Definition of adumbration in English:

adumbration

noun

  • See adumbrate

    • ‘We have remarked on Hahn's adumbrations of this movement in an earlier one, but one senses a disconnect between the end of the ‘Gigue’ and the beginning of the ‘Ciaccona.’’
    • ‘John watched the way she moved and the way the fire light played against her warm colored skin, highlighting through the refined weave in the gown she wore and the adumbration beneath the veil.’
    • ‘The predominance of death in the novel is a prophetic adumbration of the real death which will bring the characters to God's love, and Eleanor is granted a vision of this when she meets Leopolda the Catholic nun on the night of the storm.’
    • ‘Because of the Fourth Symphony, writers tend to view the Prélude and Fugue as an adumbration, rather than as something aesthetically complete in its own right.’
    • ‘The legitimacy is not in question, but the adumbration, or foreshadowing, is.’

Pronunciation:

adumbration

/adʌmˈbreɪʃ(ə)n/