Definition of aileron in English:

aileron

noun

  • A hinged surface in the trailing edge of an aeroplane wing, used to control the roll of an aircraft about its longitudinal axis.

    • ‘Probably due to flutter, an aileron departed the wing and the racer flipped over out of control and smashed into the ground.’
    • ‘Put the palm of your hand against the bottom of the leading edge of the aileron at each hinge and push up.’
    • ‘In order to prevent student pilots from getting into deeps stalls followed by deadly spins, Thieblot created a wing that allowed the ailerons to remain effective in a stall, thus making stall recovery easier.’
    • ‘Avoid adverse yaw by allowing the ailerons to streamline when there's no crosswind present.’
    • ‘With a sliding hatch, nonsteerable nosewheel and the quickest ailerons of any four-seater, the Cheetah was one of the sportiest singles you could buy in the late '70s.’
    • ‘Airplanes turn while remaining aloft primarily by controlling the positions of ailerons mounted on horizontally oriented wings.’
    • ‘He entered the fuselage from a hatch located between the flaps / ailerons atop the fuselage.’
    • ‘Once the airplane reaches a high enough altitude, the water freezes, affecting the operation of an aileron control bearing.’
    • ‘The other intuitive reaction is to attempt to roll the aircraft with ailerons to level the wings.’
    • ‘A pilot turns an airplane by using the ailerons and coordinated rudder to roll to a desired bank angle.’
    • ‘The rear two cylinders of the six cylinder engine were visible above the ground, with the rest below ground, Flight control cables were attached to elevator, rudder, and ailerons.’
    • ‘It dawned on me the free-play I felt in the flight controls was an aileron gasping for air to push against as I leveled the wings.’
    • ‘The left wing is now finished as are the flaps and ailerons while the wing tips are nearing completion.’
    • ‘It sat on the trailing edge of the wings, preventing the ailerons from moving.’
    • ‘He designed the world's first aircraft with ailerons.’
    • ‘Eva Air landed in Los Angeles in one piece, with rudder, elevator, fuselage, trim tabs and ailerons intact.’
    • ‘Contrary to what one might think, the short wings and the four ailerons give only a modest rate of roll.’
    • ‘There, stretching from the leading edge to the aileron hinge, was a crack in the plywood skin about an eighth of an inch wide.’
    • ‘From a distance, it was easy to see that while the aileron on one side was in alignment, the other aileron was sagging significantly.’
    • ‘Each wing has a single aileron surface on the trailing edge to control roll and two flaps to control lift and drag.’

Origin

Early 20th century: from French, literally small wing, diminutive of aile, from Latin ala wing.

Pronunciation:

aileron

/ˈeɪlərɒn/