Definition of Acmeist in English:

Acmeist

adjective

  • Relating to or denoting an early 20th-century movement in Russian poetry which rejected the values of symbolism in favour of formal technique and clarity of exposition. Notable members were Anna Akhmatova and Osip Mandelstam.

    • ‘Of the early pop groups, Acquarium was the most influential; its lyrics echoed the officially disapproved pre-1914 Acmeist poems, as the official watchdogs were among the first to observe.’
    • ‘Gumilev's lyric persona is again hidden behind a mask, this time that of a Chinese poet and philosopher, thereby preserving impersonality, one of the basic Acmeist requirements.’
    • ‘Her collections of poetry Evening, Rosary, White Flock, Plantain, Anno Domini MCMXXI, bringing Acmeist clarity to the delineation of personal feeling, won her enormous renown.’

noun

  • A member of the Acmeist movement.

    • ‘If the Symbolists and Acmeists revered the past, the Futurists - at least the Cubo-Futurists, who represented the most extreme of several Futurist camps - claimed to reject it entirely.’
    • ‘Kuzmin had already broken earlier with Gumilev and the Acmeists and, therefore, he was compelled to look for contact with ‘independent’ publishing organizations.’
    • ‘Being a well-read person, he has also been influenced by Acmeists, Imagists and Spanish Modernists.’
    • ‘Because the Acmeists (like the American Imagists) broke with exhausted conventions and vague mysticism, Mandelstam is sometimes mistaken for a chilly realist.’
    • ‘Six poets Gumilyov, Akhmatova, Osip Mandelshtam, Sergey Gorodetsky, Vladimir Narbut and Mikhail Zenkevich joined forces, calling themselves the Acmeists.’
    • ‘For example, the book includes three wonderful versions of Akhmatova, every bit as muscular as their originals and with something of the compact yet vivid Russian of the Acmeists.’
    • ‘The leading Acmeists were Gumilev, Anna Akhmatova, and Osip Mandelstam.’
    • ‘She was a leading light in a group of poets known as Acmeists.’
    • ‘By contrast, the Acmeists demanded a return to clarity, specificity, the concrete.’
    • ‘He, Akhmatova and her first husband Nikolay Gumilev, had founded the Guild of Poets called the Acmeists in 1911.’
    • ‘Bagritsky's first poems were in imitation of the Acmeists, a literary group of the early 1900s that advocated a concrete, individualistic realism, stressing visual vividness, emotional intensity, and verbal freshness.’
    • ‘The nucleus of the group later became known as Acmeists, the manifesto for which was written by Mandelshtam in 1913.’
    • ‘Australia's own independent and combative literary tradition has led to the present range of Australian poetry, enhanced by influences ranging from the Acmeists to Williams and Ashbery.’
    • ‘Formed as a reaction to the Symbolist movement, the Acmeists, as they became known, called for a return to the use of clear, precise and concrete imagery.’

Pronunciation:

Acmeist

/ˈakmiːɪst/