Definition of academy in English:

academy

noun

  • 1A place of study or training in a special field.

    ‘a police academy’
    • ‘The victim was a 24-year-old recent graduate of a police academy that has received support and guidance from coalition forces.’
    • ‘After graduation, I was accepted into the police academy's six-month training program to become an officer.’
    • ‘In fact he became a police recruit, joining the force and training at an academy in North Wales.’
    • ‘Tony Blair has formally opened a training academy for teachers known as the Sandhurst for teachers.’
    • ‘During the year the academy will provide training support for the athletes including the use of biokinetics and a course in special nutrition to enhance the athletes' performances.’
    • ‘We see a class at the police academy that behaves like a bunch of high school kids.’
    • ‘Members of the Homeless Power Project also have met with police recruits at the training academy and at some precincts.’
    • ‘After I graduated from college, I entered the police academy.’
    • ‘He may have shunned the British academies for a training school in Barcelona, where he has honed his skills as a clay court exponent rather than a grass aficionado, but he still counts British No 1, Henman, as a role model.’
    • ‘President Bush delivered the commencement address at the Air Force academy today.’
    • ‘Rookie cops graduate from the police academy anxious to collar real criminals.’
    • ‘In the training academy, I'll be running five miles a day.’
    • ‘Smithson argues that fire and police academies should offer this training.’
    • ‘Many of the youngsters graduated from tennis academies rather than high schools, and they're not the best conversationalists.’
    • ‘The day she graduated from high school, she signed up for the police academy.’
    • ‘The academy has vigorous training and fitness programmes.’
    • ‘The long days studying in class and endless hours of physical training at the academy paid off in ways Richard had probably never imagined.’
    • ‘It's not like she goes to the police academy to train and prepare herself for things like this.’
    • ‘All three graduated from the police academy at Yuba County Community College.’
    • ‘He went to Florida January 2, still limping badly, to focus on the NFL by working out and living at a training academy owned by the IMG agency.’
    educational institution, training establishment, centre of learning
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    1. 1.1dated A place of study.
      ‘he was educated privately at academies in Margate’
      • ‘The founding of elementary schools, academies, and universities was an important part of the reform movement.’
      • ‘By 1825, 177 private academies were established, 13 of which were for girls.’
      • ‘The seminary offered women more of a liberal education than the grade-school academies.’
      • ‘They came together in a variety of salons, private academies, libraries and the like, enjoying the discreet but effective patronage of princes, ministers, and aristocrats.’
      • ‘She had decided that I was becoming too much like a boy and requested I to be sent off to my all girls academy to be educated and taught how to be proper.’
      • ‘In Nicholas Nickleby, he crusaded against another institution, the so-called private academies for unwanted children.’
      • ‘After 1830, free settlers began to arrive and the musical public grew in numbers, establishing chamber music concerts, visits by virtuoso soloists, and private music academies.’
      • ‘Due to Coffin's influence, the Coffin School, a private academy on Nantucket reopened in 1903.’
      • ‘In London, Daisy had been educated at an academy for young ladies where she gained a reputation as an extrovert.’
      • ‘The Dublin Society was founded in 1731 to promote Irish agriculture and manufactures, and during the 1740s absorbed a local academy to provide a training for arts and crafts.’
      • ‘More than providing vocational and academic training, the academies provided a web of valuable future contacts.’
      • ‘Entry was difficult - among the artists who failed the examinations were Rodin and Vuillard - and students often preferred the private academies.’
      • ‘A sign reads Mugen High School: The private academy for elegant young woman.’
      educational institution, training establishment, centre of learning
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 (in England) an inner-city school which is funded by the government and sometimes also by a private individual or organization but is not controlled by the local authority.
      • ‘Academies are usually built to replace existing struggling schools, the running costs being funded directly by the Government rather than via the local education authority.’
      • ‘His father intended him for the Presbyterian ministry and sent him to a dissenting academy, first at Gloucester and then at Tewkesbury.’
      • ‘Ministers want to see 200 academies set up to replace failing schools by 2010, partly supported by some of the richest people in the country.’
      • ‘The second proposed city academy in Islington is to be built out of the closure of Islington Green.’
      • ‘Independent schools are also coming under pressure to invest more money in facilities as the Government invests in new secondary schools and academies.’
    3. 1.3Scottish, US A secondary school, in the US typically a private one.
      ‘Mark left St Andrews Academy with five highers, and studied maths at Glasgow University’
      • ‘Clarendon County whites resisted integration and created private academies that exist today.’
      • ‘Blacks attend the public schools; most whites attend private academies.’
      • ‘Unlike traditional state-funded schools, city academies benefit from private sponsorship as well as government funding.’
      • ‘The top schools would be reserved for the wealthiest layers of society, who could pay to send their children to elite private schools and academies.’
      • ‘There were few luxuries and certainly no thought of private academies.’
      • ‘For example, McConnell is resisting the idea of city academies, which use private funds and expertise, despite offers of support from Irvine Laidlaw, one of the country's richest men.’
      • ‘Still other White students fled to segregated private academies.’
      • ‘Their children attend private academies and may occasionally speak to one of the Peasantry as the latter mows the grass or cleans the house.’
      • ‘He carried the habit through a number of upscale academies and prep schools, managing to get routinely expelled for poor marks and a strong anti-authoritarian streak.’
      • ‘The Emmanuel Schools Foundation last month announced its interest in sponsoring a new academy to replace Northcliffe Secondary School, which is in special measures.’
      • ‘English is commonly taught in the public schools, and sometimes French is offered in private academies.’
      • ‘Secondary head teachers said academies should be encouraged to collaborate with neighbouring schools.’
      • ‘A child of the civil rights movement, she attended integrated schools and sends her son to one of Atlanta's tony private academies.’
      • ‘Her father had no idea she was enrolled in a private academy.’
      • ‘City academies are publicly-funded independent secondary schools, given more freedom than normal state schools to help them raise standards in disadvantaged urban areas.’
      • ‘Independent schools are also coming under pressure to invest more money in facilities as the Government invests in new secondary schools and academies.’
      • ‘Government plans to create more specialist secondary schools and privately managed city academies were also condemned.’
      • ‘They were twins who had just transferred from a private academy.’
      • ‘What happened to the white children who didn't transfer to private academies but stayed in the public schools after they were desegregated?’
      • ‘They insisted on calling her Chaelia and sending her to a private academy for schooling.’
    4. 1.4the Academy The teaching school founded by Plato.
  • 2A society or institution of distinguished scholars and artists or scientists that aims to promote and maintain standards in its particular field.

    ‘the Royal Academy of Arts’
    • ‘He refused to accept honorary degrees but he did accept honorary membership of academies and learned societies.’
    • ‘The Royal Society is an independent academy promoting the natural and applied sciences.’
    • ‘By the end of the 17th century, new societies and academies devoted to science were founded.’
    • ‘Other new venues for elite cultural exchange could be found in literary societies, and learned academies, modelled after the French Academy in Paris.’
    • ‘He was appointed to numerous academies and societies in Canada and abroad including Honorary Consulting Physician at three different Ontario hospitals and the Chair of Medical Research.’
    • ‘He was elected an honorary member of over twenty learned societies and academies world-wide.’
    • ‘AAAS was founded in 1848, and reports some 265 affiliated societies and academies of science, serving 10 million individuals.’
    • ‘Vigorous debates, in the press, in the world of letters, and in learned societies and academies, testified to the worries of educated men that they faced a crisis that would soon be beyond control.’
    • ‘He is to step down as chairman of the institution after artists at the academy called for his resignation.’
    • ‘China has an official art scene with academies, art institutions and regular print exhibitions with awards and prices.’
    • ‘Xie is not a member of either the Chinese Academy of Sciences or Chinese Academy of Engineering, two academies for top Chinese scientists.’
    • ‘Mayflower will now also receive additional funding from the independent scientific academy The Royal Society, freeing up Government money for other subjects.’
    • ‘The U.S. National Academy of Sciences is a model for other societies and academies.’
    • ‘Nine years ago, he and a dozen sports medicine doctors formed the academy to promote anti-aging treatments and to learn more about the long-term effects.’
    • ‘The Government has established 10 academies for encouraging cultural activities.’
    • ‘Hamilton was showered with medals and honours by the academies and learned societies of the world.’
    • ‘Nor was it created in the image of the great European scientific societies or academies that were dedicated to research alone.’
    • ‘He was elected to honorary membership of eighteen academies and learned societies in Europe, India, and the United States.’
    • ‘Eleven companies and one individual were honored with the academy's distinguished awards.’
    • ‘The 345-year-old Society is the national academy of science of the United Kingdom.’
    organization, establishment, institution, foundation, centre
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Origin

Late Middle English (denoting the garden where Plato taught): from French académie or Latin academia, from Greek akadēmeia, from Akadēmos, the hero after whom Plato's garden was named.

Pronunciation

academy

/əˈkadəmi/