noun

British
informal
  • An advertisement.

    • ‘It seems, however, that it is not just the adverts that prey on young minds.’
    • ‘If the news reports failed to tell you it was Christmas, the adverts were quick to plug that gap.’
    • ‘One of the banned adverts in the series appeared as a poster and showed a photograph of an alleyway at night.’
    • ‘Trying to spot what on earth adverts are selling helps fill the gaps between television programmes.’
    • ‘The New Year is usually a very poor time for quality adverts on television.’
    • ‘They have taken out expensive adverts in the trade press, complete with favourable reviews.’
    • ‘They will be accompanied by adverts from local retail companies as well as music promotions.’
    • ‘Have you ever noticed how the adverts at London tube stations vary depending on where you are?’
    • ‘If viewers could rate adverts they like, perhaps the insulting ones would quickly get weeded out.’
    • ‘Amid all the gloom and doom in the advertising industry giant adverts seem to be bucking the trend.’
    • ‘Cash raised will be used to plant and maintain the area where the advert is displayed.’
    • ‘However, our first adverts of the season hit the shelves next week, and then our traffic will rocket.’
    • ‘I was looking for the advertising costs so I can put in an advert for my new venture!’
    • ‘People might take more notice of car insurance adverts that they have time to read.’
    • ‘It's not just about bus shelter adverts and nice shelves in the supermarket.’
    • ‘Poster adverts that talk to people walking by could soon be hitting the high street.’
    • ‘Within days, Kerry's camp responded in kind, buying a series of adverts in key swing states.’
    • ‘The leaflets back a cinema advert being aired locally with the same message.’
    • ‘Advertisers place their adverts where they think they can reach their audience.’
    • ‘The cinema was half full and the adverts went on for over half an hour… ridiculous.’
    notice, announcement, bulletin
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 19th century: abbreviation.

Pronunciation

advert

/ˈadvəːt/

verb

[NO OBJECT]advert to
formal
  • Refer to in speaking or writing.

    ‘I have already adverted to the solar revolution’
    • ‘The delinquencies of the peace process must not be adverted to in public.’
    • ‘It is a matter which your Honours have already seen was adverted to by his Honour in the second sentence.’
    • ‘That is what the parties agreed to, albeit because they did not advert to that consequence.’
    • ‘His report is not helpful and given the shortcomings already adverted to, I prefer to rely on the evidence.’
    • ‘Now, your Honours, in relation to the fourth of those propositions - the first one I have adverted to already.’
    • ‘There is no need to prove that D adverted to the consequences at all.’
    • ‘The gloss I just referred to is adverted to in paragraph 34 of our written submissions.’
    • ‘It adverted to the widespread recognition that the region would be a separate national state.’
    • ‘Now, that is a matter which was adverted to in this Court in a case referred to on page 72 of the application book.’
    • ‘In the long run, can the US adequately respond without adverting to its religious motive?’
    • ‘Yet isn't this what is implied in the allusion which does not advert to the activities of the army?’
    mention, make mention of, make reference to, allude to, touch on, speak about, speak of, talk about, talk of, write about, cite, name, comment on, deal with, go into, treat, treat of, note, point out, call attention to, bring up, raise, broach, introduce
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French avertire, from Latin advertere ‘turn towards’ (see adverse). The original sense was ‘turn one's attention to’, later ‘bring to someone's attention’.

Pronunciation

advert

/ədˈvəːt/