Definition of adjunction in English:

adjunction

noun

  • 1Mathematics
    The joining of two sets which without overlapping jointly constitute a larger set, or the relation between two such sets.

    • ‘It is worth stressing in Fry's argument the spontaneous adjunction of beauty and consolation, since that throws a certain light on the Dadaists' refusal of beauty: why should they console the war-makers?’
    • ‘The problem of de Groot concerned compactifications of spaces by means of an adjunction of a set of minimal dimension.’
    • ‘According to this account, a morphologically simplex reflexive (being an X° category) can move into another X° position (such as Infl) by adjunction.’
    • ‘Now we have the notion of an adjunction, along with its unit and counit.’
    • ‘The last piece of this puzzle is the notion of an adjunction.’
    • ‘The adjunction of the negation of such a sentence to the axioms of the system yields a consistent extension of formalized classical mathematics in which an actually false proposition [ein inhaltlich falscher Satz] is derivable.’
  • 2Logic
    The asserting in a single formula of two previously asserted formulae.

Origin

Late 16th century: from Latin adjunctio(n)-, from the verb adjungere (see adjoin).

Pronunciation:

adjunction

/əˈdʒʌŋkʃ(ə)n/