Definition of adapt in English:

adapt

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Make (something) suitable for a new use or purpose; modify:

    ‘hospitals have had to be adapted for modern medical practice’
    [with object and infinitive] ‘the policies can be adapted to suit individual needs’
    • ‘Many of them flourish in a broad range of habitats, and nearly all of them are adapted for wide dispersal.’
    • ‘After several years of tests, they are now modifying and adapting the system to their individual enterprises.’
    • ‘In the current investigation, a number of existing measures were adapted for use.’
    • ‘Before the internal combustion engine was adapted for use in fishing boats, human strength was the only means of conquering the seas.’
    • ‘The first pair were adapted for feeding, the next four were walking legs, and the most posterior pair formed large swimming paddles.’
    • ‘An existing in-house induction programme was adapted for the company's overseas staff.’
    • ‘The minibuses are specially adapted for wheelchair users and the timescale to obtain a replacement is four to six months.’
    • ‘In modern Africa large oil drums are often adapted for the purpose.’
    • ‘We use a unique approach to training, adapting our delivery to suit individual groups.’
    • ‘I also reserve the right to modify and adapt elements of the winning design both now and in the future.’
    • ‘The ability to adapt organisational culture to suit individual needs takes many shapes and forms.’
    • ‘Computer manufacturers routinely gave machines to schools at a discount or without cost, but adapting them to educational purposes proved difficult.’
    • ‘We will make these available in a format that you can download, so you can modify or adapt them as needed.’
    • ‘Individual countries can no longer adapt monetary policy to suit their particular economic situation.’
    • ‘Birds use them for flight, and they are exquisitely adapted for flight in their subtlest details.’
    • ‘Indeed, the procedures and trappings of the hunt were adapted for military purposes.’
    • ‘But, for a historian, he seems incredibly obtuse about the process of historical change, particularly the way each culture adapts ideas to suit its own purposes.’
    • ‘The long claws, strong leg and shoulder muscles of these bears are well adapted for digging dens and food.’
    • ‘She then adapts the design to suit the individual.’
    • ‘The building's original gymnasium space and kitchens were adapted for Church use.’
    modify, alter, make alterations to, change, adjust, make adjustments to, convert, transform, redesign, restyle, refashion, remodel, reshape, revamp, rework, redo, reconstruct, reorganize
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    1. 1.1[no object] Become adjusted to new conditions:
      ‘a large organization can be slow to adapt to change’
      • ‘That's why I had to adjust my game and adapt to the team I was with, so with that I just became a shooter.’
      • ‘There is a good deal in this case and other writings about the need for the law to adapt to modern social conditions.’
      • ‘If one is to enjoy any return on the investment, one must be smart, work diligently and adapt to local conditions.’
      • ‘Unless batsmen have a plan worked out in their minds and adapt to the conditions they're playing in, they will make lots of mistakes.’
      • ‘They adapt to the conditions here, the climate, the training, the food.’
      • ‘TS Moorhouse blamed part of the problem on motorists who failed to adapt to the conditions.’
      • ‘If that's the case, then what they need to learn to do is figure out a way to adapt to this change in market conditions.’
      • ‘Therefore, it is important to understand the mechanisms that plants use to adapt to water-limited conditions.’
      • ‘As the game went on they did adapt to the conditions and raised their game accordingly but to no avail.’
      • ‘Some of these individuals might be at an advantage over their predecessors, because they might be more able to adapt to new conditions.’
      • ‘Even die-hard manufacturing experts believe that British industry needs to adapt to the new conditions.’
      • ‘If this happens, it would be crucial that species could adapt to the new conditions.’
      • ‘These archetypes defy history and adapt to local conditions in order to live on.’
      • ‘Without this the species would be unable to adapt to changing conditions and would eventually perish.’
      • ‘It is willing to adapt to new world conditions, and to absorb new technologies and investments.’
      • ‘A decent game of football was never likely as both teams struggled to adapt to the atrocious conditions.’
      • ‘Being able to adapt to any hill conditions or terrain is what makes good skiers great.’
      • ‘They were able to adapt to whatever the political situations or life conditions demanded.’
      • ‘He should've adapted to us rather than trying to make us adapt to him.’
      • ‘These must be understood so plans can evolve and adapt to different conditions.’
      adjust, acclimatize, accommodate, attune, habituate, acculturate, conform
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    2. 1.2 Alter (a text) to make it suitable for filming, broadcasting, or the stage:
      ‘the film was adapted from a Turgenev short story’
      • ‘It was adapted for theatre by Marcy Kahan, from Nora Ephron's original screenplay.’
      • ‘City of Spades is adapted for radio by Biyi Bandele and Directed by Toby Swift.’
      • ‘Some of the most successful films of all time have been adapted from popular novels.’
      • ‘As with any film that is adapted from a novel, the movie often does not do the book justice.’
      • ‘When I first read the musical, which was adapted from the book by some guys in New York, I was very aware of how big it felt and how American it seemed.’
      • ‘Like Minority Report, it was heavily adapted for the screen, but in a way that's necessary.’
      • ‘However, I remember her chiefly for the stage play The Woman in Black, which was adapted from one of her books.’
      • ‘The Notebook and The Proof, by Agota Kristof, is a trilogy which has been adapted from novel to stage.’
      • ‘The story has been adapted from Hans Christian Andersen's classic original and had songs interwoven for the stage version.’
      • ‘The film, adapted from the novel by Robert Harris, is based in fact.’
      • ‘Lord of the Flies is another in a long line of films adapted from various print material.’
      • ‘One of my favourite films of 2001 was Wu Yen, which is adapted from a folk tale that was also made into a Cantonese opera.’
      • ‘I normally stay away from movies which are adapted from books I've read and enjoyed.’
      • ‘The musical, which wowed the crowds when it visited Bradford last year, is adapted from the 1961 film.’
      • ‘It's also a departure, his first period piece and his first film adapted from pre-existing material.’
      • ‘The show runs until January 25 and is adapted from the much loved classic book by Philippa Pearce.’
      • ‘Though the film was adapted from the stage musical of the same name, all of the songs have been cut.’
      • ‘The character of Selina Davis in Jazz - which is adapted from a short story by Jean Rhys - is a prime example.’
      • ‘The same can be said of any number of films adapted from fiction and nonfiction sources.’
      amend, emend, correct, alter, change, edit, copy-edit, rewrite, redraft, rescript, recast, rephrase, rework, update, revamp
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Origin

Late Middle English: from French adapter, from Latin adaptare, from ad- to + aptare (from aptus fit).

Pronunciation:

adapt

/əˈdapt/