Definition of apart in English:

apart

adverb

  • 1(of two or more people or things) separated by a specified distance in time or space.

    ‘two stone gateposts some thirty feet apart’
    ‘studies from as far apart as America and Iceland’
    figurative ‘the two sides remained far apart on the issue of cruise missiles’
    • ‘Lie on your back, legs straight, and extend your arms overhead, stretching your hands and feet as far apart as possible.’
    • ‘The hardwoods are spaced eight feet apart in rows ten feet wide, a spacing that accommodates 540 trees per acre.’
    • ‘She stayed in one place, her feet about as far apart as her shoulders, and really only her legs moved.’
    • ‘You simply use a split stance - your feet spaced about hip-width apart, one foot forward, the other behind you.’
    • ‘The outcroppings were spaced eight feet apart and at seemingly random intervals fire was being shot upward from the floor.’
    • ‘The lights were spaced three feet apart, just enough to cast an eerie glow over the stairs.’
    • ‘The marchers were held back by police men and women spaced about three feet apart.’
    • ‘Two fences (one high and one moderately high) spaced about three feet apart are recommended.’
    • ‘The passing of our friend Schwartz is being noted in venues as far apart as The Independent and The Cleveland Plain Dealer.’
    • ‘The doors were spaced about five feet apart, but again, I didn't note that it was significant.’
    • ‘When backing up, he keeps his feet spaced apart and his head up - something young linemen often forget to do.’
    • ‘His strong posture with his feet spaced a little apart made him appear really large.’
    • ‘With the end of the consultation period today, the two sides remain as far apart as ever.’
    • ‘Three wooden fence posts marked the end of the property, spaced roughly ten feet apart, and ending up at the neighbors chain link.’
    • ‘With your feet spaced shoulder-width apart, raise the bar off the rack.’
    • ‘The cattle grates were made from rebar spaced about a foot apart and about ten feet wide.’
    • ‘Plant seeds at least 12 inches apart in rows spaced 3 feet apart.’
    • ‘I added rolled-rim terra-cotta pots on this edge, spaced 10 feet apart.’
    • ‘The cast-in-place piers are graceful, slender, and elegant with curving surfaces, spaced 142 feet apart.’
    • ‘The exterior of the towers was made of 12-inch steel columns spaced four feet apart.’
    away from each other, distant from each other
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    1. 1.1No longer living together or close emotionally.
      ‘alcoholism had driven us apart’
      • ‘Many spouses live apart for considerable periods of time; often the economic situation is so desperate that they have to look for means of subsistence on their own.’
      • ‘The Germans found, however, that living apart slows the decline in female libido, confirming the maxim ‘absence makes the heart grow fonder’.’
      • ‘People are brought together, not pushed apart.’
      • ‘The survey confirmed that couples preferred to be poorer and happy apart than together, comfortably off and miserable.’
      • ‘Groups such as Family Mediation Scotland are attempting to help families stay together, but apart.’
      • ‘Asking for things you know your partner won't want to do is likely to make you feel further apart, not closer together.’
      • ‘I think the only way we will survive is if we live apart, the main reason is because he is constantly blaming the fact that I am a model, for the problems I am having.’
      • ‘More than that, theirs is a great love story, an exquisitely painful romance of two self-proclaimed soulmates who can't live together yet can't live apart.’
      • ‘He likens it to a marriage, spiked with petulant tiffs, where affection has cooled into mutual respect and where the partners are increasingly living apart together.’
      • ‘This foursome is public property: a rock group who have just got back together after 23 years apart.’
      • ‘‘Me and my girlfriend, Julie, live closer when we live apart,’ he explains.’
      • ‘In the past three years her symptoms have become so aggravated that they are living apart while they consider how best to handle the monthly eruptions.’
      • ‘Yet he and his wife Sarah have spent most of their life together apart, her in Cheshire and him in West London, and have considered separating in the past.’
      • ‘Intimacy then becomes cold and degrading, leading the couple farther apart, not closer together.’
      • ‘Their lives having moved so far apart and yet so close together.’
      • ‘They graduate together, drift apart at University and begin to face the terrors of being a twentysomething at the same time.’
      • ‘Lately the two have spent more time apart than Paige considers healthy.’
      • ‘Drawn together but also driven apart by their strong personalities, each has worked on solo projects or in different line-ups over the years.’
      • ‘This is where a man and woman consider themselves a couple, but live apart.’
      • ‘I also feel for me and my fiance who will be apart for some considerable time whilst we plough through this stuff.’
  • 2To or on one side; at a distance from the main body.

    ‘Isabel stepped away from Joanna and stood apart’
    • ‘I'm still wondering about the man in the plumed turban standing apart and detached watching sailors and vendors at work.’
    • ‘A cynic would say that this writer who claimed to stand alone and apart was actually quite prepared to lose himself in the herd.’
    • ‘He has also been setting apart a considerable amount of time for social activities.’
    • ‘The question that can be asked is: can a certain percentage of replenishable groundwater be considered to be set apart for agriculture?’
    • ‘What stands Mew apart from most of these bands is the style in which they were recorded.’
    • ‘It is this new sense of collaboration that sets this year's Art Fair apart from previous years.’
    • ‘A side-yard garden is a world unto itself, so consider ways of setting it apart.’
    • ‘This element of the film works beautifully, and sets it apart from everything else of its type.’
    • ‘But on top of this he must cope with a major problem that has set him apart from his friends since he was six.’
    • ‘It was her husband who noticed the man standing apart from the little group of mourners, and went over.’
    to one side, aside, to the side
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    1. 2.1Used after a noun to indicate that someone or something has qualities which mark them out from other people or things.
      ‘wrestlers were a breed apart’
      • ‘But what really sets the 80s apart was the quality of teen flicks.’
      • ‘It's said one quality that sets Rove apart is his ability to see the whole playing field in politics.’
      • ‘Generally speaking, this was the only time the brethren met, for what most marked the Carthusians apart was that they lived not communally but in isolation, each in his own cell.’
      • ‘She remarked that one of the things that sets Tullow Show apart was the quality of the trade stands it attracts.’
      • ‘‘What sets us apart is the quality of our collection,’ says Rochelle Keene, chief curator of the gallery.’
      • ‘What marks this transaction apart is that here we are dealing with 100 per cent ownership.’
      • ‘What sets Film and Feelings apart is the special quality of its responsiveness.’
      • ‘Without question these women constitute a breed apart.’
      • ‘Setting the outlaw apart and marking him as truly heroic, oral traditions in particular ascribe his continued success to supernatural protection.’
      • ‘It is only their subject matter that is different and marks them apart.’
      • ‘I was not exactly a Casanova but I did enough to keep my engine ticking over and none of the girls I had known could match up to Sarah - she had a special quality that set her apart.’
      • ‘However much fans call referees' eyesight into question, the men in black won't waver because, according to new research, referees are simply a breed apart.’
      • ‘Portlanders, you understand, are a breed apart.’
      • ‘One of the qualities that sets him apart is that he probably believes he's the best player on the floor.’
      • ‘Regular callers to these programmes are a breed apart.’
      • ‘What really sets them apart is the quality of the participants and the detail and interest of the material.’
      • ‘Many of us also have other features that mark us apart.’
      • ‘But the mosaic which marks the villa apart is located between the baths and the patio.’
      • ‘In an act of defiance he cut of his Coleta (Pigtail worn by bullfighters) that marked them apart.’
      • ‘He shot four superb points but it was his overall winning, carrying of and running off the ball and passing that marked him apart.’
    2. 2.2Used to indicate that one is dismissing something from consideration or moving from one tone or topic to another.
      ‘Alaska apart, much of America's energy business concentrates on producing gas’
      ‘joking apart, they do a really remarkable job’
      • ‘Okay okay, jokes apart, this is one movie I am really looking forward to.’
      • ‘Considerations of the kinetic theory apart, Perrin was able to establish that the density of Brownian particles obeys the gas laws.’
      • ‘Translation skills apart, what qualities do you need to be an effective sign-singer?’
      • ‘With a wife and two grown up daughters who must be concerned at the level of vitriol thrown at their breadwinner, has he ever considered packing it all in, his lucrative renumeration apart?’
      • ‘Their qualifications, ideals and fresh appeal apart, the new breed has been working hard to succeed.’
      • ‘The quality of the competition apart, what let things down was the abysmal and partisan television coverage.’
      • ‘It's also a remarkably sexy record, considering that - pin-up singer apart - the band still look like brickies.’
      • ‘Bonetti's dismissal and Artero's outstanding strike effort apart, the second period was almost subdued compared to the first 45 minutes.’
      • ‘Financial considerations apart, was he worth all that palaver?’
      • ‘Jokes apart, Bollywood is also the single largest showcase of ethnic art and culture.’
      • ‘But jokes apart I have been wanting to do something beyond photography.’
      • ‘Though joking apart and with an eye on why we admire the Austin Ambassador so damn much, that crude range of engines were all service friendly and able to hit a hundred thousand miles with the right amount of care.’
      • ‘Robertstown for their part will be disappointed by a performance in which centre-back Mark Kelly apart they had few stars.’
      • ‘Jokes apart, the success of this story depends on all of you.’
      • ‘Jokes apart, she's also been a convincing character actress.’
      • ‘Leadership qualities apart, it is his positive view of the life which has helped him maintain his cool all along and this seems to be keeping him hale and hearty.’
      • ‘All jokes apart, this is not is not meant to disrespect them in any which way.’
      • ‘Jokes apart, I think many need to have a clear understanding of the demographics of the Muslim world.’
      • ‘Human invasion apart, the quality of this reserve has deteriorated over the years.’
  • 3So as to be shattered; into pieces.

    ‘he leapt out of the car just before it was blown apart’
    • ‘It is pale yellow, and arrives molded in hard cakes that slice apart into gelatinous pieces.’
    • ‘I saw bits and pieces of it breaking apart and falling faster.’
    • ‘Amy sighed and broke apart the pieces, handing them out.’
    • ‘And then you start tearing it apart in bits and pieces and start writing notes to yourself, remember in scene so and so you're going to do so and so, so set it up now.’
    • ‘It was a four-inch bullet that entered her body and broke apart.’
    • ‘I was going to take her words apart piece by piece.’
    • ‘As soon as he walks away, an explosion blasts the elevator doors apart.’
    • ‘And in innumerable other minutes of the 90, they were carved apart by a Kilmarnock team who spurned so many opportunities it was barely credible.’
    • ‘Pieces are quickly torn apart in search of the coin which brings good luck for the rest of the year’
    • ‘It was a 3-inch-long tube about the size of a lipstick, which came apart in two pieces.’
    • ‘Desperate to avoid forking out thousands, Chris planned to take the plane apart and transport the pieces in 12 lorries to Tameside.’
    • ‘In the workshop a damaged chest by Hericourt, from 1780, with its warped veneer has been taken apart piece by piece and completely reconstructed.’
    • ‘She'd learned that lesson a long time ago, even though it had involved taking apart pieces of the ship and ruining them beyond repair.’
    • ‘The blast, which occurred at around 11.40 am, ripped apart piece of the pavement, throwing concrete and other debris on the roadway.’
    • ‘The best way to apply multiple colors is to take the piece apart.’
    • ‘Furniture had been torn apart, and shattered glass covered the floor.’
    • ‘However, chromosome pairs would sometimes break apart and exchange pieces - a process known as crossing over.’
    • ‘So it's a good thing the meteor blew apart into small pieces in the upper atmosphere, rather than just above the ground.’
    • ‘This will be done by taking the tower apart piece by piece and removing the rubble in secure containers.’
    • ‘In addition, I'd hear noises resembling someone tugging/prying apart pieces of wood.’
    to pieces, to bits, in pieces
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Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French, from Latin a parte at the side.

Pronunciation:

apart

/əˈpɑːt/