Definition of affection in English:

affection

noun

mass noun
  • 1A gentle feeling of fondness or liking.

    ‘she felt affection for the wise old lady’
    count noun ‘he won a place in her affections’
    • ‘‘He was a real gentleman and a lot of people had great affection for him,’ she said.’
    • ‘He felt almost intoxicated with admiration and affection for this man.’
    • ‘Family members played some traditional airs at the Mass in appreciation of Maureen's great love and affection for the music.’
    • ‘He was devoted to his family and his concern, care and affection for them was of the highest calibre.’
    • ‘Such performers have an intimacy with and affection for the people they imitate that a mere jester doesn't.’
    • ‘When I go out and about people have incredible affection for me and I think well, that's not bad.’
    • ‘Like all the veterans who fought in Holland, he has tremendous affection for the Dutch people.’
    • ‘The people who work with her feel I think a lot of respect and affection for her, and she unleashes people's energies.’
    • ‘And Canadians have always had this sort of affection for us and we've always had this affection for the Canadian people.’
    • ‘The director… suddenly begins to show affection for the people on the stage.’
    • ‘It's my party after all and I have both loyalty and affection for those who carry our banner forward.’
    • ‘And I think about that so often, because of the universality of people's love and affection for their dads.’
    • ‘There is still embedded in Irish culture a deep respect and genuine affection for the Pope and the office of the Papacy.’
    • ‘Douglas showed respect and affection for the people he portrayed.’
    • ‘This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest us.’
    • ‘I have a real personal admiration and affection for him, and I hope and believe he does for me as well.’
    • ‘His love for children and affection for the sick have endeared him to all.’
    • ‘And I know I'll never ever lose affection for the people and place that once played such an important role in my life.’
    • ‘I have a great affinity and affection for my American counterparts.’
    • ‘But, out of respect and affection for Dave, I'll add it to the growing list of banned words.’
    fondness, love, liking, endearment, feeling, sentiment, tenderness, warmth, warmness, devotion, care
    View synonyms
  • 2archaic The action or process of affecting or being affected.

    1. 2.1count noun A condition or disease.
      ‘an affection of the skin’
      • ‘Cyanosis with shortness of breath is more frequent in pulmonary than cardiac affections.’
      • ‘The manipulations that are now taught under the name of ‘massage’ are useless for the treatment of local affections.’
      • ‘He suffered from an affection of the bladder, and was at length compelled to resort to a surgical operation for relief.’
      • ‘I suffered from an affection of the sight, which forbade all use of the eyes for purposes of study.’
      • ‘Elder flowers are a popular herbal treatment for all bronchial and pulmonary affections.’
    2. 2.2count noun A mental state; an emotion.
      • ‘When the minister in Hawthorne's story donned the veil, ‘its gloom… enabled him to sympathise with all dark affections.’’
      • ‘Passions, or affections that include fear, hate, love, hope and so on, are not spiritual but bodily.’
      • ‘He remarks that the passions are also called affections or perturbations of the mind, as well as motions and affects.’
      • ‘This volume argued that true religion resides in the heart, or the seat of affections, emotions, and inclinations.’
      emotions, feelings, sentiments, soul, mind, bosom, breast
      View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: via Old French from Latin affectio(n-), from afficere ‘to influence’ (see affect).

Pronunciation

affection

/əˈfɛkʃ(ə)n/