Definition of ahead in English:

ahead

adverb

  • 1Further forward in space; in the line of one's forward motion.

    ‘the road ahead’
    ‘he was striding ahead towards the stream’
    • ‘A passenger in his car, his son, said he had not been paying attention to the road ahead as they travelled towards their home.’
    • ‘Then, just before the interval, Brewster crafted a path for Ian Black on the left but he opted to let fly from long range when the space ahead beckoned him to come a little closer.’
    • ‘They're not moving, just gazing ahead toward the Japanese lines.’
    • ‘Then breaking the surface, one by one, the swimmers form a new line, a line that charges ahead like an angry serpent.’
    • ‘Loud, angry voices carried to him from the narrow space ahead.’
    • ‘For those who can fit into the seats the driving position is excellent, with the floor-mounted pedals being dead ahead and well spaced.’
    • ‘Getting out we can see that there's couple more spaces ahead, then a cattlegrid, another junction and apparently a cottage beyond it.’
    • ‘It was a long the hall with doorways lining the walls up ahead and they seemed to continue endlessly.’
    • ‘Then Mr. Lake moved to stand beside Sara, again motioning ahead.’
    • ‘Vicki stepped off the escalator, waited for him to do the same, and then motioned ahead.’
    • ‘‘Come, we might as well start our journey as we talk,’ he said as he motioned towards the road ahead.’
    • ‘There were problems somewhere up ahead on the line, but the chain kept moving, and Lopez felt pressure to keep up.’
    • ‘As I motioned him ahead he looked at me with disbelief then lunged forward.’
    • ‘And if you do find yourself in traffic, pull over and let the line behind you pass ahead and you'll usually have the road to yourself again.’
    • ‘Nowadays we just shake our heads in misery and shuffle ahead in line, waiting for the next available teller.’
    • ‘The police lining the block ahead yelled to stop, but the two young men in front apparently didn't hear because they were talking.’
    • ‘Once they got through the horribly long line, Ellen ran ahead and found them a table.’
    • ‘Ava, a slumped, grey-haired woman just ahead in the line, is intrigued to hear of similar events going on elsewhere.’
    • ‘Sally, 26, who qualifies as a nurse next month, said she could see a line of traffic ahead and realised something was wrong.’
    • ‘She spoke quietly, and her eyes darted back toward the road ahead.’
    towards the front, frontwards
    in front, at the head, in the lead, at the fore, to the fore, in the vanguard, in the van, in advance, at the head of the queue
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    1. 1.1Further forward in time; in the near future.
      ‘he contemplated the day ahead’
      ‘we have to plan ahead’
      • ‘There may be challenges ahead but the future in this sector is certainly looking brighter than for several years.’
      • ‘Mrs Gilligan, who with her husband and sons runs a thriving dairying farm, believes the new system will give farmers the freedom to plan ahead for the future.’
      • ‘Although the couple feared the worst, it went unspoken and they tried to look to the future and plan ahead.’
      • ‘Tabby is a very talented entertainer and he has bright future ahead on stage.’
      • ‘But there was still a big future ahead for plastics, in packaging, for example.’
      • ‘The framework should help public bodies, airport operators and airlines plan ahead for future applications.’
      • ‘But looking ahead to the future, a scenario that we all fear is one in which the administration effectively ceases to function.’
      • ‘It's that time when we think about the year ahead and start making plans for the future.’
      • ‘Just ahead, crossing the line, the growing use of profanity on television.’
      • ‘It is difficult to plan ahead when the future is so uncertain.’
      • ‘It offers a path ahead, a future where there had been only a past.’
      • ‘What steps have been taken, and what's ahead in the near future?’
      • ‘Rachel told the meeting that there is a huge amount of work to be undertaken in the months ahead.’
      • ‘Right now, Levski's two champion teams are enjoying a well-deserved break after a job well done and looking ahead to future successes.’
      • ‘Sometime ahead in future, these images may become invaluable records.’
      • ‘In fact, I'm seriously impressed at just how many parents, grandparents and other relatives are thinking ahead and planning their family's future.’
      • ‘Keep optimistic about the future and keep looking ahead.’
      • ‘However, the day ahead is dominated by a massive amount of college homework.’
      • ‘Having just finished recording his debut album last week, Mike plans to learn more about music, take sound engineering courses and plan ahead for the future.’
      • ‘With a beautiful, healthy baby girl to raise and plans to marry, the couple had an exciting future ahead.’
      • ‘It looked like it was five years ahead in the future.’
      • ‘They were making their wedding plans, and had a great future ahead.’
  • 2In the lead.

    ‘he was slightly ahead on points’
    • ‘Quitting while he was ahead, Shaw led his last big band in 1950.’
    • ‘The crucial thing was that coming up the last few minutes, we were four points ahead but couldn't defend that lead.’
    • ‘Playing against the wind in the first half, Granlahan still managed to edge ahead and held a four points lead at the interval.’
    • ‘Bootham Cons surged ahead to lead 8-1 but Holgate fought back to 10-10 after 11 ends.’
    • ‘Ireland took a handy 18-8 lead into the break and went further ahead within four minutes of the re-start.’
    • ‘Ecofin's day at the races… And they're coming up the back stretch now and it's Economic Recovery way ahead in the lead.’
    • ‘First Japan inched ahead to a tenuous lead holding it through the first half of the race.’
    • ‘Two minutes later, Sharon Duncan put Armagh a point ahead, a lead for the Orchard County for the first time since the fifth minute of the game.’
    • ‘He potted the last red and a green to go 33-12 ahead, a lead which should have been greater as he had taken seven reds without colours.’
    • ‘Taking Italy by surprise the Greeks snuck ahead to a slight lead.’
    • ‘The Aussies start best and kick ahead to an early lead.’
    • ‘Pak responded with a birdie of her own at the 12th to tie the lead but Sorenstam edged ahead again at 15.’
    • ‘Sunderland might have gone further ahead when leading scorer Stephen Elliott wriggled into the penalty area only to drive his shot into the side netting.’
    • ‘Grange regrouped once more and pulled four points ahead however Palatine pulled back this lead once more thanks mainly to a cracking Moran goal.’
    • ‘Robert Allenby took a five-stroke lead to move further ahead after the third round of the Australian Open at Moonah Links near Melbourne.’
    • ‘On the spinnaker reach to Rayrigg Fiscal Folly pulled ahead, extending its lead in the blustery, fluctuating wind on the leg up to Swan's Nest.’
    • ‘In Game Seven, the Sox took the lead early and stayed ahead, defeating the Yankees 10-3.’
    • ‘Gearoid Nagle then pushed Jades ahead again to lead 44-46 as the game entered the final minute.’
    • ‘The Millwall striker kept his nerve and once again sent keeper James Walker the wrong way to put the Lions ahead - a lead that was rarely threatened.’
    • ‘A contrary view might emphasize that the market makers have invested vast amounts to stay ahead in the race for information.’
    leading, winning, in the lead, to the fore, first, coming first
    View synonyms
  • 3Higher in number, amount, or value than previously.

    ‘profits were slightly ahead’
    • ‘They are worlds ahead in price, quality and overall value.’
    • ‘Pre-tax profits are likely to race ahead to around £84.9m from £36.9m in 2002.’
    • ‘Marine services provider James Fisher and Sons is surging ahead after unveiling an 11 per cent rise in pre-tax profits for the first half of the year.’
    • ‘Trading at its hotels in the US had also improved with profits ahead 20% on the same period last year.’
    • ‘Analysts expect next year's half-year profits to nudge ahead to about £60m from £57m last time.’
    • ‘Profits for calendar 2003 are likely to be puff ahead by around £70m at £2.56 bn.’
    • ‘Operating profits from the region were 12% ahead on the back of greater efficiency and lower costs.’
    • ‘While demand may pick up as the threat of recession recedes, there are doubts that corporate profitability can soar ahead.’
    • ‘Corporate banking was also very strongly ahead with profits rising by 44 per cent.’
    • ‘Markets and share values were moving ahead anyway.’
    • ‘If the balance sheet comes out ahead enough to indicate a decent profit, the comic or in broader terms the company is healthy.’

Origin

Mid 16th century (originally in nautical use): from a- ‘in, at’+ head.

Pronunciation:

ahead

/əˈhɛd/