Definition of appointment in English:

appointment

noun

  • 1An arrangement to meet someone at a particular time and place.

    ‘she made an appointment with my receptionist’
    • ‘Students who made an appointment are asked to go back and do so again.’
    • ‘I have made an appointment with the director at the mental health trust to talk through what she is looking for and see how it could fit with my career plans.’
    • ‘Parents may feel free to contact Mary at the school and arrange for an appointment to meet her.’
    • ‘A friend of mine works in a hairdressers down the road so I made an appointment and off we went.’
    • ‘We made an appointment for 2 weeks after that phone call to sit down and get things started.’
    • ‘Many patients also wish to use email to book or cancel appointments, arrange non-urgent consultations, and request repeat prescriptions.’
    • ‘The Doctor ordered an ultrasound immediately and made an appointment to see Andy on that Saturday morning.’
    • ‘The doctor referred us to the clinic and we made an appointment for the two day counselling session that was required first.’
    • ‘I have been told they should have made an appointment before visiting and I am not obliged to tell them anything.’
    • ‘We wait for someone who has made an appointment, and not kept it, or made contact.’
    • ‘In the end, my sister-in-law made an appointment for him, and told him to stop being so pathetic.’
    • ‘He made an appointment for us to return to the hospital the next day to see the specialist who was treating my wife's cancer.’
    • ‘The therapist then assigned homework and made an appointment for the next session.’
    • ‘We were building a house in Isleworth, and I had made an appointment to meet a friend of ours on the site.’
    • ‘I phoned up my local private hospital, and made an appointment for the following Thursday!’
    • ‘She made an appointment to see her GP the next day, taking along a list of matching symptoms.’
    • ‘A person ought to be capable of functioning well in everyday activities such as socialising, meeting appointments and keeping financial commitments.’
    • ‘We felt she was a genuine caller and an officer made an appointment to meet her; the lady did not turn up.’
    • ‘She has got me to go to hospital appointments by arranging dates, transport and so on.’
    • ‘They hadn't made an appointment and nobody at the schools knew who they were.’
    meeting, engagement, interview, arrangement, consultation, session
    View synonyms
  • 2An act of assigning a job or position to someone.

    ‘his appointment as President’
    • ‘He dedicates one chapter to describing the leader's grandsons' appointments to key positions in the government.’
    • ‘Moreover, when his appointments to the key positions of Secretary of State, National Security Adviser and Defence Secretary are examined, a clearer picture emerges.’
    • ‘This was his first visit to Bulgaria after his recent appointment to the position.’
    • ‘The statement said that the sudden appointments of new people to key diplomatic positions abroad was a cause of concern, as it could result in politicization of the diplomatic services.’
    • ‘They could make appointments to local positions of influence, they could often grant titles and confer privileges, which would raise the local status of a corporation or individual.’
    • ‘But principals are concerned at delays in a review of the staffing system proposed last year, as they want to know their allocations in time to make appointments for September.’
    • ‘Only one in four faculty appointments was to a full-time, tenure-track position.’
    • ‘He asked for a Sense of Council regarding her appointment to this position, and it was positive.’
    • ‘Her appointment, beginning on Monday, is the second key post to be given to a woman at North Yorkshire Police in recent weeks.’
    • ‘In his era, appointments to university positions in Britain were heavily influenced by religious considerations.’
    • ‘The appointment of a trustee transforms the position of the investor.’
    • ‘This is about the appointment of a second chief executive to a Taranaki public health bureaucracy.’
    • ‘The intervening three years have failed to bring a second appointment.’
    • ‘And he then made a series of more or less statesmanlike appointments to senior positions.’
    • ‘There are certain positions that I have the right to make appointments to for which there is no need to consult the warring parties.’
    • ‘Recent appointments also are putting more dealer-friendly faces in key positions’
    • ‘This practice is particularly important in appointments for public positions.’
    • ‘Alexander is currently posted in Moscow, his second appointment to Russia.’
    • ‘Accordingly the purchaser would be warned to insist on the appointment of a second trustee for his own protection.’
    • ‘Pat asked who was in a position to assess a referee from another county before his appointment.’
    nomination, naming, designation, designating, installation, commissioning, engagement, adoption, co-option
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 A job or position.
      ‘she took up an appointment as head of communications’
      • ‘One-year appointments no longer count as adjunct positions.’
      • ‘Many institutions have converted full-time appointments to positions held by part-time faculty or graduate assistants.’
      • ‘As pressure for success has grown, match-fixing teams have transformed the lowly position of referee into one of the most lucrative appointments in Chinese sport.’
      • ‘Two positions are PhD-RD positions with cross appointments with the University of Toronto.’
      • ‘Several of the Army's senior commanders are also taking up new appointments, as some members are promoted to new positions and others retire to civilian life.’
      • ‘Initially, Tony sees the job as a temporary appointment, just to help him earn enough money to get a flight back to England.’
      • ‘Seven of the nine justices received their appointments from Republican presidents.’
      • ‘He invited Aaron into the departmental discussion about how it would handle the new appointments, who might apply, and what the position might look like.’
      • ‘He was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 1927, and held many offices and appointments in professional and academic bodies.’
      • ‘These figures should be considered an approximate first draft, in part because some professors have cross-departmental appointments.’
      • ‘Clubs in our league will all have to have a Child Welfare Officer and so far I have received details of such appointments from 20 of our clubs.’
      • ‘The town crier for Dalton-in-Furness does the job so well that he has landed himself a second appointment.’
      • ‘All the existing secretarial positions in the company are part-time appointments.’
      • ‘The appointments will be allocated to the better performing panel umpires.’
      • ‘And of course, there's the exhaustion of fighting for benefits and appointments.’
      • ‘But it can be more complex than that, for example involving a series of fixed-term appointments with both employed and self-employed opportunities mixed in.’
      • ‘In 1850, he returned to Ireland to take up an appointment as Archbishop of Armagh.’
      • ‘Federal judges have extremely secure positions, founded on the Constitution's provision for lifetime appointments.’
      • ‘And then I thought of that notion when it came to jobs, professorships, corporate board appointments.’
      • ‘Worse, the poshest individual regiments effectively reserve public appointments, in the form of commissions, for friends of the old school tie.’
      job, post, position, situation, employment, engagement, place, office, station
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2 A person appointed to a job or position.
      ‘government ministers and other political appointments are frequently replaced’
      • ‘Thereafter there will be debate about the new appointments among the cabinet and provincial premiers.’
      • ‘The news comes in the wake of a national survey that found that one in five new secondary school appointments are rated as unsatisfactory by headteachers.’
      • ‘Published papers are also distributed to selected appointments, so your work has a good chance of reaching the right eyes.’
      • ‘The first is that the people who spark objections are second-tier appointments.’
      • ‘Section 91, which allows for a maximum of two appointments from outside the National Assembly, is limited to Cabinet ministers.’
      • ‘The vast majority of the advisers are not civil servants, but political appointments hand-picked by ministers.’
  • 3appointmentsFurniture or fittings.

    ‘the room was spartan in its appointments’
    • ‘The rooms are gracious, large, airy and furnished with elegant appointments.’
    • ‘Its rooms are tastefully and luxuriously furnished, with appointments not normally available at these prices.’
    • ‘In a country where career politicians usually fill Cabinet posts, his anti-establishment appointments caused a stir.’
    • ‘Each suite is authentically furnished with appointments directed to personal comfort.’
    • ‘While he is recognized for these fanciful appointments, he did more than build furniture.’
    • ‘The decor is unmistakably high class with the fixtures, fittings and appointments setting a relaxed yet cultured atmosphere.’
    • ‘In her update of Olympia, entitled Tribeca, an older, clothed woman and a naked young man of Asian descent sit in a loft space furnished with modern appointments.’
    • ‘The sculpture depicts a throne chair flanked by an altar table, pulpit, offertory tables - in other words, by church appointments.’
    • ‘The table appointments are also of very high quality, with the black and silver chopsticks being exceptional.’
    • ‘Repeat variations of the color in fixtures or other appointments for a cohesive look.’
    furnishings, furniture, units, fixtures, fitments, equipment, appointments, accoutrements, appurtenances
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • by appointment

    • Having previously made an arrangement to do something.

      ‘visits are by appointment only’
      • ‘He may only travel to his solicitor's office in central London by appointment and carrying a letter proving such an arrangement had been made.’
      • ‘Instinct makes sure I see them only in the room in my chosen working hours, from late morning or their lunchtime to early or mid-evening, and only by appointment.’
      • ‘This exhibition can be viewed by special arrangement with the organizers and by appointment only.’
      • ‘Tours outside these hours can also be arranged by appointment.’
      • ‘Additional visits can be arranged by appointment and they also cater for birthday and school parties.’
      • ‘Make sure to call ahead as visits are by appointment only.’
      • ‘Clients can be seen by appointment outside of opening hours’
      • ‘I would have much preferred to see the place by appointment, even if 20 other people did the same.’
      • ‘Inspections can be arranged by appointment with the auctioneer.’
      • ‘Salesmen will still be able to visit private houses, but only by appointment.’
  • by appointment to the Queen

    • (in the UK) used by manufacturers to indicate that their products are sold to the queen and are therefore of guaranteed quality.

      • ‘The bathroom is beige and brown marble, with yellow apricot and almond toiletries, toilet soap makers by appointment to the Queen, the Queen Mother and the Prince of Wales.’
      • ‘Her jewellery is by appointment to the Queen and Crown Princess and our own royal family.’
      • ‘Moreover, having been in business since 1707, it provides items by appointment to the Queen and Prince of Wales.’
      • ‘Mongeham Post Office, on the way to Deal, sells all you may require including the local Ice cream by appointment to the Queen Mother.’
      • ‘It is by appointment to the Queen and does a huge mail-order range, from calves' liver to French Loue chicken.’
      • ‘And, after you’ve spent hours shopping, what better way to end the day than with a glass of champagne, by appointment to the queen, of course.’
      • ‘Crocks of blue-veined Stilton cheese from the interior dairy areas were stamped that they were by appointment to the Queen herself.’
      • ‘There is a sweater shop just up the road (by appointment to the Queen).’
      • ‘My father was Australia's senior master sail-maker, by appointment to the Queen.’
      • ‘The village has a church surrounded by a green, flower beds and trees, and shops which proudly display above their doors painted Royal Arms saying 'by appointment' to the Queen or Prince Charles, whose Highland summer retreat, Balmoral, is a few miles upstream.’
  • power of appointment

    • 1Power to select the holder of a particular job or position.

      • ‘The new motion said that power of appointment should lie with the Scottish parliament.’
      • ‘A first, critical, step in giving them strength and restoring the role of Parliament is removing the power of appointment from the whips and handing it over to MPs themselves.’
      • ‘In the paragraph that this passage appears in, he is arguing against the notion that the President should have the sole power of appointment without the consent of the Senate.’
      • ‘Now he is trying to use the courts to legislate a mandate the voters never gave him by abusing the power of appointment and ignoring the Constitution's ‘advise and consent’ clause.’
      • ‘The power of appointment can also be used, as it was by one President, to impose policies on a bureaucracy that might be unsympathetic to them.’
      • ‘It would then be very clear that there is no power of replacement invested in the chairperson but simply that the chairperson has a power of appointment, which is what I believe the provision was intended to do.’
      • ‘It is true that deans and professors are mentioned as the first objects of the power of appointment conferred by that section; but we attach no importance to that circumstance.’
      • ‘There is a balancing of local and national interests that must be served here, and the very least we might expect is for the Minister to give some power of appointment of at least a minority of the positions to local government in the region.’
      • ‘The power of appointment and dismissal stands entirely independently of the conditions of employment which are comprised in the contract.’
      • ‘The President has the power of appointment under the Constitution, and the President has reached his position of power through a democratic process that today very much includes debate about the direction the Supreme Court should take.’
    • 2Law
      Power to decide the disposal of property, in exercise of a right conferred by the owner.

      • ‘In the disposal of the property for the benefit of each child the respondent wife has been given a voice both as trustee and under a power of appointment, even though it is the husband who provides all the money…’
      • ‘A general power of appointment permits the trustees to appoint in favour of anyone they choose (including the settlor).’
      • ‘There was an ‘exercise of a power of appointment under a settlement’ and they did two things: one, they gave some assets to a person absolutely and there was no issue that that created a capital gains tax problem.’
      power of appointment, right of appointment, favouritism, nepotism, partisanship, partiality, preferential treatment
      View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from Old French apointement, from apointer (see appoint).

Pronunciation

appointment

/əˈpɔɪntm(ə)nt/