Definition of amerce in English:

amerce

verb

English Law
historical
  • See amercement

    • ‘Many archaic French usages continue in the legal usage of England, such as: amerce, implead, malfeasance, tort.’
    • ‘If he does not appear in person at that court session, or the next one or the one after that, he is to be amerced at the discretion of the bailiffs.’
    • ‘If the bailiffs find anyone in contravention of this, or if any reputable man makes a complaint about such an offence, and the accused is convicted then he must be heavily amerced by the bailiffs and any complainant is to be awarded damages.’
    • ‘In 1309 he was amerced by the leet court for using non-standard measures to sell goods.’
    • ‘Earls and barons shall not be amerced except through their peers, and only in accordance with the degree of the offense.’

Pronunciation

amerce

/əˈməːs/