Definition of academical in English:

academical

adjective

  • Relating to a college or university.

    ‘the academical year’
    • ‘For mathematics, at that time with us, were scarce looked on as academical studies, but rather mechanical - as the business of traders, merchants, seamen, carpenters, surveyors of lands and the like.’
    • ‘[From Vivaculus:]… I hasted to London, and entreated one of my academical acquaintances to introduce me into some of the little societies of literature which are formed in taverns and coffee - houses.’
    • ‘He spoke, too, of the quality of food at his university, the exquisiteness of the Institute, which has a small library, but choice - and can call upon the Firestone to fulfill all of the scholars’ more obscure academical desires.’
    • ‘So the case is interesting from academical point of view, but not a real threat to the users.’
    • ‘‘In 1900, its name was changed to Stovia at the time when it had reached full academical status,’ said Savitri Prastiti Scherer in her book titled Keselarasan dan Kejanggalan Pemikiran-Pemikiran Priayi Nationalis Jawa AwalAbad XX.’
    • ‘So despite its essentially iconoclastic, subversive nature, photography permits, even encourages, the sporadic establishment of canons, traditions, and an academical standardization of ideas.’
    • ‘And how well do we planners help our institutions as the academical village goes global?’
    • ‘He was created ‘poet-laureate’ by the universities of Oxford, Louvain, and Cambridge, an academical distinction.’
    • ‘Until we get our education upon a more spiritual foundation instead of being content with mere academical scholarship, more of character training than standard of knowledge, we shall only have the veneer.’
    • ‘Now here is a brilliant group of musicians, each a virtuoso in his own right, with strings of academical achievement behind their music.’

noun

British
dated
  • Formal university attire.

    ‘the procession was robed in academicals’

Pronunciation:

academical

/akəˈdɛmɪk(ə)l/