Definition of amiable in English:

amiable

adjective

  • Having or displaying a friendly and pleasant manner.

    ‘the amiable young man greeted me enthusiastically’
    • ‘I'm sad that such noble, amiable and inventive creatures could be treated so cruelly.’
    • ‘Dale agreed, finding it difficult not to warm to the amiable fisherman.’
    • ‘Anyway, I found Andrea to be a perfectly amiable person, but that was not a universal view.’
    • ‘He described him Mr Reid as an amiable person who wanted to learn the basics of the religion.’
    • ‘He is an amiable person, but very disorganised, and this often leads to frustration on the part of staff, and friction.’
    • ‘Most of the time, however, the two rivals were amiable and pleased with each other's achievements.’
    • ‘He's an amiable if laconic sort, seemingly uninterested in talking about himself.’
    • ‘The result is that amiable but gullible Arthur finds himself fleeced by friends and strangers alike.’
    • ‘Balard had a kind and amiable personality, to which students responded warmly.’
    • ‘Finally, an amiable person pulled up in an old pickup truck and let the poor man in.’
    • ‘He was blonde haired, blue eyed, and perhaps one of the most amiable people in the town.’
    • ‘Of course he would dispute that, though in the most amiable terms.’
    • ‘Jane Galt is a charming hostess, and her salon is a vastly more amiable affair than I imagine Rand's were.’
    • ‘If he is allowed to continue, others with less amiable intentions will follow.’
    • ‘The film thrives on the chemistry between its two likeable leads, while the rest of the cast is funny and amiable.’
    • ‘She was a very good looking woman, with an amiable and warm personality, but I didn't know her personally.’
    • ‘We suspect that it was a very amiable meeting because they are both decent people who know the score.’
    • ‘Of all Europe's princes today, Albert Alexandre Louis Pierre must be one of the most amiable and likeable.’
    • ‘Always amiable and frequently hilarious, future triumphs on the comedy circuit might not be that much of a tall order.’
    • ‘A most amiable and kindly man, he was held in very high esteem and was a noted character in the area.’
    friendly, affable, amicable, cordial
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (originally in the senses ‘kind’, and ‘lovely, lovable’): via Old French from late Latin amicabilis ‘amicable’. The current sense, influenced by modern French aimable ‘trying to please’, dates from the mid 18th century.

Pronunciation

amiable

/ˈeɪmɪəb(ə)l/