Definition of art union in English:

art union

noun

  • 1Australian NZ A large-scale lottery organized to raise funds for a charity or public cause, originally with a work of art as the prize.

    ‘the party's executive president has defended the decision to run an art union’
    • ‘Tthe money was raised through art unions, charity lunches and memorabilia auctions.’
    • ‘He rejected claims the art union fundraiser was improper.’
    • ‘The wraps were taken off art unions and other kinds of raffles, and NSW even legalised poker machines.’
    • ‘They hope to raise $500,000 though their own registered Art Union lottery, with a BMW as first prize.’
    • ‘Responsibilities included the collection, handling and sorting of cash, and cheques (including lottery, art union proceeds etc).’
    • ‘The art union movement enjoyed great initial success, but it collapsed when local courts stopped the lotteries.’
    • ‘A new exhibition at the Art Gallery of Ballarat will explore the mysterious past of art union lotteries.’
    • ‘The Lotteries and Art Union Regulation 2007 states that the portion of a cash prize over $2000 must be issued with a "crossed cheque" or by electronic transfer into a nominated bank account.’
  • 2historical A group established for the purpose of promoting art by purchasing the works of artists and distributing them among members, usually by lottery.

    ‘his work was acquired by art unions in Glasgow and Edinburgh’
    • ‘He chaired the select committees on art unions and on legal education.’
    • ‘Many of his large plates appeared in the 1840s and were published for the art unions.’
    • ‘Private galleries and art unions stayed active in the 1950s but were gradually closed.’
    • ‘Modesty Unveiled was refused for the 1846 Art Union competition as too sensual.’
    • ‘His proximity to all forms of art led him to becoming an Academician of the Russian Academy of Arts and the head of the art union "Mir Iskusstva".’
    • ‘In the 1840s, artists and metropolitan businessmen joined together to form art-buying clubs known as art unions.’
    • ‘Reproductions were now copiously available in books or accessible through one of the 'art unions' that promoted the sale of artistic prints.’
    • ‘Run by businessmen, the art unions raised money by selling memberships to genteel art lovers around the nation, used these funds to purchase art from participating artists, and exhibited their purchases in tastefully appointed urban galleries.’
    • ‘This saw the birth of the first art unions in the 19th century.’
    • ‘Local artists were encouraged by the American Art Union, founded in 1839 to buy paintings for distribution by lottery.’