Definition of acacia in English:

acacia

(also acacia tree)

noun

  • A tree or shrub of warm climates which bears spikes or clusters of yellow or white flowers and is typically thorny.

    Also called wattle, especially in Australia
    • ‘Ngar said authorities in the past introduced pioneer species such as acacias and eucalypts that adapted quickly to badly eroded areas on barren land.’
    • ‘Spread out below the ridge is a remarkable expanse of woodlands, an acacia and eucalypt plain of shimmering leaf canopy that extends to the coast.’
    • ‘Scattered trees, mainly acacias and junipers, dot the savanna.’
    • ‘That is where you've got grazing land largely, and it appears that the woody vegetation, trees, eucalypts and acacias, native pines and other shrubs, are becoming denser and denser.’
    • ‘Alerted by phone, the local authorities had come to see what was happening in Mekhembar, a village of 1,500 people set among thorny acacias and baobab trees with their bulging trunks.’
    • ‘The place I chose is under a small-leaved acacia tree, with a little direct sun on the water in the morning.’
    • ‘The expanse of space south of Arcadia up the steep ridge will, over a period of some 20 years, be denuded of its black wattles and gum trees, and be replaced with indigenous acacias and proteas.’
    • ‘A well-planted aviary, especially with native species of trees or shrubs like acacia or eucalyptus, is ideal.’
    • ‘A bachelor group will arrive at a promising nesting site (adorned with lots of acacia or palm trees, and usually near water), and the males will quickly begin constructing their beautiful vase-like nests out of grass.’
    • ‘When particular plants flower in sequence, I have seen the same natural area bathed in the yellow of acacias, white of tea-trees, or pink and purple.’
    • ‘THESE LITTLE acacia and bird cherry trees look a little out of place as they rock in tandem with the waves in the backwaters.’
    • ‘I was once asked by my neighbours whether I would mind very much if they were to hop across and chop down the acacias and pines at the bottom of our garden.’
    • ‘Kruger spreads over nearly 20,000 sq km of unspoilt scrubland punctuated by acacia and mopane trees.’
    • ‘There is the touch of the camel-thorn acacia that has just been grazed by a giraffe, and the smell of wild sage as you brush past it in the bush.’
    • ‘Even the ostrich squawk as they make their way across the sandvelt to open marshlands and savannahs dotted with acacia, baobab trees and wild sage bushes.’
    • ‘No people, no houses, no cars, just a wilderness of river-gum trees lining ancient waterless riverbeds, acacias, spinifex grasses and spooky giant termite mounds.’
    • ‘The Plaza, with its canopy of acacias, jacarandas and monkey-puzzles offers an oasis of calm from both the traffic noise and soaring heat of midday.’
    • ‘In and around the Olympic village, acacias and evergreen Holm oaks are given prominence.’
    • ‘One day Rabbit sat down beside a flowering acacia tree and looked up at the bright yellow flowers, the rough bark and the sturdy limbs stretching toward the sun.’
    • ‘The A to Z of conservatory plants starts with the feathery yellow flowers of the acacia in bloom from December to March.’

Origin

Late Middle English: via Latin from Greek akakia.

Pronunciation:

acacia

/əˈkeɪʃə/