in the mail that offers Ashanti masks, Moroccan drum furniture, Bhutanese vests, Punjabi purses, Balinese clothes hooks, cabinets topped with Buddha sculptures, and Feng Shui soaps.’

Origin

The name in Akan.

Pronunciation:

Ashanti

/əˈʃanti/