Definition of argumentation in English:

argumentation

noun

mass noun
  • The action or process of reasoning systematically in support of an idea, action, or theory.

    ‘lines of argumentation used to support his thesis’
    • ‘It is instructive to follow the Post's line of argumentation.’
    • ‘This line of argumentation raises one rather obvious question.’
    • ‘This seems to be a very strange line of argumentation.’
    • ‘US teachers also indicated the importance of using examples, details, and logical argumentation.’
    • ‘What then do we make of his contradictory argumentation that we should maintain a large money stock even though we are unable to do so?’
    • ‘As noted, contemporary textbooks tended to discuss argumentation in terms of logic.’
    • ‘This line of argumentation was accepted by the health authorities.’
    • ‘Effective in their appeal to the general reader, they are less convincing at the level of specialist argumentation.’
    • ‘This brings one to the fundamental flaw in your line of argumentation.’
    • ‘An instant of honesty and compassion is more important than an hour of logical argumentation and the facts.’
    • ‘This line of argumentation is currently being hotly debated in legal circles.’
    • ‘Tourgee's line of argumentation in Plessy, its view of the role of the justice system, is complex and bears further analysis.’
    • ‘This is a passionate essay, but one that tends to substitute assertion for argumentation and engagement.’
    • ‘Music is about emotional expression, not logical argumentation.’
    • ‘Being an aesthete with high standards of evidence and argumentation, these intrusions chap him.’
    • ‘Far more interesting, though, is the quality of argumentation offered in support of Derrida's importance.’
    • ‘Jenkins's argumentation does not just rest on abstract theory.’
    • ‘Is The New Rhetoric about the arguments people make, or about the process of argumentation?’
    • ‘He listened patiently to others, never interrupting them, and then won them over to his way of thinking by logical argumentation.’
    • ‘The bottom line in such argumentation was reminiscent of the objective of all despotic regimes to genuine political participation.’
    reasoning, line of reasoning, logic, case
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: via Old French from Latin argumentatio(n-), from argumentat- ‘conducted as an argument’, from argumentari.

Pronunciation

argumentation

/ˌɑːɡjʊmɛnˈteɪʃ(ə)n/