Definition of aconite in English:

aconite

noun

  • 1A poisonous plant of the buttercup family, bearing hooded pink or purple flowers and found in temperate regions of the northern hemisphere.

    • ‘Other plants in the fragrant garden include a cherry plum which is allegedly a remedy for stress and anxiety and aconite, a toxic plant which in small doses is claimed to be good for colds.’
    • ‘Saturn also rules over many of the herbs that are potentially poisonous or toxic (eg., aconite, helleborus, nightshade).’
    • ‘This would allow for the use of a variety of familiar medicinal herbs, including poisonous plants like aconite.’
    • ‘Other herbs, such as pinellia ternata, aconite and arisaema, are generally detoxified before use in various ways and are no longer considered poisonous.’
    1. 1.1mass noun An extract of aconite, used as a poison or in pharmacy.
      • ‘She was given Du Huo Angelica and Loranthes Combination (Du Huo Ji Sheng Tang) with the addition of 4 gms of prepared aconite to relieve the chronic arthritic condition and pains.’
      • ‘It deserves notice that he experimented with the most boasted substances - cinchona, aconite, mercury, bryonia, belladonna.’
      • ‘Licorice is combined with prepared aconite to counteract its toxicity.’
      • ‘The Three Arterial Sedatives: veratrum, aconite and gelsemium.’
      • ‘However, to understand the more subtle indications we might get a clue from the homeopathic indication for aconite which are symptoms caused by shock.’
      • ‘Another doctor who killed his three wives, this time with aconite, escaped the hangman's noose by taking cyanide.’
      • ‘In the UK, although the legal situation is somewhat ambiguous, it appears that all forms of aconite are effectively banned for internal use.’
      • ‘Important are the accounts of opium, aconite, hemlock, and the thorn apple, showing careful study of widely known poisons.’
      • ‘The Chinese medical diagnosis was water qi disease, thus ginseng and aconite were used, as indicated for yin type edema.’
      • ‘Other kidney tonics based on Rehmannia 6 add more ingredients, such as cinnamon bark and aconite, to warm the kidneys.’
      • ‘Pinellia combination with aconite - the strongest, with double aconite, it works overnight.’
      • ‘Some of these methods such as the detoxification of aconite by preparing it with salt and/or long boiling decoction are a mainstay of TCM practice.’
      • ‘For Spleen and Kidney Yang Deficiency characterized by coughing of thin, watery sputum, deep pulse and urinary problems, add Cinnamon Bark and prepared aconite.’
      • ‘In the Book of Venoms, he listed arsenic, aconite, hellebore, laurel, opium, bryony, mandrake, leopard's gall, and menstrual blood.’
      • ‘She is familiar with aconite; it's usually the first remedy I reach for when a child starts to feel sick.’
      • ‘A friend says: ‘I had the flu and aconite fixed me in one day.’’
      • ‘Both Rehmannia six and Rehmannia eight, the latter with the addition of cinnamon bark and prepared aconite are the two most frequently prescribed formulas used for tonifying kidney yin and yang respectively’
      • ‘Have been necking vitamin C, zinc, garlic pills, gelsemium, aconite and lucozade in attempt to get rid of it.’
      • ‘It is used by itself to treat most metabolic poisons (including poisoning by aconite and overuse of ephedrine and other stimulants).’
      • ‘In fact baking or cooking for a long time in pressurized hot water can help to neutralize the toxic aconitum in raw aconite.’
  • 2A small herbaceous Eurasian plant, cultivated for its yellow flowers in early spring.

    • ‘Snowdrops and winter aconites herald the transition between winter and spring.’
    • ‘Lift, divide and spread out winter aconites while still in leaf.’
    • ‘Why aren't the aconites and snowdrops showing and out first?’
    • ‘Loaded, I made for St Mary's Church in the corner, with a graveyard, an Anglo-Saxon shaft, and bright with snowdrops and aconites.’
    • ‘The snowdrops and aconites are nearly over but crocuses and daffodils are taking their place in the spotlight, and the foliage of early tulips may be poking through already.’
    • ‘Here there's a nice 1898 Arts and Crafts style house, sheltered by beech copses with kettle nest boxes and carpeted yellow by winter aconites.’
    • ‘To naturalize bulbs in your lawn, choose bulbs that blossom and fade before grass grows vigorously and requires mowing: crocus, winter aconite, snowdrops, and scilla.’
    • ‘One of its manifestations was naturalistic sweeps of winter aconite, bluebells, daffodils or anemones multiplying by the thousands in woodlands.’
    • ‘Pack spaces with spring bulbs - aconites, miniature daffodils, little tulips - anything you fancy.’
    • ‘So do bulbs such as winter aconite, crocus, snowdrop, Iris reticulata, and Cyclamen coum.’
    • ‘At Huggate, due to a microclimate or the vagaries of the night, it was mild and spring-like; and a thrush sang the chance of snowdrops and winter aconites.’
    • ‘Here there are obvious earth shapes that tell of a village abandoned in the seventeenth century, and we saw a lovely patch of snowdrops and aconites, the prettiest harbingers of spring.’
    • ‘Once off the A19, the roads to Kepwick were bordered by thick drifts of snowdrops and we found more growing alongside winter aconite in the small churchyard.’
    • ‘Today there is new crocus, white and yellow, yellow aconite, and a strange, small saffron flower, contained by broad shafts of weed.’
    • ‘Carefully rake leaves away from clumps of snowdrops and aconites, replanting any that have been lifted by frost.’
    • ‘Just as endearing as the snowdrop is eranthis hyemalis, commonly known as the winter aconite.’
    • ‘By early March, Lakes & Rivers gardeners are heartened by the blossoms of winter aconite, glory of the snow, snowdrops and snowflakes.’
    • ‘One of the earliest is the winter aconite Eranthis hymalis, whose little rounded yellow flowers start appearing shortly after New Year.’
    • ‘It's attached to the winter aconite, Eranthis hyemalis and also to a type of horsetail, Equisetum hyemale.’

Origin

Mid 16th century: via French and Latin from Greek akoniton.

Pronunciation

aconite

/ˈakənʌɪt/