Main definitions of agape in English

: agape1agape2

agape1

adjective

  • predicative (of a person's mouth) wide open in surprise or wonder.

    ‘Downes listened, mouth agape with incredulity’
    • ‘And they both just stood here with their mouths agape and wondering what had made the bucket spin like that.’
    • ‘Relena and Tamika stared at Lynn, mouths agape.’
    • ‘We followed him into the house, trying not to look too much like tourists with our mouths agape.’
    • ‘Some just stood there, their mouths agape, stunned by what the old woman had just said.’
    • ‘At his slightly overwhelmed expression and agape jaw, she snorted bitterly.’
    • ‘Even old Washington hands sometimes find themselves with their mouths agape at the brazenness of the latest corporate innovation in ripping off the public.’
    • ‘It may be brilliant political jujitsu - conceding the opposition's most damning point leaves them with mouths agape and little to say - or it may be nuts.’
    • ‘Her older sisters stand with their mouths agape.’
    • ‘Nero's mouth is slightly agape and odd, gurgling noises come from within.’
    • ‘When fishermen are throwing away unused bait, the pelicans will descend in noisy throngs and are very adept at catching fish morsels in mid air, mouths agape as they squawk for more!’
    • ‘Then the herd picked up and moved on, leaving us bundled up against the cold, our mouths agape, wondering if what we witnessed was real or some sort of illusion in the arctic fog.’
    • ‘Three years ago when this Japanese company made its first Montreal appearance, they bowled everyone over and left them with mouths agape, wanting more.’
    • ‘In a sudden burst she sat down and gazed at the teacher whose mouth was now agape with shock.’
    • ‘The onlookers are painted in muddy greens and browns, facial features exaggerated into primitive masks, mouths agape or obliterated altogether.’
    • ‘The cast members in the wings looked on with mouths agape, but the two on the stage didn't notice, caught up in the sadness and regret an impossible love could provoke.’
    • ‘With my mouth agape I shook her hand, dumbfounded.’
    • ‘They stared at each other, mouths agape and speechless.’
    • ‘The audience sat in a stunned silence, their mouths agape at Cohen's audacity.’
    • ‘The startled crew around us, unaccustomed to hearing a sociopolitical argument in the disco at 1 A.M., looked on with mouths agape.’
    • ‘So you've got to get an enormous charge out of watching the audience with their mouths agape.’
    amazed, filled with astonishment, filled with amazement, astounded, staggered, surprised, startled, stunned, thunderstruck, aghast, taken aback, confounded, dumbfounded, stupefied, dazed, nonplussed, dumbstruck, open-mouthed, lost for words, wide-eyed, awed, filled with awe, filled with wonder, awestruck, wonderstruck
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 17th century: from a- ‘on’ + gape.

Pronunciation

agape

/əˈɡeɪp/

Main definitions of agape in English

: agape1agape2

agape2

noun

mass noun
  • 1Christian love, as distinct from erotic love or simple affection.

    • ‘Christ is agape; self - giving, nonresistant love.’
    • ‘Delectio is the Latin word for agape in the Bible, it is a love which honours the other person; it is the love which we are enjoined to love the other person.’
    • ‘But agape is love without any thought of reward or benefit.’
    • ‘Thus at least some form of agape is possible independent of Christian faith and hope.’
    • ‘If we work in this way, we offer the possibility that our research will include our own formation of agape, or love for the ‘other.’’
    • ‘Whereas among the Greeks the primary virtues were practical wisdom, self-restraint, justice and courage, for Paul the primary virtue was agape.’
    • ‘Grant's book is a highly nuanced examination of much of the literature on altruism and agape, while also giving some attention to recent considerations of eros and philia.’
    • ‘At the center stands an unapologetic Christian account of agape.’
    • ‘Jesus' new commandment is that his followers practice love, agape.’
    • ‘I know, for example, that in Greek there are three words for love: agape, philia, and eros.’
    • ‘The love of God is non-possessive eros; the love of man pure agape; the love of God is passion; the love of man, compassion.’
    • ‘God gives you agape love - deep, unconditional, fatherly love.’
    • ‘The kind of love I believe they mean is this agape, unconditional love.’
    • ‘Here there are many good examples of agape friendship.’
    • ‘Lewis Ayres says that the distinction between eros and agape does not work for Augustine.’
    • ‘Too many craved spiritual gifts and wanted to use them without having agape as their end or aim.’
    • ‘The ancient Greeks made the distinction between eros and agape.’
    • ‘In other words, such love is still within the province of Eros, whereas, much like Spinoza's third kind of knowledge, agape is intellectual love.’
    • ‘Desire is frightening to Christians who are used to saying that only agape - unconditional, self-emptying love - is truly Christian.’
    • ‘Christians are urged to practice agape: love not as sexual desire, not as a devotion to something transcendent, not as friendship, but as charity.’
    1. 1.1count noun A communal meal held in Christian fellowship.
      • ‘This ritual blessing of bread and wine was usually performed within the context of a meal called the agape.’
      • ‘There were songs sang to emphasise the sad mood, then we journeyed on to my grandfather's house for the agape, which is a funeral luncheon.’
      • ‘It is an agape feast in the sense that God's love is shared, not only among the participants but also with those who eat and drink and those who are hungry in the world.’
      • ‘The agape did not take the place of an ordinary meal as do the modern church suppers at which people eat to satisfy hunger.’
      • ‘What a privilege to break the fast with an agape meal… a love feast!’

Origin

Early 17th century: from Greek agapē ‘brotherly love’.

Pronunciation

agape

/ˈaɡəpi/