Definition of acrimony in English:

acrimony

noun

mass noun
  • Bitterness or ill feeling.

    ‘the AGM dissolved into acrimony’
    • ‘Money can't buy you love, sang the Beatles but what's clear is it can certainly create a lot of acrimony where love once existed.’
    • ‘The relationship has dissolved in acrimony as accusations are levelled by both sides.’
    • ‘The whole area was poisoned by anger and acrimony.’
    • ‘It's only recently and as a result of all the bitter acrimony that he realised that they can't sort it out.’
    • ‘For this relationship is, in practice, fraught with mutual antagonism and conducted through mutual acrimony.’
    • ‘And yet we've had so much acrimony over the past few years that the public has risen up against it.’
    • ‘In the past, especially during election time, the issue of money has raised unnecessary tension and acrimony.’
    • ‘I really believe that it is better for couples to separate as amicably as possible and give their children a chance to grow up without daily misery and acrimony.’
    • ‘Long-term damage can be caused to children exposed to acrimony and bitterness in family breakdown.’
    • ‘It was a match dripping in acrimony, disappointment and what might have been.’
    • ‘The band split up earlier this year amid bitterness and acrimony.’
    • ‘Whatever the outcome of this particular dispute, though, these homes have to be built somewhere and the less acrimony with which it can be done the better.’
    • ‘And then inevitably something would go wrong, and it would end in acrimony and sometimes in lawsuits.’
    • ‘Isn't it unsurprising how settling a lawsuit does nothing to settle the underlying acrimony that motivated it?’
    • ‘The whole partnership then dissolved into acrimony and mistrust and legal wrangling.’
    • ‘Despite some brief acrimony, a year later nothing much had changed.’
    • ‘The resulting acrimony helped ensure that it would take a while to forge working alliances on the new council.’
    • ‘Large disparities in the contributions member nations were expected to make to the EU budget caused no small amount of acrimony.’
    • ‘But what should have been one of the publishing events of this year has now descended into astonishing depths of bitterness and acrimony.’
    • ‘There was no acrimony, and no ill-will towards the national organisation.’
    bitterness, rancour, resentment, ill feeling, ill will, bad blood, animosity, hostility, enmity, antagonism, irascibility, waspishness, spleen
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 16th century (in the sense ‘bitter taste or smell’): from French acrimonie or Latin acrimonia, from acer, acri- ‘pungent, acrid’.

Pronunciation

acrimony

/ˈakrɪməni/