Main definitions of angle in English

: angle1angle2

angle1

noun

  • 1The space (usually measured in degrees) between two intersecting lines or surfaces at or close to the point where they meet.

    ‘in any triangle, the longest side is opposite the largest angle’
    ‘spring-loaded hinges open the doors to any angle up to 90°’
    • ‘Bend your elbows at 90-degree angles and keep them close to your body.’
    • ‘Finally, objects subtending an angle less than 5 degrees cannot be detected irrespective of the L-receptor contrast value.’
    • ‘Figure 1 shows elevation angles for latitude 82 degrees north.’
    • ‘The better the defender's peripheral vision, the closer the angle between man and ball approaches 180 degrees.’
    • ‘Some others may have been produced by sapping or sub-surface flows, giving shape to short stubby channels that join at 90 degree angles.’
    • ‘The line must have clean-outs with tight fitting caps every 75 feet or less, or where the line has angles greater than 45 degrees.’
    • ‘The shear angle is the angle of intersection between the tangent to the waveform at position s and the tangent to the waveform at the base of the flagellum.’
    • ‘The angles between two intersecting straight lines are equal.’
    • ‘I found it, I measured it, and, well, I'm sorry, people, but an obtuse angle of 134 degrees just ain't a corner.’
    • ‘Bring the weights back down until your elbows form 90-degree angles.’
    • ‘Reticles are in the second focal plane, so as power is changed the angle subtended by the space between lines varies.’
    • ‘Extension involves the triceps muscle, and when fully extended the arm should be in a straight line - the elbow angle at 180 degrees.’
    • ‘Both slopes intersect resting plane at angles varying between 50 and 70 degrees.’
    • ‘Three hollow rays diverge at angles of 120 degrees from the central part.’
    • ‘The vertical time axis is the product of time and the speed of light so that world lines of light rays leaving the origin make a forty-five degree angle with each space axis.’
    • ‘For the three line locus we are given a point P and three directed lines a, b, and c drawn to meet at given angles, three fixed straight lines.’
    • ‘Located where the bisectors of a triangle's three angles intersect, the incenter is the center of the largest circle that can be inscribed inside that triangle.’
    • ‘The ICC experts say Muralitharan bends his arm to an angle of 14 degrees, and is proposing to allow a bend of up to 15 degrees.’
    • ‘The lateral axes (first order shoots) diverge from the main trunk at angles of 80 degrees.’
    • ‘The curve value is the number of degrees formed by the angle of intersection of these perpendiculars.’
    1. 1.1A corner, especially an external projection or an internal recess of a part of a building or other structure.
      ‘a skylight in the angle of the roof’
      • ‘Tonight of all nights you can expect bars and restaurants to bedeck every angle with TVs and those TVs to be tuned into the national elections.’
      • ‘She examined the floor and all angles of the doorway and ladder, looking for any kind of plausible explanation.’
      • ‘Exposed structure, unusual angles, and leaning walls give the building a noninstitutional energy.’
      • ‘There are no angles or corners in the enclosure with which to orient yourself.’
      • ‘The south front of the curtain, overlooking the crag, is tower-free but the south-east angle is projected outside to create a sort of bastion.’
      • ‘Because corners or other defined angles are the hardest ones to fit, select stones for those areas first and set them in place.’
      • ‘Scrim joints at internal and external angles (except where coincident with a metal bead).’
      • ‘The sharp angle breaks up the structure, making it feel lighter.’
      • ‘Even so, Leroy has created a lovely hotel, and one that's quite unlike any other - a mix of wacky curves and angles, secret spaces and roaring log fires.’
      • ‘On the other side of campus, the sun beats on new red-brick buildings with modern angles and minimalist steeples.’
      • ‘It was all tan brick and glass, the epitome of modern chic with sharp angles and vaulted ceilings.’
      • ‘The walls had rounded angles with semicircular projecting bastions for artillery with an entrance on the south side.’
      • ‘With its metal projections and angles, wooden recesses and thin walls it has a serendipitous quality.’
      • ‘If the nest is lined with soft or rotting bits of wood secured in the internal angles, the pair will derive endless pleasure from reducing it to crumbs.’
      • ‘As he turned an angle of the building, he heard a sound as of a door gently closed, and saw in the darkness, indistinctly, the figure of a man, which instantly disappeared among the trees of the lawn.’
      • ‘Looking at Tony Bevan's work almost makes your own neck ache, such is the empathy one feels with the contorted angles and distorted structures of his heads.’
    2. 1.2A measure of the inclination of one line or surface with respect to another.
      ‘sloping at an angle of 33° to the horizontal’
      • ‘The best way to accomplish that is to play the ball a little forward in your stance and match your shoulders to the angle of the slope at address.’
      • ‘The tilt of the shoulders and the angle at which you hold your blade, it tells not only the direction of the strike, but what type of strike as well.’
      • ‘This one is at a slight angle to the building, unlike the one by the entrance, but is no less imposing because of it.’
      • ‘As you enter Turns 3 and 4, there are several humps that can upset the car if you enter the corner at the wrong angle.’
      • ‘Ice surface slope angles were measured using a surveyor's clinometer.’
      • ‘The helical axis was tilted by an angle of 35° with respect to the central plane.’
      • ‘For example, at each location on the globe, the geomagnetic field lines intersect the Earth's surface at a specific angle of inclination.’
      • ‘His car flew into the corner at an incredible angle, and as Tsukamoto assured himself of his win he looked out the window…’
      • ‘In principle, if a ship had a clock keeping Greenwich time, the navigator could measure the angle of the Sun to note local noon and compare it to the clock.’
      • ‘The projected angle from the base of the fork suggests a gap would have remained, allowing a slim person to pass through.’
      • ‘The location of the focal spot within the bfp determines the inclination angle under which the collimated beam impinges on the upper surface of a microscope slide.’
      • ‘The architect squeezed a labyrinth of wood-paneled corridors at odd angles within the already-small rooms.’
      • ‘We had pushed the piano into the TV room the day before and now it sat toward the corner at an odd angle to the rest of the room.’
      • ‘He's based this idea on a study of the angle, or inclination, of asteroid orbits.’
      • ‘If tilt is assumed to be the sole cause, the C-terminal helix of the peptide would need to be at a 300 angle with respect to the bilayer normal.’
      • ‘He rolled balls of varying size and weight down slopes with varying angles of incline. He showed that an object thrown into the air falls to the earth along a parabola.’
      • ‘However, the girl in question gave a silky smile, slanting her shoulders at a flattering angle, and winked at Spike flirtatiously.’
      • ‘Placards not yet on duty are held at a slope, at rakish angles over shoulders.’
      • ‘The precise angles at which these lines lie are also difficult to measure.’
      • ‘It also took groups of points, formed angles from the lines between them, and compared the measure of those angles.’
    3. 1.3A position from which something is viewed or along which it travels or acts, typically as measured by its inclination from an implicit horizontal or vertical baseline.
      ‘from this angle Maggie could not see Naomi's face’
      • ‘The silk medium makes a filter effect on the pieces; viewing from angles other than directly in front ‘smudges’ the paintings.’
      • ‘You can solve most background problems by moving the subject, the camera or changing the angle of view.’
      • ‘The sphere was scanned with a 1 mm step size, and the THz image was obtained for 18 different projection angles.’
      • ‘The mirror deflects a laser beam by rapidly switching its angle of orientation, building up the picture pixel by pixel.’
      • ‘Some of this can be alleviated by changing the camera angle - the overhead view being the most useful.’
      • ‘Despite the team's expressed desire to create new forms in snow, the structure from certain angles had a traditional igloolike appearance.’
      • ‘Horizontal and vertical viewing angles are also fairly poor, with the screen looking washed out at you move up and down and going dark as you move to the side.’
      • ‘He's a master of visual flash, positioning cameras at myriad angles to enhance every car crash, explosion or close-up gun shot.’
      • ‘The camera angles were outstanding and provided one of the most intimate viewing experiences you will ever find for a show of this magnitude.’
      • ‘They used to come at teams wave upon wave, using the width of the field to vary the angle of assault and building up such speed and crispness in their passing that when the time came for an incursion it would be a sudden thrust.’
      • ‘It's composed of shots of the interior of the building from various angles, with a natural sound track; it's a nice, simple film.’
      • ‘For someone like me, who has to bring his eyes very close to the monitor to read the text, the low viewing angles will pose a problem.’
      • ‘Steven McDonnell added a free before he scored a great individual point from the tightest of angles in the right corner of the pitch.’
      • ‘In bright sunlight, the blocks and shadows play curious visual tricks on the eye as you view the structure from different angles.’
      • ‘Also, the colour of the denomination numeral shifts between gold and green when the banknote is viewed at different angles.’
      • ‘He moved the camera to a lower angle as I switched positions.’
      • ‘I spent years memorizing every strategy, learning how to read gun angles, bullet projections, all of it!’
      • ‘For example, the left-hand image above is a photograph of a flat wall of a building taken from an angle.’
      • ‘The game uses both first- and third-person camera angles to view the action.’
      • ‘They had probably seen planes hitting buildings from a dozen angles.’
  • 2A particular way of approaching or considering an issue or problem.

    ‘discussing the problems from every conceivable angle’
    ‘he always had a fresh angle on life’
    • ‘And then I thought, well, this is a different angle on it.’
    • ‘But we approach a lot of issues from different angles and different viewpoints, and I respect him for that.’
    • ‘Do you reject this idea because you've thought through the issue, considered it from various angles, possibly testing it and then rejecting it?’
    • ‘But, to the extent that I had any angle on this issue, it was from interviewing current and retired career officers over the last year.’
    • ‘I approached reproductive health issues from two angles.’
    • ‘Intel has a strong commitment to employee wellbeing and approaches the issue from two angles.’
    • ‘For me, I guess the core reason was ‘fascination’ - things firing my imagination and integrating that with my angle on approaching the world.’
    • ‘If his latest drama promises to take a new angle on a popular political debate, his other new stage work, The Don, is, he believes, his most controversial.’
    • ‘There followed a novel which was praised by Taki in the Spectator for its angle on the Western malaise.’
    • ‘Clay considers a new angle on the control of community structure.’
    • ‘I knew people like Liam in the children's home, it gives me a fresher angle on him than most have.’
    • ‘Try approaching the issue from many different angles.’
    • ‘I have a weird angle on things and people find it odd.’
    • ‘It might help us get a new angle on what we have here in Saltaire as well as finding out more about the other World Heritage sites.’
    • ‘Diana also points out a different angle to consider.’
    • ‘When the subject matter is childhood itself, everyone has an angle on it, be they a child or an adult: it doesn't matter which end of the telescope you look through.’
    • ‘Whatever the issue of the day's, he's got an angle on it.’
    • ‘Another angle on this comes from a writer called Johann Christoph Arnold.’
    • ‘For the historically minded, the Glenbow Museum offers a different angle on those good old boys of Canadian art, the Group of Seven.’
    • ‘In Masters week it comes into its own; a special supplement is produced every day with every conceivable angle on the great tournament on its doorstep meticulously covered.’
    perspective, way of looking at something, point of view, viewpoint, standpoint, position, side, aspect, slant, direction, approach, outlook, light
    View synonyms
  • 3Astrology
    [often with modifier] Each of the four cardinal points of a chart, from which the first, fourth, seventh, and tenth houses extend anticlockwise respectively.

    • ‘Each quadrant is then bound by two of the four angles of the horoscope.’
    • ‘‘Places of familiarity’ are the signs of the zodiac or angles in the chart which reinforce a planet's natural disposition.’
    • ‘The final grand trine comes from the dark angle or the 4th house - the lowest point in heaven.’
    • ‘The horary chart had fixed signs on all four angles.’
    • ‘The Midheaven, or MC is one of the most important angles in the birth chart.’
  • 4[mass noun] Angle iron or a similar constructional material made of another metal.

    ‘the supporting frame is usually of aluminium angle bolted together’
    • ‘Usually, the steel angle or steel lintel is below the stone surround.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Direct or incline at an angle.

    ‘he angled his chair so that he could watch her’
    • ‘She rolled her eyes and wondered why she even asked when she saw him standing a little further away, angling his camera for a shot.’
    • ‘The basketball players didn't keep their feet parallel; they angled them toward the outside.’
    • ‘Jacinta turned away from Brooks, shifting her body in the chair to distance and angle herself physically away from him.’
    • ‘Stone did as instructed and angled the helicopter toward the aircraft's last known location.’
    • ‘She angled her stride directly to him, and before he could get even a ‘Hello’ past his lips she slapped him across the cheek.’
    • ‘They walked through the main corridor and deeper into the headquarters for three minutes before Vanessa started angling him towards another corridor.’
    • ‘She looked at me sidelong, angling her head towards me.’
    • ‘Then, angling her flashlight to direct the beam ahead of her, she carefully inspected the wall to her right until she found a hole the size of a nickel disguised in the carvings.’
    • ‘Chris angled the overhead microphone toward his lips.’
    • ‘‘We're on our way,’ Valo said, angling the freighter towards a huge starship.’
    • ‘When the show went out about 6 weeks later I was surprised at just how much they had angled those cameras onto the people in our group.’
    • ‘After more vertical drilling at the same location next summer, the main hole will be angled off toward the northeast to pierce the fault zone itself.’
    • ‘Hold a pair of dumbbells loosely in your palms and angle them slightly toward your head.’
    • ‘‘Try putting your foot a little more toward the edge and angle it a bit,’ the guy called.’
    • ‘You should also slightly angle the sitter's chair so that one shoulder is closer to the camera and get the subject to turn their head to face the camera again.’
    • ‘And don't angle that camera up to those high ceilings - I haven't figured out how to get up there with the roller brush yet.’
    • ‘Once in place it was very secure and, as the screen can be angled in any direction, it was easy to see.’
    • ‘You need to angle the branches towards a prop, whether it be a fence, wires or another plant.’
    • ‘A sudden sound cut him off and he angled his gaze towards the curtain that Aja yanked open.’
    • ‘I angled the visor toward the other fellow's hands.’
    tilt, slant
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[no object, with adverbial of direction]Move or be inclined at an angle.
      ‘still the rain angles down’
      • ‘But when the soap-opera sun rose, it angled to the left.’
      • ‘Through the telescope that morning, I could see the surface of the Moon receding, curving back, angling away from the Sun and around the lunar horizon and out of sight.’
      • ‘Northern Quest moved up on the inside through the turn, then angled out for running room as he quickly consumed Exciting Fanfare's lead.’
      • ‘Her red hair gleamed in the light of the late afternoon sun angling down into the courtyard.’
      • ‘One of the spiny legs went into the air, angling down for him, but he moved his sword, made with the strange black stone from the Dragon Hills, and easily cleaved it off mid-joint.’
      • ‘As the two bay mares dueled in the lane, Finery angled to the outside following a ground-saving trip midpack and kicked home in the final strides to edge Madeira Mist.’
      • ‘He angled out into the lane and easily collared the leader, then proceeded to extend his lead down the stretch for his third Group / Grade 1 victory of the year.’
      • ‘It is a luxuriant depiction of competition: from the tops of the trees down to the river's edge, the canvas crackles with jostling leaves angling toward the morning sun.’
      • ‘The cab chose a proper moment to angle into the parking area where they were standing.’
      • ‘Adriana judged they were moving eastward, by hints of the sun that angled down through the high canopy of branches.’
    2. 1.2[with object]Present (information) to reflect a particular view or have a particular focus.
      ‘angle your answer so that it is relevant to the job for which you are applying’
      • ‘Our news stories will be angled differently, and the upside of having lots of media publications is that many angles get covered.’
      • ‘It soon became apparent what the 16PF questions were angled towards, and some of the multiple choice replies were quite restrictive.’

Phrases

  • at an angle

    • In a direction or at an inclination markedly different from parallel, vertical, or horizontal with respect to an implicit baseline.

      ‘she wore her beret at an angle’
      ‘an armchair was drawn up at an angle to his desk’
      • ‘The man tilted the book upwards at an angle so I couldn't see the contents and turned back the cover.’
      • ‘I would suggest using bricks, which, if inserted at an angle, can also be very pleasing to the eye.’
      • ‘Any headstone, old or new, that moves has to be secured by having steel rods drilled through it at an angle, rooting it firmly.’
      • ‘It would start off tilted at an angle and would gradually straighten up as the glasses filled.’
      • ‘Rocks that lie at an angle must have been tilted after the sediments were consolidated.’
      • ‘Other versions attach to the wall or descend from the ceiling vertically or at an angle.’
      • ‘This is uncomfortable, so instead I cross my legs and face the computer at an angle.’
      • ‘Due to the fact that the main shaft was steeply sloping rather than vertical, the ropes were also rigged at an angle.’
      • ‘Instead, a portion of the stick slid down and tilted at an angle, like a hockey stick.’
      • ‘The effect on light is the same - as it enters the glass at an angle, it bends in one direction.’
      at a slant, on the slant, not straight, sloping, slanting, slanted, slantwise, slant, oblique, leaning, inclining, inclined, angled, cambered, canted
      askew, skew, lopsided, crooked, tilting, tilted, atilt, dipping, out of true, out of line
      squint
      declivitous, declivous, acclivitous, acclivous
      View synonyms
  • from all angles

    • From every direction or point of view.

      ‘they come shooting at us from all angles’
      • ‘Killian and Thomas Tallon were about to board Killian Dad's boat to view the Seagull II from all angles.’
      • ‘They are three superb footballers, they can shoot on sight, score from all angles and we are really up against it.’
      • ‘He was summarily attacked from all angles, mostly by women.’
      • ‘However, although this is fine when looking from the front I feel that the artist hasn't fully considered his creation from all angles.’
      • ‘He studied the problem, considering it from all angles.’
      • ‘Plant to one side or the other, looking at the new tree from all angles to make sure it looks good from every direction.’
      • ‘Experienced correspondents will not spout the other side's view, they will assess the story from all angles.’
      • ‘There are good points to each side and we need more unbiased people that are willing to look at them from all angles.’
      • ‘Democrats, as a whole, love to be able to see things from all angles.’
      • ‘People can look at it from all angles and draw their own conclusions.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French, from Latin angulus corner.

Pronunciation:

angle

/ˈaŋɡ(ə)l/

Main definitions of angle in English

: angle1angle2

angle2

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1Fish with a rod and line.

    ‘there are no big fish left to angle for’
    • ‘This piece of kit is obviously designed for world-wide distribution and seems to be the ideal tool for all lure anglers whether they angle in salt or fresh-water.’
    • ‘If you like to go fishing, chances are you've angled for trout.’
    • ‘For the urban poor, the storm waters bring a unique opportunity to angle for fish in the swollen canals criss-crossing the city.’
    • ‘Sports fisherman Tomas Plattig, who has been angling on the Capilano for 25 years, said he became concerned this week after noticing the shopping carts in the river.’
    • ‘Normally tranquil Morden Hall Park has been beset over the past months by fisherman angling in the River Wandle, even though a by-law bans fishing because of conservation reasons.’
    • ‘At sea three more fatalities occurred from people angling from boats and rock fishing off our coastline.’
    • ‘Stepping back in time, Edison broke a bamboo fishing rod while angling near Rawlins and that night he threw it on the campfire.’
    • ‘Even so, carp anglers have been theorising on the use of ‘specials’ for as long as people have angled for cypry, and the carp bait industry is huge.’
    • ‘When possible, the field crew angled in the vicinity of the fish they were tracking, and on several occasions captured striped bass in this manner.’
    • ‘Afterwards, Pa pointed out a good spot and Adam settled down on a large rock to angle for catfish.’
    • ‘Salmon and sardine would be better fish to angle for.’
  • 2Seek something desired by indirectly prompting someone to offer it.

    ‘Ralph had begun to angle for an invitation’
    • ‘Labor - and some trial lawyers - will angle for more money, plus a government backstop for the trust.’
    • ‘You tried to angle for Dylan so you, of course, failed.’
    • ‘From Russia to Libya to Venezuela, investment terms and tax regimes are becoming less favorable as governments angle for a bigger cut of the oil wealth.’
    • ‘After spending the last two seasons angling for a move the Premiership his form and free transfer status instead look to have led him to La Liga champions Barcelona.’
    • ‘O'Neal never has angled to have a say in personnel moves, but he's not happy with the quality of the players around him.’
    try to get, seek to obtain, make a bid for, aim for, cast about for, cast around for, cast round for, solicit, hope for, look for
    fish for, be after
    View synonyms

noun

Archaic
  • A fish hook.

    ‘you will be pleased too, if you find a Trout at one of our Angles’

Origin

Old English angul (noun); the verb dates from late Middle English.

Pronunciation:

angle

/ˈaŋɡ(ə)l/

Main definitions of angle in English

: angle1angle2

Angle

noun

  • A member of a Germanic people, originally inhabitants of what is now Schleswig-Holstein, who came to England in the 5th century ad. The Angles founded kingdoms in Mercia, Northumbria, and East Anglia and gave their name to England and the English.

    • ‘I have always understood the Angles, Saxons and Jutes were Germanic tribes who moved to Britain following the retreat of the Roman Empire.’
    • ‘This explanation sounds plausible, but we need to be wary of assuming that the Danes and East Angles still thought of themselves as fundamentally different from one another.’
    • ‘His great-grandson Edward began as king of the West Saxons, became king of Mercia after the death of his sister who ruled there, and took over the kingdom of the East Angles after a series of military campaigns.’
    • ‘In an attempt to track the genes associated with common diseases, the University of Oxford is conducting a new project to find genetic links to invading populations of Vikings, Saxons and Angles.’
    • ‘In the eleventh century, the Scottish kingdom was a politico-ethnic patchwork of Scots, Picts, Angles, and Britons.’
    • ‘The tribes we're following - the Angles, Saxons, and Jutes - lived on the coast of West Germany and Denmark and spoke various Frisian dialects.’
    • ‘The Angles eventually took the remainder of England as far north as the Firth of Forth, including the future Edinburgh and the Scottish lowlands’.’
    • ‘But her report says the citadel ‘puts Stirling firmly on the map at a time when Picts, Scots, Britons and Angles ruled their separate kingdoms in the four quarters of mainland Scotland’.’
    • ‘The Romans, the Angles, the Normans - and, more recently, the industrial revolution - all left their mark.’
    • ‘From these and other scraps came the long-accepted story of the Anglo-Saxon takeover of Britain: of raids by Angles, Saxons, and Jutes from north Germany and Denmark, followed by piecemeal settlement and conquest.’
    • ‘The Angles held Gregory in particularly high esteem, and traced their conversion to his missionary efforts in 597 A.D., even though Roman Britain had seen Christianity hundreds of years earlier.’
    • ‘The collapse of Roman rule in the early fifth century ended urban life, as groups of Germanic Angles, Jutes, and Saxons carved the country into tribal enclaves and later created the heptarchy.’
    • ‘The name of the country and the term ‘English’ derive from the Old English word for one of the three Germanic peoples that invaded the British Isles in the fifth century C. E., the Angles.’
    • ‘With the departure of the Romans, the British Isles were invaded by a succession of warlike peoples from the European mainland, including the Angles, Saxons, and Jutes; there were also persistent Danish raids.’
    • ‘To the south, in England, heathenism still reigned in the various kingdoms ruled by the Jutes, Angles, and Saxons, and pagan gods were worshipped.’
    • ‘Yet Angles and Saxons were settlers from the continent, and for 250 years before the Norman Conquest Britain and Ireland were subject to more invasion and settlement from Scandinavia.’
    • ‘The story of Yorkshire dialect began in earnest in the fifth century AD with the arrival on these shores of the Angles, Saxons and other Germanic migrants from what is now northern Germany and southern Scandinavia.’
    • ‘We could then be clear whether the ‘aboriginal’ British are the Picts, Scots and Welsh, or whether such recent immigrants as Angles, Saxons, Danes and suchlike also qualify.’
    • ‘These fierce and savage warriors actually consisted of Jutes, Friesians, Angles and Saxons.’
    • ‘The Angles, Saxons, Danes, Frisians and other invaders intermarried with the existing Romano-British Celts, Romans, Jutes, Gauls, Greeks and Lombards.’

Origin

From Latin Anglus, (plural) Angli the people of Angul, a district of Schleswig (now in northern Germany), so named because of its shape; of Germanic origin, related to Old English angul (see angle). Compare with English.

Pronunciation:

Angle

/ˈaŋɡ(ə)l/