Definition of arrow of time (or time's arrow) in English:

arrow of time (or time's arrow)

phrase

  • The direction of travel from past to future in time considered as a physical dimension.

    • ‘So in the physics department we have classes on the arrow of time, quantum mechanics for everyone.’
    • ‘After all, to play most sports, even at the level of the village green or recreational field, is to be reminded ceaselessly of time's arrow: of the ruthless, inexorable, uni-directionality of our lives.’
    • ‘Follow the giant arrow of time from the origin of the universe, through the creation of stars, planets, human life, modern culture and beyond into the future.’
    • ‘The circles of periodicity are really spirals, stretched out along the arrow of time that flies only in one direction, and sooner or later brings down every creature.’
    • ‘Some recent changes have been of the kind that make you wish time's arrow could be less relentless.’
    • ‘The recognition of these patterns of eclipses in the archives then would have allowed them to reverse the arrow of time, and project the cycles into the future.’
    • ‘There was a conference on Wheeler Feynman electrodynamics and the arrow of time, in 1963.’
    • ‘The idea that time's arrow is unidirectional is really an observation.’
    • ‘In the late twentieth century, an arrow of time may have been discovered at the subatomic level.’
    • ‘I learned something about the psychological arrow of time from David Albert.’
    • ‘There are at least two other branches of physical theory in which raise the question of the arrow of time, as it is sometimes called.’
    • ‘In other words, in the microworld, there is no intrinsic arrow of time, distinguishing the future from the past.’
    • ‘If the thermodynamic arrow of time [for periods much shorter than Poincare's recurrence time] is to be explained by entropy increase, as Boltzmann hoped, then we want to know why entropy was so low in the past.’
    • ‘In whichever direction a writer shoots time's arrow, though, the bowstring is human nature, a relative constant.’
    • ‘In physics, a question which often bothers theoreticians is the origin of an arrow of time.’
    • ‘I'm still at NYU, giving a seminar this afternoon on inflation and the arrow of time.’
    • ‘It's not a method of somehow reversing the arrow of time.’