Main definitions of ash in English

: ash1ash2

ash1

noun

  • 1[mass noun] The powdery residue left after the burning of a substance.

    before noun ‘cigarette ash’
    ‘I turned over the ashes’
    • ‘Rubbing cigarette ashes, powdered pumice, or a piece of walnut into spots may also help remove them.’
    • ‘With his legs finally free, he climbed out of the hole, dropping cigarette ash onto the debris.’
    • ‘Deep growls and explosions thundered through the air as clouds of black volcanic ash coated the surroundings.’
    • ‘The volcano is active and tourists flock to see the nightly fireworks display of showers of burning ash and flaming boulders and to hear the mountain rumble and roar.’
    • ‘The most fertile land is in the Pacific coast region, where volcanic ash has fertilized the soil.’
    • ‘They cleaned the huge brass vessels and plates with ash, sand and coconut husk.’
    • ‘The three African generals sat around a table, tipping cigarette ash into a marble tray and tutting about the revolution going on outside.’
    • ‘The landscape here is still a vast area of grey brown covered mostly with volcanic ash, dust and rock (a pumice plain).’
    • ‘This time, he helped save a $20-million building and the immeasurable grief of replacing yet another school burned to ashes.’
    • ‘A layer of volcanic ash and dust seems to have protected the ice from subliming away, the researcher said.’
    • ‘Haley took another drag of her cigarette before tapping the ashes into her empty tea cup.’
    • ‘He looked over at her, raising his eyebrow, tapping his cigarette and sending burning ashes into the air.’
    • ‘Jack's crumpled white shirt was rolled up around his elbows and his black pants were littered with cigarette ash.’
    • ‘A floor so clean you could sprawl on it without having to coat yourself in spilled booze or cigarette ash.’
    • ‘Along with natural stone, they often used a form of concrete made from volcanic ash and lime.’
    • ‘The other gods were dusty with what looked like incense ash or vibhuti powder.’
    • ‘The ashes are made by burning palm fronds from the previous year's Palm Sunday and getting 'em blessed by someone with the proper credentials.’
    • ‘In my opinion, the oath should be burned to ashes.’
    • ‘Everything was burned to ashes, and people were left utterly dazed.’
    cinders, ashes, embers, clinker
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1The remains of a human body after cremation or burning.
      ‘his ashes were scattered on the waters of the Ganges River’
      • ‘Adrienne was cremated and her ashes were scattered about the mountain, taken by the wind.’
      • ‘Interment of ashes took place in Ballinrobe cemetery.’
      • ‘Buddha's ashes were distributed all over the country and Stupas were built for them.’
      • ‘Normally, the entire body gets burnt to ashes in one-and-a-half hours.’
      • ‘Plots can contain the memorial stones and ashes of several generations, each ancestor bearing a new name bestowed by priests for the afterlife.’
      • ‘Many parents choose cremation because they can take their baby's ashes home or distribute them at a location that has some meaning to them.’
      • ‘For eight years Mandy Sutcliffe visited a remembrance garden to pay her respects to her mother, father and sister whose ashes she believed had been scattered on a special family plot.’
      • ‘Two months after the Staff of Energy was destroyed, Will's body was burned into ashes and thrown into the Atlantic Ocean.’
      • ‘It would only be a matter of seconds before the man's body was completely burned, but it would take a while before his entire body would burn to ashes.’
      • ‘A private ash interment will be held at a later date.’
      • ‘A funeral director later identified the substance as human ashes.’
      • ‘When my mother died, we took her ashes out into the ocean to the same spot where we had scattered my fathers ashes a few years earlier.’
      • ‘When he was dying, he told his family to spread half of his ashes on the mystic mountains and the lake in China he had called home for so many years.’
      • ‘He is part of the team investigating what is happening to the growing volume of human ashes now removed from crematoria.’
      • ‘The method contrasts very sharply with the unpopular cremation, the burning of the remains to ashes, which is accepted even by the Christian church.’
      • ‘Only ashes remained, no bodies for him to burn properly to give peace to his parents' souls.’
      • ‘In fact, if someone is cremated, having died in the mountains or elsewhere, it is far more fitting to scatter the ashes from a mountain top or at a spot beloved of the deceased.’
      • ‘Cremation to follow and a private family interment of ashes to take place at a later date.’
      • ‘Days later we took Doug's ashes into the mountains, spreading them in view of both Shuksan and Baker.’
      • ‘After an autopsy, he plans to have his wife's body cremated and her ashes brought to Pennsylvania, where she grew up.’
    2. 1.2The mineral component of an organic substance, as assessed from the residue left after burning.
      ‘coal contains higher levels of ash than premium fuels’
      • ‘Wheat plants grown in limed and nonlimed soil fertilized with poultry ash or potassium phosphate produced similar yields.’
      • ‘Fly ash is a waste ash produced from burning coal in electric power plants.’
      • ‘Fire can also aid bog formation as particles of ash and carbon deposited into the soil profile can reduce drainage and therefore initiate peat growth.’
      • ‘The ash residue from the burning of hazardous waste is itself highly toxic.’
      • ‘The ash contains calcium and phosphorous essential to healthy milk.’
      • ‘The burning cellulose drips and leaves a hard ash.’
      • ‘As the brine is pumped out, the mines will be filled with a million tonnes of grout - made from the pulverised fuel ash, salt and cement.’
      • ‘Banana sap can be used as a dye, and banana ash is used in making soap.’
      • ‘Soap was first made by boiling goat fat, water, and ash high in potassium carbonate.’
      • ‘All the waste is used completely as the small amount of ash residue; which is inert, can be used in by-products.’
      • ‘He visited a £32m project to stabilise mines under the town by pumping them full of a mixture of fuel ash and cement.’
      • ‘As in Edgefield, potters at Guadalupe initially used alkaline, or ash, glazes.’
      • ‘It mixes manure with recycled materials like cement or lime kiln dust, coal ash from electric power plants, and gypsum.’
      • ‘Minerals from the ash and the silicon-rich water replaced the trees' organic material and, over the eons, assumed their form as quartz.’
      • ‘In addition, low quality coals can have a very high ash content which results in problems of residual ash disposal and associated heavy metal leaching.’
      • ‘Grain and hay samples were analyzed for DM, ash, and soluble protein.’
      • ‘They include such materials as soil, sand, rice flour, ash, white cement, charcoal or pigment, rubbed onto paper or canvas.’
      • ‘Faience is a glass-like material, made by heating a paste consisting of sand or crushed quartz, an alkali such as plant ash, and a glaze, until vitrification occurs.’
      • ‘It combusts perfectly, leaving no residue, no ash.’
      • ‘The ash of the fruit and the bark, when boiled in oil, are used in making soaps.’
  • 2A trophy for the winner of a series of Test matches in a cricket season between England and Australia.

Origin

Old English æsce, aexe, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch as and German Asche.

Pronunciation:

ash

/aʃ/

Main definitions of ash in English

: ash1ash2

ash2

noun

  • 1A tree with compound leaves, winged fruits, and hard pale timber, widely distributed throughout north temperate regions.

    • ‘Root competition from the huge tulip poplars, ashes, and sweet gum trees contributes significantly to the parched soil conditions.’
    • ‘Creon stood up and leaned against the ash tree and folded his arms.’
    • ‘In 1980, an old ash tree in Cumbria on which this lichen grew, had to be felled for safety reasons.’
    • ‘It is arguable whether or not the name is referring to the ash tree or the remains of a fire.’
    • ‘The newly planted trees include oak, ash, Scots pine, yew, birch and alder.’
    • ‘Forestry is also important, with a third of the land covered by birch, pine and fir in the north and oak, ash, beech and maple farther south.’
    • ‘A tall ash tree stood out from the rest of the trees that lined the crumbling brick wall, letters carved deeply into the trunk.’
    • ‘Then, I was grasped by my shoulders and shoved against a thick post that had once been an ash tree.’
    • ‘Geo pulled out his great lance, made out of the strongest ash tree and bound in silver and pale green gems.’
    • ‘The first thing we saw when we hit the woods was an ice-cream sign nailed to an ash tree.’
    • ‘The sculpture called Seminal is carved out of an ash tree trunk.’
    • ‘The hazelnut tree is associated with fertility while the ash tree carries with it the notion of barrenness.’
    • ‘The woods most often used for balsamic include chestnut, ash tree, cherry, mulberry, juniper and oak.’
    • ‘They planted oaks, poplars, cork oaks, pines, chestnuts, candle pines, ashes, willows and many other trees.’
    • ‘An ash tree produces more and more branches as time passes.’
    • ‘The legendary ash tree of Scandinavia, Yggdrasil, forms the basis of Norse mythology.’
    • ‘Of the most popular timbers maple is the hardest, with ash, beech, oak and cherry following respectively.’
    • ‘About fifty yards ahead there was a thrush sitting high and singing innocently in an ash tree that overhung the road.’
    • ‘Part of the continuing work was to reduce the size of the ash tree outside my study window, which is drinking too much water from the ground.’
    • ‘In the topmost branches of a wonderful ash tree nestles a beautiful room with glass walls.’
    1. 1.1[mass noun]The hard pale wood of the ash tree.
      • ‘The best wooden cutting boards are made from hard woods like oak, ash, and maple.’
      • ‘All products are made of three types of wood: ash from the US, beech from Germany and sapele from Africa.’
      • ‘Usually they were made of pine, though occasionally they were made of ash or poplar.’
      • ‘The kitchen's mahogany, ash, and aluminum are carried into the living room, where they're composed as a painterly fireplace wall.’
      • ‘Alternatively, for a clean, elegant look, go for hand-made hardwood kitchens in pale maple or ash.’
      • ‘A pine plotting board and two pairs of dividers in their ash wood case were found nearby.’
      • ‘Previous competitions also used poles made out of ash wood which was not flexible, and athletes would sort of climb up the pole as they jumped.’
      • ‘The internal finishes are impressive, with features such as larch, ash, deal and slate floors and hardwood doubleglazed windows.’
      • ‘Then there are her unusual wall sculptures made from ash wood, which she says bring a ‘natural presence’ to the home.’
      • ‘Timberyards in the British Isles would have contained indigenous woods like oak, ash, elm, sycamore and beech.’
      • ‘My favourite woods are yew and ash, but I enjoy working with any wood.’
      • ‘Look for wooden handles made out of ash or hickory wood.’
      • ‘The shaft of long handled tools should be a light wood, such as ash, and should be unpainted and free of knots.’
      • ‘It was almost a foot long, made of ash wood with beautiful engravings of seagulls and sailor knots and braided ropes on it.’
      • ‘The traditional handle material is northern hardwood - usually ash, sometimes hickory.’
      • ‘He uses ash to craft garden chairs, because of the wood's flexibility.’
      • ‘Using thorn, apple and pear woods for heads and ash for the shafts, Philip mastered his craft, revolutionising play with shapes that, literally, broke the mould.’
      • ‘We heard the rhythmic pounding as the spear points were hammered onto shafts of ash wood.’
      • ‘In keeping with the luxuriously modern interior, floors are finished in ash wood throughout, enhancing the feeling of space and light.’
      • ‘The neatly folded scented bed sheets and the four-poster bed made of ash wood had this annoying elegance, which seems to be mocking at her frustration.’
    2. 1.2Used in names of trees unrelated to the ash but with similar leaves, e.g. mountain ash.
      • ‘Brilliant bigtooth maple, velvet ash, and box elder leaves float on mirror-smooth pools and stick to hiking boots.’
  • 2An Old English runic letter, ᚫ, a vowel intermediate between a and e. It is represented in the Roman alphabet by the symbol æ or Æ (see also Æ).

    Æ

Origin

Old English æsc, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch es and German Esche.

Pronunciation:

ash

/aʃ/

Main definitions of ash in English

: ash1ash2

ASH

  • (in the UK) Action on Smoking and Health.

Pronunciation:

ASH

/aʃ/