Definition of anti-British in English:

anti-British

adjective

  • Hostile to the interests of Britain or the United Kingdom.

    • ‘Certainly, the angry President is stepping up his anti-British rhetoric.’
    • ‘Neither had been naturalised, and during the war they were decidedly anti-British.’
    • ‘The editorial sought to quell anti-British feelings prompted by disparaging remarks about the US made by the British prime minister.’
    • ‘I never heard him utter a word that was anti-British or anti-American.’
    • ‘The press showing silly idiots waving anti British banners around haven't helped the situation.’
    • ‘At the age of fifteen, he took part in anti-British demonstrations.’
    • ‘The "comment" consists of a further selection of anti-British insults.’
    • ‘The "Suez crisis" provoked a wave of anti-British agitation throughout the region.’
    • ‘The anti-British frame of mind was in full swing on the eve of the upcoming election.’
    • ‘Being passionate about Scotland doesn't make you anti-British.’
    • ‘Schools have been accused of being "anti-British" by asking pupils to take the side of the Spanish in lessons about the Armada.’
    • ‘London would never lend the money for an anti-British scheme.’
    • ‘This lady is not malicious, anti-British, or unkind.’
    • ‘There is no patriotic British republican tradition - what republicanism exists is, often explicitly, anti-British.’
    • ‘The war was certainly marked by gory events of anti-British violence.’
    • ‘These leaders showed little enthusiasm for the anti-British struggle.’
    • ‘Up until 1940, Franklin Roosevelt was perhaps the most persistently anti-British president in American history.’
    • ‘There is some irony in a song that is, essentially, anti-British topping a BBC poll.’
    • ‘British troops were withdrawn to the Suez Canal area in 1947, but nationalist, anti-British feelings continued to grow after the war.’
    • ‘By 1916 he was a leader in the group and was the last commander to surrender in the anti-British Easter Uprising.’