Main definitions of Amazon in English

: Amazon1Amazon2

Amazon1

proper noun

  • A river in South America, flowing over 6,683 km (4,150 miles) through Peru, Colombia, and Brazil into the Atlantic Ocean. It drains two fifths of the continent and in terms of water flow it is the largest river in the world.

Origin

The river bore various names after it was first encountered by Europeans in 1500 and was finally called Amazon after a legendary race of female warriors believed to live on its banks.

Pronunciation:

Amazon

/ˈaməz(ə)n/

Main definitions of Amazon in English

: Amazon1Amazon2

Amazon2

noun

  • 1A member of a legendary race of female warriors believed by the ancient Greeks to exist in Scythia or elsewhere on the edge of the known world.

    • ‘Perhaps the most widely known of legendary women warriors are the Greek Amazons and the Nordic Valkyries.’
    • ‘What makes all this more ironic is that these exhausted women were the original Amazons, the warrior caste Alexander supposedly would not fight.’
    • ‘While Boadicea was a warrior woman, the Amazons were not, primarily because their existence is wholly fictitious.’
    • ‘Still, there seems to be a kind of secretive admiration of the Amazons by the male myth makers.’
    • ‘Theseus defeated the Amazons in battle and took one of their captive leaders as his wife or concubine.’
    • ‘Some radical historians, Bacher said, believed the tribe was descended from seafaring Scythian Amazons fleeing the encroachment of imperial Greece.’
    • ‘Early map-makers were happy to leave blanks for terra incognita or to stock those empty spaces with headless cannibals, giant monopeds, Amazons and dragons.’
    • ‘In the 5th century political symbolism was couched in mythological terms, and the battles of gods and giants, Greeks and Amazons or Trojans, and Lapiths and centaurs stood for the historical battles of the Persian Wars.’
    • ‘The ancient Herodotus thought the Amazons did exist, but were extinct by the time that he lived.’
    • ‘The ancient Greeks believed that there had been Amazons and celebrated their victory over them.’
    • ‘Hippolyta is the conquered queen of Amazons who marries Theseus and returns to Athens with him.’
    • ‘These legendary Amazons appear in several Greek fables.’
    • ‘The very idea of the Amazons, of ruthless women warriors who live apart from men, excites people at a deep level.’
    • ‘The first theme relates to the Christian iconography of Charity, and the eighteenth-century cult of Nature, as we shall see; the second to classical mythology about virgin goddesses and warrior Amazons.’
    • ‘Eleanor and some of her entourage appeared before the barons dressed as Amazons, declaring their willingness to fight for Christ.’
    1. 1.1 A very tall and strong or athletic woman.
      • ‘She was not taller than me, perhaps, but an amazon among most her age and gender.’
      • ‘He's a small man - four feet tall, I'd say - with an Amazon for a wife.’
      • ‘They are gorgeous, sexy, and tough as nails - amazons with attitude.’
      • ‘Contrary to the myth that older women don't play sports, these Amazons all happen to be over 30.’
  • 2A parrot, typically green, found in Central and South America.

    • ‘A very high proportion of Amazon parrots are threatened with extinction because of their slow rate of reproduction.’
    • ‘Vocally they are distinct from other parrots although any Amazon in a mixed collection may mimic other sounds.’
    • ‘More than other parrot species, Amazons are well known for their strong or often moody characters.’

Origin

Late Middle English: via Latin from Greek Amazōn, explained by the Greeks as without a breast (as if from a- without + mazos breast), referring to the fable that the Amazons cut off the right breast so as not to interfere with the use of a bow, but probably a folk etymology of an unknown foreign word.

Pronunciation:

Amazon

/ˈaməz(ə)n/