Definition of agglutinate in English:

agglutinate

verb

  • 1Firmly stick or be stuck together to form a mass.

    ‘rhinoceros horns are agglutinated masses of hair’
    • ‘In many cases they were seen agglutinated and forming smaller or larger black clusters.’
    • ‘At first, the attempts to separate agglutinated plates applying mechanical force were undertaken.’
    • ‘The mutual orientation of agglutinated plates is similar to the putative organization of twin domains in a crystal; therefore it was supposed that agglutinated and twinned crystals have similar nature.’
    • ‘Lump asafoetida, sometimes called mass, is the most common commercial form, consisting of tears agglutinated into a more or less uniform mass or lump.’
    • ‘Pangolins are conspicuous and remarkable because their backs are covered with large, overlapping scales made up of agglutinated hairs.’
    1. 1.1Biology
      (with reference to bacteria or red blood cells) clump together.
      [with object] ‘these strains agglutinate human red cells’
      [no object] ‘cell fragments agglutinate and form intricate meshes’
      • ‘In addition to increasing the viscosity of airway secretions, albumin can agglutinate individual cilia and destroy coordinated ciliary motion, which may lead to impairment of mucociliary clearance.’
      • ‘If the antiserum agglutinates in your red blood cells, you are Rh positive.’
      • ‘The ‘mixed field’ results with anti-A sera showed one large agglutinate with ‘free cells’ in the background.’
      • ‘The direct agglutination test, in which stained parasites are agglutinated by serum antibodies, is popular in Iran and Africa, but variation between batches and the high cost of commercially available antigen are limiting factors.’
      • ‘A cross-match later revealed that her serum agglutinated her husband's cells.’
    2. 1.2Linguistics
      [with object](of a language) combine (word elements) to express compound ideas.
      • ‘French-based Creoles are notable for such fused forms in which the noun is agglutinated to the article, as Haitian Creole dlo ‘water’, which corresponds to the French sequence of words de l' eau.’
      • ‘The problem is that Inuktitut is a language where phrases are joined together in a single word - what we call an agglutinating language - so even circumlocutions like ‘wet sticky snow’ come out as one word.’
      • ‘In most cases, the first 2nd, 3rd or 4th letters of each Basque word were agglutinated into a new word.’
      • ‘The pronouns in Sumerian are gender indifferent just like in Uralic and Altaic and are also affixed to the morpheme and become part of the agglutinated phrase.’
      • ‘Languages can be classified into one of three types: isolating or noninflective, agglutinating, and inflecting.’

Origin

Mid 16th century: from Latin agglutinat- caused to adhere, from the verb agglutinare, from ad- to + glutinare (from gluten glue).

Pronunciation:

agglutinate

/əˈɡluːtɪneɪt/