Definition of amuse-bouche in English:

amuse-bouche

nounPlural amuse-bouches

  • another term for amuse-gueule
    • ‘The amuse-bouche, or welcome from the chef, was gently placed in front of us.’
    • ‘His is too astute to fall for this and we, in the meantime, should simply be glad of his consistently high quality over every three course dinner, five choices for each course and, de rigueur these days, two classy amuse-bouches.’
    • ‘First an amuse-bouche, a little mouthful of intent.’
    • ‘We had been served amuse-bouches in the past, but no such luck this time.’
    • ‘We had an amuse-bouche of lobster bisque with skate, a good strong flavour to get the juices flowing.’
    • ‘An amuse-bouche of (farmed) smoked salmon wrapped around asparagus (madly out of season) was served too cold.’
    • ‘The chef sends out a substantial amuse-bouche.’
    • ‘We started with a trio of excellent amuse-bouches—haddock and goat's cheese in filo pastry followed by a small tart containing quail's eggs with hollandaise sauce, and rounded off with cherry tomatoes filled with beef.’
    • ‘True to form, an amuse-bouche of gazpacho and curry with crab was delivered to the table and was a great kick-off.’
    • ‘But when the amuse-bouche arrived, I really did try my best, discreetly balancing my drugstore notebook on my thigh.’
    • ‘Every meal begins with an amuse-bouche presented on a little white tray.’
    • ‘The resulting amuse-bouche yielded a delicate blend of seasonings and tiny bits of crunchy vegetables, gracing a plate sprinkled with fresh herbs.’
    • ‘Our waiter noticed that one person at the table was not eating the amuse-bouche of shrimp, avocado mousse and citrus.’
    • ‘On two visits we received a demitasse of creamy soup accompanied by an airy cheese puff as an amuse-bouche.’
    • ‘There was a tasty house amuse-bouche of white lentil potato fritter.’
    • ‘Nothing beats a start to the evening like an amuse-bouche designed to tantalise his senses, leaving him wanting more.’
    • ‘Both visits started with an amuse-bouche in an eggshell.’
    • ‘An amuse-bouche of a little glass of gazpacho arrived, pale orange and subtly flavoured.’
    • ‘Before our starters arrived, we were presented with a few amuse-bouches of melba toast with goats' cheese and red pepper, and salmon tartare tartlets.’
    • ‘My vote goes for the parmesan seasoned with a little balsamic vinegar, a simple and delicious amuse-bouche.’

Origin

French, literally ‘amuse mouth’.

Pronunciation

amuse-bouche

/əˌmjuːzˈbuːʃ//əˌmuːzˈbuːʃ/