Definition of artist in English:

artist

noun

  • 1A person who creates paintings or drawings as a profession or hobby.

    • ‘I come from a family of artists, and painting was always an obvious choice for me.’
    • ‘The 35 exhibits from as many artists range from oil paintings, photography and videos to mixed-media installations.’
    • ‘The first extensive exhibition in this country devoted to the paintings and drawings of the Renaissance artist will uncover his origins and trace the dramatic development of his style.’
    • ‘For the show, the artist has created a new sheet-rock structure based on the Golden Rectangle.’
    • ‘Hoptman is doubtless right that for many artists, drawing is no longer a secondary genre.’
    • ‘One bathroom featured a Thai Buddha while others were hung with paintings by artists such as Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo.’
    • ‘The artist Michelangelo Pistoletto created the furniture for the different areas of the building.’
    • ‘Just like any art, the ultimate value of the work depends on the artist who created it.’
    • ‘There he met all the other famous artists like Henri Matisse, Joan Miro and George Braques.’
    • ‘In a way, the question is: are we allowed as artists to create art out of suffering?’
    • ‘During the years at the Bauhaus the artist had his most productive and prolific time.’
    • ‘The staff at Rand Water will also contribute by working with a professional artist to create an artwork made up of chosen elements from the archives of Rand Water.’
    • ‘Signac believed that the artist's ability to create harmony was stronger in a peaceful setting.’
    • ‘In 1917 the French artist Marcel Duchamp created one of the most famous of Dadaist statements in New York.’
    • ‘Paintings also allow the artist to reconstruct the events in a way that the photograph cannot.’
    • ‘The artist's drawings and paintings will be featured between December 14 and January 18.’
    • ‘The irony of inviting an Aboriginal artist to create a work for a rifle range was not lost on Andrew.’
    • ‘Cubist painting gave to artists complete freedom to deal with reality in art in any way they chose.’
    • ‘Australian born artist, singer and animal lover Rolf Harris is a former resident of Sydenham.’
    • ‘Jeanette Jarville is a Richmond artist who began oil painting at the age of 11.’
    creator, originator, designer, producer, fine artist
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A person who practises or performs any of the creative arts, such as a sculptor, film-maker, actor, or dancer.
      • ‘Hollywood sees a moral dimension in protecting its property and the creative works of its artists, as well as a nobility in bringing entertainment to the masses.’
      • ‘Logan and Murray-Leslie hide in a back room surrounded by friends: fashion buyers, designers, film-makers, artists.’
      • ‘Some of Britain's finest artists will be performing in villages across the county as part of Rural Arts Wiltshire's spring season 2003.’
      • ‘I doubt I can actually retire either, but that's another question, one facing many artists and creative people, especially women.’
      • ‘The WSF was in some ways like a circus - a huge performing act with many artists, acrobats, entertainers.’
      • ‘Also, in an effort to promote khadi, models will display the garments while artists will perform traditional cultural programmes.’
      • ‘Other events on the day include performing artists, novelty races, face painting, workshops, market stalls and music.’
      • ‘Visual artists and filmmakers teamed up with dancers and musicians.’
      • ‘Creative artists, screenwriters and filmmakers will need time to figure it out too.’
      • ‘I believe our filmmakers, writers, poets, and visual and performing artists do us proud, alongside those of anywhere in the world.’
      • ‘Designing this seemingly simple piece of light sculpture required a creative team of artists, architects, and designers.’
      • ‘She will perform with other local artists at the launch.’
      • ‘Poets, musicians, dance troupes, artists and actors from various African and Caribbean nations will be on the ship.’
      • ‘Clowns relieve tension during performances by artists such as acrobats, flying trapezists and jugglers.’
      • ‘Company dancers, along with some guest artists perform 10 works, which they've created themselves.’
      • ‘There will also be face painters, clowns, artists, magicians and creatures of all shapes and sizes roving through the festival site.’
      • ‘Also, they all work in creative fields - artists, musicians, writers, architectural photographers, cartoonists.’
      • ‘Deep in the quiet art kingdom, visitors may be summoned by the loud sound of beating gongs and drums to an open-air stage, where local artists perform the drum dance.’
      • ‘Contemporary dance artists Forecast will be performing their new show Ready at Lancaster University's Nuffield Theatre on Tuesday.’
      • ‘He is one of the 150 artists performing worldwide for Cirque du Soleil.’
      entertainer, performer, trouper, showman
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 A person skilled at a particular task or occupation:
      ‘a surgeon who is an artist with the scalpel’
      • ‘Yes, his squad of highly skilled artists can weave beautiful patterns and cut a poor defence to ribbons, but we knew that anyway.’
      • ‘This was of course without the skilled crew of artists and technicians special effects departments deploy today.’
      • ‘Make-up artists and beauty consultants will be on hand throughout the day offering advise and tips on how to perfect your make-up and skincare regime.’
      • ‘We have two positions for artists skilled in modelling and texturing.’
      expert, master, maestro, past master, adept, virtuoso, genius, old hand, skilled person
      View synonyms
  • 2informal [with modifier] A person who habitually practises a specified reprehensible activity:

    ‘rip-off artists’
    • ‘I don't condone cheats and con artists who swindle innocent victims out of their hard-earned cash.’
    • ‘Some of history's greatest scams have been perpetrated by con artists masquerading as philanthropists.’
    • ‘Scam artists have become quite skilled at creating sophisticated offering statements, Crawford says.’
    • ‘There's no doubt about it, computer technology makes life easier for con artists and identity thieves.’
    • ‘In the United States, thousands of people are ripped off by con artists selling bogus investments.’
    • ‘The scheme, supported by the Evening Advertiser, was set up in Wroughton, a burglary hotspot, in August 2002 to combat the activities of con artists.’
    • ‘These are not a bunch of empty promises made by a seasoned con artist.’
    • ‘The ex-husband, on the other hand, is one of those cardboard cutout con artist crooks whose rather simple death is more decent than he deserves.’
    • ‘Mankind being what it is, murderers, robbers, thieves, thugs, and con artists will always exist.’
    • ‘The middle-aged con artist partners up with young two-bit purse snatcher Fiona, played by Liane Balaban.’
    • ‘Fraudsters and scam artists are cashing in on the generosity of the public according to Trading Standard officials.’
    • ‘When one is dealing with fraudsters and scam artists, there is almost no chance of ever getting the money back.’
    • ‘All too regularly we carry stories detailing how con artists and thieves swindled and stole from householders.’

Origin

Early 16th century (denoting a master of the liberal arts): from French artiste, from Italian artista, from arte art, from Latin ars, art-.

Pronunciation:

artist

/ˈɑːtɪst/