Definition of abut in English:

abut

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 (of a building or an area of land) be next to or have a common boundary with:

    ‘gardens abutting Great Prescott Street’
    [no object] ‘a park abutting on an area of waste land’
    • ‘Many local forest dwellers and people inhabiting areas abutting forests utilise their traditional skills combined with their knowledge of the interiors of the forests to hunt and set traps for our threatened wildlife.’
    • ‘The six floor apartment building abuts the Fort Hamilton Army Base, a quarter mile away and is at the virtual foot of the Brooklyn side of the Verrazzano Bridge.’
    • ‘The constant loud volume isn't a problem out of season, but when summer comes and Nigel and Hermione rent out the cottages abutting their Georgian farmhouse, she has to explain that not everyone likes waking up to ‘Sunshine of Your Love’.’
    • ‘White-painted frame buildings abutting a tree shaded green - this is the object of an enduring collective memory.’
    • ‘Their house abuts the rare Mexican golf club, where the older boys, Javier and Alejandro, and Lorena and her younger sister, Daniela, putted after dinner in the dark.’
    • ‘Exactly behind the new residential buildings abutting the Opera House forecourt is the Tarpeian Way, but the public viewing platform is gone.’
    • ‘Because the former Canal Zone abuts the old city on the north and west, the growing population was forced to fan out along the bay to the north and east.’
    • ‘Her (now ex-) husband's family had been farmers on this part of the Chilterns for a couple of generations and the pub abutted their land.’
    • ‘Montgomery County, Maryland, a fast-growing suburban area abutting Washington, D.C., was one of the hotbeds of the postwar cooperative nursery school movement.’
    • ‘But supposing somebody is in a hotel abutting a public place and insults his wife in a hotel room, that would be an offence under this section, would it not?’
    • ‘Outside the Dakota County Jail in Hastings, expensive town homes abut open fields, and a steady stream of high-end cars makes its way into the bustling strip mall across the street.’
    • ‘Sentenced to hard labor, most of Angola's lifers work in the fields abutting the Mississippi.’
    • ‘I was so amazed and my eyes so confused that finally I had to pull off the freeway and creep slowly into the parking lot of a service station abutting a field.’
    • ‘Baloyi works as a gardener at 84 Dundalk Avenue, the house abutting the intersection.’
    • ‘With these sites abutting each other and with the appointment of such celebrated architects, it seems likely that a major arts centre is about to be created.’
    • ‘The larger is called Packhouse Field, which on its northern boundary abuts the Defendant's land.’
    • ‘Three farms abut our little village, and recently all three have come on to the market, the houses available apart from the land.’
    • ‘The move involves the north-central area of the township abutting Murrysville.’
    • ‘What remains certain is that the area abutting Clifford's Tower is a mess at present and has been so for years.’
    • ‘A huge three-story mall abuts the old Menger Hotel, with high skylights and gleaming tile floors.’
    neighbouring, adjacent, adjoining, next-door, bordering, abutting
    beside, next door to, alongside, at the side of, by the side of, abreast of, by, adjacent to, cheek by jowl with, side by side with
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Touch or lean on:
      ‘masonry may crumble where a roof abuts it’
      • ‘S5 abuts the right heart border medially, while S4 extends to and comprises a portion of the lateral border of the right lung.’
      • ‘S8 and S10 have the largest surface areas abutting the diaphragm.’
      • ‘The posterior extrascapulars also abut anteriorly against this median bone, but without touching each other, so that the commissure does not cross the midline.’
      • ‘Rather, they tend to develop in the many nooks and crannies formed where roof planes intersect, or where roofs abut walls.’
      • ‘On the symphyseal side, the concavity abuts a ridge that borders the straight symphyseal surface of the plate.’
      • ‘Isolation joints are necessary in parking lots anywhere the pavement abuts another structure such as a building or light-pole foundation.’
      • ‘If partless, how can part of atom X abut or join with part of atom Y?’
      • ‘That edge was to be held in place by pieces of wood pressed firmly against the outside of the central gutter where it abutted the existing felt roof.’
      • ‘As these stories abut one another, metaphorically touching the reader's own, they become altered, subsequently transforming in tone, texture, reality.’
      adjoin, be adjacent to, border, butt up against, butt up to, be next to, neighbour, verge on, join, touch, meet, reach, impinge on, be contiguous with
      View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: the sense ‘have a common boundary’ from Anglo-Latin abuttare, from a- (from Latin ad to, at) + Old French but end; the sense ‘lean upon’ (late 16th century) from Old French abouter, from a- (from Latin ad to, at) + bouter strike, butt, of Germanic origin.

Pronunciation:

abut

/əˈbʌt/