Definition of acausal in English:

acausal

adjective

  • Not governed or operating by the laws of cause and effect.

    • ‘Heath classes them as dealing with energy transfer, electromagnetism, mind-matter interplay, and acausal factors.’
    • ‘The nominalist points out that it is a downright mystery how human beings, as physical creatures in a physical universe, can have knowledge of the eternal, detached, acausal mathematical realm.’
    • ‘His notion of synchronicity is that there is an acausal principle that links events having a similar meaning by their coincidence in time rather than sequentially.’
    • ‘It's an attitude that's rife in magic because of its acausal nature (cause and effect can't be empirically linked).’
    • ‘He described synchronicity as an acausal principle that links events having a similar meaning by their coincidence in time.’
    • ‘A common response to such an acausal happening is a sharpening of attention, a sense of the closeness of something unseen.’
    • ‘If QM was as acausal as some people think, then we should not assume that these phenomena have a cause.’
    • ‘But if the recurrence time of each time-path were immensely longer than the present age of the expanding universe then we would have yet to experience these strange acausal effects.’
    • ‘I believe magick is acausal and atemporal, so I would say ‘no’.’
    • ‘With the exception of politically influenced modern Chinese works, acupuncture and East Asian traditional medicine are founded on a non-reductionist, non-dualist, acausal paradigm.’
    • ‘Jung intuitively felt this pointed to an acausal archetypal order at the root of all phenomena which is responsible for the meaningfulness implicit in the coincidence of associated physical and mental events.’

Pronunciation:

acausal

/eɪˈkɔːz(ə)l/