Definition of against in English:

against

Pronunciation /əˈɡɛnst//əˈɡeɪnst/

preposition

  • 1In opposition to.

    ‘the fight against crime’
    ‘he decided against immediate publication’
    ‘swimming against the tide’
    • ‘Testing ourselves against opposition of this quality is one reason why we need to bounce back into the top flight.’
    • ‘But he said they were an important weapon in the fight against terrorism and organised crime.’
    • ‘And he also credited the public as having played a major role in the fight against crime.’
    • ‘Many of the relays doing very well up against stiff opposition and bad weather.’
    • ‘Footage from existing cameras is already helping in the fight against crime.’
    • ‘It is vital in the fight against crime that the public is able to trust law enforcement officials.’
    • ‘In opposition, we were against the privatisation of air traffic control, then did the opposite in power.’
    • ‘News that technology is assisting the fight against crime has been welcomed.’
    • ‘He has fought against it in government, in opposition and within his own party.’
    • ‘Just why a public body should set itself up to start a fight against its own public is a mystery to me but they sure have a fight on their hands now!’
    • ‘People don't like to change their ways and all great change has come against opposition.’
    • ‘As has been said so many times before - in the fight against crime there can be no compromise.’
    • ‘It is one of the various small ways in which the public can fight back against the people who are undermining their quality of life.’
    • ‘He said they were up against opposition from some people who were concerned at the damage done to the hillside.’
    • ‘The fight against burglary, anti-social behaviour and serious drug crime are at the top of our list.’
    • ‘In fact we have publicly challenged and argued against those of his ideas we disagree with.’
    • ‘The sooner serious and public action is taken against organised crime, the better.’
    • ‘We also need the respect of the general public in the fight against crime and drugs.’
    • ‘That's a very European idea, which needs to fight against a tough tide of facts for survival.’
    • ‘A town centre has been awarded safer shopping status in recognition of its fight against crime.’
    opposed to, in opposition to, hostile to, averse to, antagonistic towards, inimical to, unsympathetic to, resistant to, at odds with, in disagreement with, contra
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 In opposition to, with reference to legal action.
      ‘the first victim gave evidence against him’
      • ‘Those who ignore the zone can be reported to trading standards officers who might take legal action against them.’
      • ‘A Home Office spokesman said today a decision had not yet been made on whether to appeal against the decision.’
      • ‘Pharmacy representatives have until Saturday May 7 to appeal against the decision.’
      • ‘They held an urgent meeting last week to consider taking legal action against the police.’
      • ‘An officer cannot appeal against a decision for an allegation to be formally investigated.’
      • ‘But the objectors believe that the mobile phone company is to appeal against the decision.’
      • ‘Unlike England, the poor had the right of legal appeal against the denial of relief.’
      • ‘We will not tolerate abuse of staff who are simply trying to do their job and we will take legal action against residents who do this.’
      • ‘Arthur's legal action against the police, believed to be over pension rights, is continuing.’
      • ‘His lawyers have been instructed to begin legal action against the newspaper.’
      • ‘It is understood there have been no threats of legal action against them from the victims' families.’
      • ‘The employee should get a written explanation of this and must be told that he or she has the right to appeal against your decision.’
      • ‘However, that was refused and they did not appeal against the decision.’
      • ‘He has no right to appeal against deportation but under a legal loophole can appeal against the destination.’
      • ‘An appeal against the council's decision was turned down two months later.’
      • ‘But the pub is appealing against the decision and is allowed to continue trading in the meantime.’
      • ‘He is considering legal action against the FBI and has discussed his case with a lawyer friend in Cape Town.’
      • ‘It was not the first time the company had appealed against a decision.’
      • ‘With no thought for their own safety, the women took a decision to give evidence against their tormentors in court.’
      • ‘There is no automatic appeal procedure against the adjudicator's decision.’
    2. 1.2 In opposition to, with reference to a sporting contest.
      ‘the championship match against Somerset’
      • ‘It is to these moments that the team would be looking tonight in this crucial game against Costa Rica.’
      • ‘Their whole season rests on a home contest against Bolton on Saturday April 17.’
      • ‘I think after the England game we had gone into the match against Italy with a little trepidation.’
      • ‘The team were very nervous in their opening matches against Israel and Portugal.’
      • ‘Their final contest will be against the loser of the final of each respective other table.’
      • ‘But now all he wants to do is get home before the Whites big match against Manchester City this weekend.’
      • ‘The remaining 17 games include matches against all the other sides in the bottom eight.’
      • ‘I am optimistic that we have the tools to mount a reasonable contest against the midfield teams this year.’
      • ‘It was the Czechs' seventh win in nine world championship games against its neighbor.’
      • ‘We may have lost the match against Brazil but the game has helped to save the life of a local man.’
      • ‘There is no doubt that the match against Italy in a fortnight's time is a huge game for us.’
      • ‘His mother recalls watching that thrilling doubles match against the Israeli champions.’
      • ‘Five weeks of club games and disrupted training sessions prefaced their match against Limerick.’
      • ‘The match against Coleraine this Saturday gives him the perfect opportunity to do this.’
      • ‘Obviously injuries may be picked up in their Boxing Day game against Portsmouth, so keep one eye on that match.’
      • ‘United started well against Portsmouth and the game was over after 16 minutes.’
      • ‘In the last game against Brisbane he lacked match fitness and failed to make a contribution.’
      • ‘The team won five matches and only dropped one game for the round against Navy in the lead up to the finals.’
      • ‘What I am concentrating on now is the first match against the world champions Germany.’
      • ‘Saturday's game against Altrincham was a tense affair with everyone knowing a win could clinch us the title.’
  • 2In anticipation of and preparation for (a problem or difficulty)

    ‘he gritted his teeth against the pain’
    ‘makeshift barricades against tank attacks’
    • ‘They thus gave permission for them to take out insurance against damage suffered.’
    • ‘By the way, a large number of cyclists carry insurance against third party claims.’
    • ‘It is, for the time being, a great insurance against any terrorist attack.’
    • ‘Gritting his teeth against the agony, he slowly turned his head to look at Danny.’
    • ‘In which case, would it not be prudent to take out some insurance against the event?’
    • ‘She clenched her teeth against the pain that flooded through her and tried to calm down.’
    • ‘Daniel gritted his teeth against the overwhelming sensations that were taking hold of him.’
    • ‘Claire gritted her teeth against the pain, a high, keen sound escaping her lips.’
    • ‘It was my insurance against fate, and I had to make sure that nobody would take it away.’
    • ‘He closed his eyes and let his power surge through him, gritting his teeth against the torrent.’
    • ‘Brushing at night is important as it protects teeth against acid attack while you are asleep.’
    • ‘It covers your repayments against accident, sickness, involuntary unemployment.’
    • ‘Artists may join a union from which they receive insurance against unemployment.’
    • ‘Groaning and biting her teeth against the pain she pushed herself to her knees.’
    • ‘The film shows how she and her mother battled against her learning difficulties.’
    • ‘How could the government especially appear so defenseless against a direct attack?’
    • ‘He says his action has stalled because he will not go to court without insurance against the possibility of losing.’
    • ‘During the Second World War the defences were rescarped against tank attack.’
    • ‘Uranium was used to shield tanks against attack by conventional armour-piercing weapons.’
    in case of, as provision for, in provision for, in preparation for, in anticipation of, in expectation of
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 In resistance to; as protection from.
      ‘he turned up his collar against the wind’
      • ‘Without protection of the sails against a merciless sun, it became unbearable on deck.’
      • ‘How does she pick a male whose genetic complement confers protection against disease?’
      • ‘Protection against winter cold will give some plants in the garden a better chance of making it through to the spring.’
      • ‘I've repotted my ornamental grass into a deeper pot, to give it better protection against drying out.’
      • ‘Well saved turf was the only protection the family had against cold and disease in winter.’
      • ‘The roof of the cabin has been engineered to provide protection against head injuries in the event of a collision.’
      • ‘The best protection against loss, damage or injury due to wildfire is prevention.’
      • ‘The only other protection against the elements was a 2ft high wall at the back of the shelter.’
      • ‘Some people have a strong resistance against the flu virus, while it caused others to die.’
      • ‘Again the opportunity to identify the importance of protection against cold for survivors at sea was missed.’
      • ‘It says the crop residue holds soil in place and protects it against wind and rain.’
      • ‘Currently, parents wanting protection against polio are offered oral vaccinations.’
      • ‘The skin is constantly hydrated and has protection against line-producing dehydration.’
      • ‘As to the protection against lightning, there is not much difference between the two.’
      • ‘Not only will they be unable to use parasols for protection against the sun, they will not be allowed to take in food or drink.’
      • ‘Vines are trained on low bushes as protection against the strong winds.’
      • ‘The early poncho was worn by men of all classes as a garment for protection against the rain and cold.’
      • ‘He had a brown suede jacket with light brown denim pants, his collar was turned up against the wind.’
      • ‘Rounded towers and thick bulwarks provided maximum protection against the siege engines of that era.’
      • ‘A curtain has been fixed at the eastern end of the shelter as a protection against the driving wind and rain.’
      to protect oneself from, in resistance to
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2 In relation to (an amount of money owed, due, or lent) so as to reduce, cancel, or secure it.
      ‘money was advanced against the value of the property’
      • ‘Arrange an expensive short-term loan secured against these properties until they are sold.’
      • ‘Investors who plough money in these schemes can offset rental income against tax.’
      • ‘That way co-buyers can choose to top up items which are almost ready to be bought, or start a new item with no money against it.’
      • ‘Furthermore, many clubs have borrowed money against future season ticket sales.’
      • ‘Mortgage interest will be allowable against rental income and VAT is recoverable.’
      • ‘Those loans will often be secured against the value of the property on which the advances are being made.’
      • ‘It has also been reported that some institutions may even lend against a work of art to buy more art!’
      • ‘This has resulted in massive volume growth in lending against rising asset values.’
      • ‘Invoice financing is similar to factoring, where banks lend against sales and money owed by debtors.’
      • ‘He must carry forward the unused part of his limit for set off against his income in the following year.’
      • ‘Landlords can offset the interest they pay on their mortgage against rental income to reduce the amount of tax they pay.’
      • ‘Your home may be at risk if you do not keep up payments on a mortgage or any other loan secured against it.’
      • ‘The family wanted to use the farmhouse against borrowing money to buy further farm land.’
      • ‘Housing associations would be able to secure bank loans against the properties to carry out repairs.’
      • ‘I have recently taken out a loan secured against my property, so am I going to regret it?’
      • ‘The one major advantage property does have is that it's much easier to borrow money against it.’
      • ‘In the Eighties, tax breaks were offered against money invested in tree plantations.’
      • ‘Negative equity occurs when the loan secured against a property is greater than the value of the property itself.’
      • ‘Think long and hard about borrowing money against the roof over your head.’
      • ‘In a recent article, we wrote about the dangers of borrowing money against your home.’
    3. 2.3 (in betting) in anticipation of the failure of.
      ‘the odds were 5–1 against England’
      • ‘The former champion will be the runaway favourite for Le Tour again this year - and few would bet against him.’
      • ‘He has already won 21 races and few would bet against that number increasing in the season to come.’
      • ‘If they continue in this vein it will be a brave man who bets against them winning a fourth successive title.’
      • ‘United will be very strong favourites to win this cup and a strong man would bet against them.’
      • ‘And who's betting against the team adding a new chapter to the story this weekend?’
      • ‘Betting exchanges allow people to bet against each other person-to-person over the internet.’
      • ‘From August the odds each month against winning the jackpot are 13 billion to one for each bond.’
      • ‘He did, truth to be told, bet against Liverpool but it was a wager we were happy to lose.’
      • ‘I think there were people who bet against him yesterday who were cheering him past the post.’
      • ‘While there will be even more chances to bet, the odds are against even more punters winning.’
      • ‘If the player does not wish to bet against the second card, a third card can be called for at the same price.’
      • ‘Given the performance of semiconductor stocks in the past year, who wants to bet against him?’
      • ‘This is not really a poker game, in that players do not bet against each other.’
      • ‘Who would bet against Penrith not overtaking Aspatria next season as Cumbria's Number Two club?’
      • ‘If they do win, it really will be a magnificent team performance but I would not bet against Wigan in this.’
      • ‘Byrd is favored but people have gone to the poor house betting against Evander Holyfield.’
      • ‘This is because gold is not only seen as a hedge against the dollar, but as a financial bet against inflation too.’
      • ‘The crowd gasped again, and there was a happy cry from the one man who had bet against me.’
      • ‘Would anyone bet against Real Madrid reaching the latter stages if they were pitched into the World Cup?’
      • ‘Who would bet against him adding Olympic gold to his Tour de France crown.’
  • 3In or into physical contact with (something), so as to be supported by or collide with it.

    ‘she stood with her back against the door’
    ‘frustration made him bang his head against the wall’
    • ‘It is helpful here to perform the postures against a support such as a wall.’
    • ‘This is done by cutting off all fruited canes at the base and untangling new growth and tying it to supports against the wall or fence.’
    • ‘She put out a hand against the wall for support, and took several soothing breaths.’
    • ‘I can relate to that desire to light a wood fire and sleep against the ground and watch the stars and the coming light.’
    • ‘The delegation heard that one inmate had complained that his head was repeatedly banged against a wall by an officer.’
    • ‘Rocky almost knocked him out when he burst in the house, slamming the door against he wall.’
    • ‘She slowly crawled over to the right of the door, leaned up against the wall, and brought her knees to her chest.’
    • ‘In other incidents I have received bruises, a sprained thumb and had my head banged against a wall.’
    • ‘She was grabbed by the hair, pushed against the wall and had her head banged several times by the accused.’
    • ‘The door was slammed hard against the wall, sending it rocking on its hinges.’
    • ‘To help keep the plant in check, it is best grown in a container and the stems trained against a support.’
    • ‘He said the man grabbed hold of him and banged his back against a low garden wall four or five times.’
    • ‘There was another thump, and then something banged up against the door to her lab.’
    • ‘It banged against the wall with a resounding thud that echoed through the ship.’
    • ‘He held my head in his lap so I couldn't bang it against the wall, and he wrapped his arms around me and held me.’
    • ‘The man finally stops his kicking and he grabs me by my hair and slams me against the wall.’
    • ‘After one last, warning crush, he let go, my frame slumping against the wall for support.’
    • ‘The police Sergeant said a man grabbed her by the hair and pinned her against the wall.’
    • ‘Neighbours then heard an argument, the sounds of somebody being pushed against a wall and banging doors.’
    • ‘She banged her head lightly against the wall and heard the ringing noise of metal.’
    touching, in contact with, close up to, up against, abutting, on, adjacent to
    View synonyms
  • 4In conceptual contrast to.

    ‘the benefits must be weighed against the costs’
    • ‘Vaccinations are expensive and costs must be weighed up against the risks involved.’
    • ‘Once again the advantages and disadvantages have to be weighed against each other.’
    • ‘If you weigh that against good behaviour for the last year does that warrant releasing him into the public?’
    • ‘The harm of ending an incipient life must be weighed against the consequences for society.’
    • ‘These considerations must be weighed against the harm to the man as a result of testing.’
    • ‘The doctor said the benefits of any radiotherapy had to be weighed against the risks of the treatment.’
    • ‘But this long-term view has to be weighed against all the work that needs to be undertaken now.’
    • ‘The need to be met is not weighed against other needs in such a way as to order a phasing of the process.’
    • ‘The benefits of this approach must be weighed against the morbidity of the procedure.’
    • ‘The benefits of overthrow must of course be weighed against the horrific costs of war.’
    • ‘The risks of taking medicine have to be weighed against the risks of depression.’
    • ‘However, this must also be weighed up against the standard of medical care available.’
    • ‘This has to be weighed against the cost of redeeming early and the fees that often accompany taking out a new deal.’
    • ‘The various institutions which affect opportunity must be weighed against each other.’
    • ‘Weighing against this are the potential inflation effects of the weak dollar.’
    • ‘Having to make decisions can be stressful, because you have to weigh one option against another.’
    • ‘But the huge provision of liquidity by the Federal Reserve could weigh against the dollar.’
    • ‘Businesses say the advantages of trading with Europe have to be weighed against the increased cost of red tape.’
    against, in opposition to, contrary to, at variance with, in defiance of, in contravention of, contrarily, contrariwise, conversely
    View synonyms
    1. 4.1 In visual contrast to.
      ‘he was silhouetted against the light of the stair window’
      • ‘Gaze up at the horizon and see the silhouette of the fort against the night sky.’
      • ‘Its benign silhouette squats against the southern sky like some fat Buddha.’
      • ‘Others climbed high, silhouetted against the sky, before returning to the marsh.’
      • ‘We walked out of the station and I looked up at the city walls, silhouetted against the darkening evening sky.’
      • ‘The stern grey walls of the city were silhouetted against the flaming sky as the sun set.’
      • ‘I set up behind a thick screen of rushes, staying low so that I wasn't silhouetted against the sky.’
      • ‘The little one stands at the entrance to the cave, her form black against the light of the full moon.’
      • ‘The first thing we see on stage is the old lady in her rocking chair silhouetted against a window.’
      • ‘Its silhouette against the sky is unique, the sound of its engine unmistakable.’
      • ‘Mai appeared at the door, silhouetted against the brighter light from the other room.’
      • ‘Silhouetted against the afterglow, these fiercest of hawks formed an impressive picture.’
      • ‘Eight mounted figures appeared on the other ridge, silhouetted against the sky.’
      • ‘They were monolithic silhouettes against the summer night, sharing the fate of all buildings.’
      • ‘Behind us, a small silhouette against a light grey sky was the castle.’
      • ‘They said one firework looked like a traffic light but he could see none of the colours against the night sky.’
      • ‘All but one of the boilers remained in position, silhouetted against the green water and ambient light.’
      • ‘With the cirrus they created a faint lattice of white against light blue.’
      • ‘It was silhouetted against the flames and it looked like a huge rocket.’
      • ‘It was not quite dark and the lights looked really cool against the dark blue.’
      • ‘Black clouds obscure flashes of orange light against the night sky in the city.’
      in contrast to, as a foil to
      View synonyms

Phrases

  • against one's wishes

    • When one is unwilling or has refused.

      ‘if any photos or information are included here against your wishes, please let me know and they will be removed immediately’
      • ‘We would not accept the Vatican (or anyone else) reburying our dearest against their wishes.’
      • ‘Mrs Wilson said her brother will now be cremated, against her wishes.’
      • ‘Women do not necessarily grow to love the man they marry against their wishes.’
      • ‘Jacqui Smith had clashed with Mr Johnson over the departure of Sir Ian, who was ousted against her wishes.’
      • ‘Her father, a noble magistrate in Grenoble, sent her, against her wishes, to become a nun.’
      • ‘She henceforth found herself in the vehicle against her wishes.’
      • ‘Gladstone a suffragette prisoner was fed, against her wishes, whilst on hunger strike.’
      • ‘Strangely enough, I had to leave my close comrades-in-arms behind or send them, against their wishes, to distant places.’
      • ‘I am not aware of anyone being made redundant against their wishes.’
      • ‘He was removed from Broadmoor high security psychiatric hospital against his wishes.’
  • against the law (or rules)

    • Illegal or unlawful.

      ‘cockfighting has been against the law in South Carolina for 120 years’
      ‘it was against the rules to leave the dormitory after midnight’
      • ‘It's against the law for these children to be locked up.’
      • ‘It may be against the common practice, not against the law.’
      • ‘The question now is whether it was against the law.’
      • ‘Craig's arrest was second-rate entrapment for something that shouldn't be against the law in the first place.’
      • ‘Unauthorised racing on the road is already against the law.’
      • ‘According to Help the Aged research, more than 80 % of us think age discrimination is already against the law.’
      • ‘Using cruise control in Belgium is against the law.’
      • ‘However, ethics aside, to force an employee to pay for a mistake, even one due to carelessness is against the law.’
      • ‘To have a picture of the Dalai Lama is against the law.’
      • ‘High Court judge Mr Justice Burton ruled in April this year that IR35 was not against the law.’
  • have something against someone

    • Dislike or bear a grudge towards someone.

      ‘I have nothing against you personally’
      • ‘I just wanted to tell her that I didn't have any grudges against her!’
      • ‘I think it must be someone who wants us out of the area or has a grudge against us but we're not moving anywhere.’
      • ‘She said: ‘I don't know anyone who would have a grudge against me and want to do this.’’
      • ‘I can't think of anyone at all that has a grudge against us and I have no idea if it's the same person or different people each time.’
      • ‘He told police in interviews that his victim could have been anybody and he had no grudge against the man.’
      • ‘She was anxious that I should not have a grudge against the country, but I was already feeling quite at home.’
      • ‘‘Somebody obviously has a grudge against us,’ she said.’
      • ‘It was just malicious damage, so it looks like somebody has a grudge against him.’
      • ‘But, just for the record, I really don't have any grudge against you, so don't take it personally.’
      • ‘The chief engineer said: We don't know if the culprit has a grudge against us or whether it is simply vandalism.’

Origin

Middle English: from again + -s (adverbial genitive) + -t probably by association with superlatives (as in amongst).

Pronunciation

against

/əˈɡɛnst//əˈɡeɪnst/