Definition of ancestry in English:

ancestry

noun

  • 1One's family or ethnic descent.

    ‘he was proud of his Irish ancestry’
    • ‘There's no acting in our family ancestry, so the path to it wasn't clear at all.’
    • ‘To a large extent, the linguistic classification corresponds to the historical records regarding the ancestry of East Asians.’
    • ‘Our teeth tell us something about our ancestry, ethnic background, and age, our environment and our health.’
    • ‘Ann was a descendant of a family that could trace its ancestry back to the Norman Conquest.’
    • ‘My father's family traces its ancestry there back 900 years.’
    • ‘Having been raised in an Italian ancestry family of ten children I thought I was pretty used to chaos.’
    • ‘McGhie traced his ancestry back by recording the names, birth years and birthplaces of his ancestors.’
    • ‘The Davis and the Somes families traced their ancestry to Cape Ann's earliest settlers.’
    • ‘Presumably because of their Jewish ancestry, the family fled to England in 1939.’
    • ‘Once they're gone, information about your ancestry along with interesting family lore is also gone forever unless the knowledge has been passed on to the next generation.’
    • ‘Today, any Jew - regardless of ethnic ancestry - who wishes to live in Israel is entitled to full and equal Israeli citizenship.’
    • ‘It has been in the Teen family and its ancestry since 1886.’
    • ‘So she has been following up her family ancestry.’
    • ‘The result is a genealogist's dream, for not only does he sketch the families, he also records their ancestry and their ties to others in the county.’
    • ‘It's hardly a big number - only about 1.5% of those claiming a specific ethnic ancestry named Scotch-Irish.’
    • ‘Many of these families traced their ancestry to the earliest English settlers of this country's oldest fishing port.’
    • ‘Local legends and some native historians trace their ancestry to the biblical figure Yafith, the son of Noah.’
    • ‘In the ancestry of our family, there had only ever been one child - hence, only one cross.’
    • ‘A criollo in Argentina is a person or a family descended from Spanish ancestry, in other words, no added mixture of non-Spanish blood.’
    • ‘A group of nomad families sharing a common ancestry is more likely to deal with the challenges of the desert.’
    ancestors, forebears, forefathers, progenitors, antecedents
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    1. 1.1 The evolutionary or genetic line of descent of an animal or plant.
      ‘the ancestry of the rose is extremely complicated’
      • ‘But it still sits in our DNA, one of many useless remnants testifying to our evolutionary ancestry.’
      • ‘Pandas are carnivores because they belong to a set of animals with a common ancestry - true bears.’
      • ‘Estimates of hybrid frequency are conservative because of the limited number of genetic markers available to characterize genetic ancestry.’
      • ‘Simplicity and antiquity of green algae have long been accepted as evidence of their apparent ancestry to land plants.’
      • ‘When a coalescence event occurs, two lines of ancestry are picked, uniformly at random, and are coalesced to form one resulting line.’
      • ‘Lastly, Feduccia advocated the notion that convergent evolution may make the ancestry of birds unknowable.’
      • ‘Humans did not evolve out of an animal ancestry.’
      • ‘Evolutionists sought the ancestry of the tetrapods among the lobe-finned fishes.’
      • ‘Closely related species will tend to share more characters through common ancestry than through independent evolution.’
      • ‘Evolutionists do not feel compelled to prove their claim that similarity necessarily means common evolutionary ancestry - they assume it.’
      • ‘Our closest relatives, the chimpanzee, the bonobo or pygmy chimpanzee, and the gorilla share with us a common ancestry of genes and genome organization.’
      • ‘Today's tuberous begonias are highly bred plants of South American ancestry.’
      • ‘The bitterest pill to swallow for any Christian who attempts to ‘make peace’ with Darwin is the presumed animal ancestry of man.’
      • ‘Coalescent theory describes the genetic ancestry of a sample and provides the tools for the analysis of intraspecies molecular data.’
      • ‘As a supplement to comparisons among natural populations, experimental evolution offers the advantages of known ancestries and constant, reproducible selective environments.’
      • ‘As we have often pointed out, similarity does not mean proof of common ancestry or evolutionary relatedness.’
      • ‘These are aspects of the body that are claimed to be useless leftovers from our animal ancestry.’
      • ‘Evolution deals with the common ancestry of life on earth.’
      • ‘Evolution cannot be right because scientists do not agree on the mechanism for natural selection and ancestry of various species.’
      • ‘The results of a four-year, £10m-plus project to crack the genetic code of chickens will be released this week, along with a full analysis of their evolution and ancestry.’
      congenital characteristics, congenital traits, genetics, genetic make-up, genes
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  • 2The origin or background of something.

    ‘the book traces the ancestry of women's poetry’
    • ‘This is because the African Republic and the Islamic Union have a common ancestry that originated in Northern Africa several thousand years ago.’
    • ‘Neither hotel, it should be said, is shy about installing bright Scandinavian mod-cons to the detriment of its historical ancestry.’
    • ‘This class is also called ‘tinkers’: whether this name has a common ancestry for both books or this is just a coincidence, I'm not sure.’
    • ‘I believe that reading children's pictorial books that depict the ancestry of different continents with children can make global education meaningful.’
    • ‘Seen in this light, contemporary Taiwanese nationalism belongs to a political family with a well-established ancestry.’

Origin

Middle English: alteration of Old French ancesserie, from ancestre (see ancestor).

Pronunciation

ancestry

/ˈansɛstri/