Definition of affront in English:

affront

noun

  • An action or remark that causes outrage or offence:

    ‘he took his son's desertion as a personal affront’
    ‘the sackings were an affront to justice’
    • ‘His no-show for any reason other than a personal trauma is a disgrace and an affront to local democracy.’
    • ‘All, however, recognized that it was an affront to academic freedom and a violation of faculty autonomy.’
    • ‘It is an affront to anyone with any sense of human dignity and common decency, regardless of where they stand on the issue.’
    • ‘We weren't the least bit insulted at such an affront to our then easy going, leisurely ways.’
    • ‘To say so would be an affront to the overwhelming majority of conscientious people of both communities.’
    • ‘I don't consider an insensitive person who won't pick up after their dog an affront to my personal beliefs.’
    • ‘A political programme that erodes human dignity is an affront to all of us, and deserves condemnation from every pulpit in the land.’
    • ‘The Foreign Affairs spokesman said this attempt to bypass the people would be an affront to democracy.’
    • ‘At the time she said the ad was not intended to cause offence and described the ban as ‘absurd and an affront to the British sense of humour’.’
    • ‘It is an affront to normal, decent, peace-abiding people of the civilised world.’
    • ‘His ideas are obviously foolish, easily disproved, an affront to any reasoning person.’
    • ‘Excluding an individual on the basis of marital status or sexual orientation is an affront to that person's dignity.’
    • ‘‘Homelessness in all its forms is an affront to social justice,’ he said.’
    • ‘That the power to deny anything from occupying city land rests in the hands of city hall is an affront to the real owners of that land - the people who live in the city.’
    • ‘The fence itself took less than three minutes to come down as people attacked what was widely perceived to be an affront to freedom of assembly and speech.’
    • ‘This is not simply an affront to the detainees, but to all of us.’
    • ‘Limits upon personal freedom and choice are an affront to all that is sacred.’
    • ‘Articles of this sort are an affront to those who died.’
    • ‘The conduct that has come to light is an affront to the most basic standards of morality and decency.’
    • ‘It was an affront to the English language and an offence against all educated people.’
    insult, offence, indignity, slight, snub, slur, aspersion, provocation, injury, put down, humiliation
    outrage, atrocity, scandal, injustice, abuse, desecration, violation
    slap in the face, kick in the teeth
    View synonyms

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Offend the modesty or values of:

    ‘she was affronted by his familiarity’
    • ‘It wasn't bad quality football that I feared, but the vocal opinions of those affronted by coverage of women playing a ‘man's’ game.’
    • ‘They are extremely affronted if their presence is in any way demeaned or overlooked.’
    • ‘She was affronted by this terrible slight on her husband's generosity.’
    • ‘‘It's actually a caramel mocha, to be precise,’ she corrected, looking rather affronted by my attitude.’
    • ‘Her expression was slightly affronted, slightly embarrassed as she opened her mouth to refute his suggestion.’
    • ‘Philip was not affronted; he was too amazed to notice a mere lack of courtesy.’
    • ‘He said he was affronted at suggestions he could have been responsible for the leak.’
    • ‘‘You were affronted when you were hit and decided to exact revenge,’ the Judge told him.’
    • ‘Martin looked at me, pretending to be highly affronted, but the other cashier chose this moment to intervene.’
    • ‘Joel looked slightly affronted by that question but smiled.’
    • ‘They would be affronted if they were accused of not having ‘the vaguest contact’ with modernity.’
    • ‘Nevertheless, she appears affronted by the criticism.’
    • ‘He was genuinely affronted and mystified I'd not done this.’
    • ‘Many are even infuriated and feel affronted by these results.’
    • ‘That way, those who did not wish to be affronted by this would know to stay away.’
    • ‘I was slightly affronted that he seemed to know more about it than I did.’
    • ‘Some were affronted that he brought into daylight memories best elided.’
    • ‘Jack spun round, affronted by this assault on his dignity.’
    • ‘The Ambassador was slightly affronted, but nevertheless he made some transmissions.’
    • ‘She thought maybe the shocked silence that followed affronted Lily more than any response would have.’
    insult, offend, outrage, mortify, provoke, slight, hurt, pique, wound, put out, irk, displease, distress, bother, rankle, needle, vex, gall, scandalize, disgust, disgruntle, put someone's back up, ruffle someone's feathers, make someone's hackles rise, raise someone's hackles
    View synonyms

Origin

Middle English (as a verb): from Old French afronter to slap in the face, insult, based on Latin ad frontem to the face.

Pronunciation:

affront

/əˈfrʌnt/