Definition of antipathy in English:

antipathy

noun

  • [mass noun] A deep-seated feeling of aversion.

    ‘his fundamental antipathy to capitalism’
    • ‘The Premiership clubs have never disguised their antipathy to the principle of one up, one down.’
    • ‘Whatever the accuracy of those perceptions, the mutual antipathy is unspoken, but pervasive.’
    • ‘Still, there is plenty of blame on both sides of the Atlantic for this display of mutual antipathy.’
    • ‘This should go down in the annals of history, as I've never enjoyed doing a job before, managing at best antipathy.’
    • ‘In my view, his condition will persist while he remains in conflict with the Force as his antipathy is now so deep-seated and consuming.’
    • ‘Despite her antipathy towards MacKenzie, she may well have picked up pointers from him about how to manage journalists.’
    • ‘Might it not, however, be more accurate to call it antipathy?’
    • ‘As is customary, much was made of the mutual antipathy between the two fighters in the run-up to the contest.’
    • ‘And the level of antipathy towards the president's visit shocked some.’
    • ‘Despite my antipathy to regular cleaning, I love intensive organizing and cleaning sessions.’
    • ‘So Davis will begin his second term under clouds of apathy, if not antipathy.’
    • ‘This affects my entire perception of the city, filling me with disquiet, antipathy and even a certain revulsion.’
    • ‘Webber got pregnant, although by the time the baby was born her antipathy towards him was so great she refused to put his name on the birth certificate.’
    • ‘That is not to say he has any antipathy towards Coulthard.’
    • ‘This was unusual, given conventional medicine's antipathy towards anything considered wacky or unprovable.’
    • ‘The wee Glasgow derby may lack the sectarian undertones of the big one, but it lacks none of the mutual antipathy.’
    • ‘The only person I know who could afford to live in Japan for a stint returned home with an acute allergy and antipathy to fish.’
    • ‘Mr Fowler's antipathy can be traced to his father, who fought in the First World War and was less than impressed by the French war leaders.’
    • ‘This antipathy towards fiction is a little difficult to understand.’
    • ‘There were many strands of antipathy in his life, among which a dislike for children seems to have been a constant.’
    hostility, antagonism, animosity, aversion, animus, opposition, enmity, dislike, distaste, ill will, ill feeling, hatred, hate, abhorrence, loathing, repugnance, odium
    grudge
    allergy
    disrelish
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 16th century (in the sense ‘opposition of feeling, nature, or disposition’): from French antipathie, or via Latin from Greek antipatheia, from antipathēs opposed in feeling, from anti against + pathos feeling.

Pronunciation:

antipathy

/anˈtɪpəθi/