Definition of annul in English:

annul

verb

[with object]
  • 1Declare invalid (an official agreement, decision, or result)

    ‘the elections were annulled by the general amid renewed protests’
    • ‘Noriega annulled the election result and eventually the US sent in 24,000 troops to arrest him in 1989.’
    • ‘The Council of Guardians, an institution that stands above parliament, has annulled the election results of 12 constituencies so far.’
    • ‘Conflicts continue between the opposing camps following the decision by the Ukraine Supreme Court to annul the disputed result of the presidential election of November 21 and order a revote on December 26.’
    • ‘As soon as it was over the purged Councils annulled the results of the spring elections in 49 departments, leaving 177 vacant seats.’
    • ‘The Islamist party, the FIS, was winning what no one doubted was a free election when the military stepped in and annulled the results of the election.’
    • ‘He said the Haryana Government would not appeal against the Punjab decision to annul water agreements since Haryana's case had already been decided in its favour by the Supreme Court.’
    • ‘The Qualifications and Curriculum Authority has annulled the results of children at Grove Street Primary School in Barnsley.’
    • ‘The government says the Supreme Court's decision to annul election results in nine provinces proves that Cameroon is indeed a democracy.’
    • ‘Under the country's constitution, there is provision for parliament to declare a state of emergency and annul the results.’
    • ‘Local courts annulled the results of three municipal elections in Gaza, which Hamas claimed it had won.’
    • ‘Early this year, the House annulled the government's decision to raise the telephone rates by up to 35 percent, citing the government's failure to meet its promise of establishing the agency prior to the hike.’
    • ‘The November election results were annulled by the Supreme Court amid evidence of massive vote fraud, and Yushchenko won the Dec. 26 rerun.’
    • ‘A strong and dogged pursuance of the case and passage of the Punjab Termination Act, 2004 annulling all previous agreements on river water sharing since 1981 earned him great appreciation of the people of Punjab.’
    • ‘On 13 April 1997, Mali held a first round of legislative elections, but the results were annulled by the Constitutional Court.’
    • ‘The council can annul the results if the public finds fault in the election process or with the winners’ past performance.’
    • ‘Let us hope the Minister of Health, who is leading the fight against HIV-AIDS in our country, will heed our calls and annul the decision of abolishing the AIDS disability grant in full.’
    • ‘Independent monitors have asked the election commission to annul the results in districts where armed gangs shot at voters, snatched and burned ballots, and blocked access to the polls with vehicles and felled trees.’
    • ‘A losing presidential candidate in Ukraine is warning the country could descend into civil war if the results are not annulled.’
    • ‘In Kandy, in the central hills area, the election commissioner annulled the results from 23 polling centres on the basis of reports of ballot box stuffing and the use of violence to influence voting.’
    • ‘Delaying the reform until after the presidential elections in fact means annulling the results of local elections.’
    declare invalid, declare null and void, nullify, invalidate, void
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Declare (a marriage) to have had no legal existence.
      ‘her first marriage was finally annulled by His Holiness’
      • ‘A man surnamed Jia recently asked a local court to annul his marriage since his wife is his cousin.’
      • ‘He married his first wife Angie in 1978 and the marriage was annulled in 1984, three years after the birth of their son, Callum.’
      • ‘The Nebraska Legislature was asked to pass a law to annul marriages of all couples who do not, within three years after the wedding, have at least one child by Democrat representative Robert Hines, who is a bachelor.’
      • ‘Rawls is reportedly in the process of trying to annul his two-year marriage to protect his assets.’
      • ‘Later that year his first marriage was annulled and he married Isabella of Angoulême.’
      • ‘She was married when very young to Don Gasparo de Procida, but the marriage was annulled by her father and she was betrothed in 1492 to Giovanni Sforza.’
      • ‘He said in the absence of national legislation, the church is planning to annul marriages in which a partner has been deceived by another who contracted HIV / Aids before marriage.’
      • ‘In 1997 an Orange County, Calif., judge refused to annul the marriage of Joshua Vecchione simply because he had had a sex change.’
      • ‘A MAN in Wuhan, in Central China's Hubei Province, applied many times to the local civil affairs bureau to annul his marriage with his pregnant wife, finally suing the bureau four months after the baby was born.’
      • ‘Divorce takes place when a man pronounces a formula or when a religious judge annuls the marriage at the instigation of the husband or wife.’
      • ‘He wanted to break his attachment, annul the marriage.’
      • ‘Daddy's going to find where you got married and have the priest annul your marriage.’
      • ‘Under Lian - imprecation - the woman can annul the marriage if the husband makes a charge of promiscuity and is unable to follow it up with evidence.’
      • ‘He had his marriage annulled by the Catholic Church.’
      • ‘The marriage was annulled in March 1152 on grounds of consanguinity.’
      • ‘For more than a hundred years legal loopholes have allowed thousands of couples to annul their marriages.’
      • ‘Lucrezia's first marriage was annulled on the grounds of non-consummation; her husband was lucky to escape with his life.’
      • ‘In an effort to annul an arranged marriage, Apu tells his mother he wed Marge.’
      • ‘And they found out that his first marriage was not annulled - was not legally divorced yet.’
      • ‘Martin's unsatisfied wife nearly annulled their marriage because of his impotence.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French anuller, from late Latin annullare, from ad- ‘to’ + nullum ‘nothing’.

Pronunciation

annul

/əˈnʌl/