Definition of absurdism in English:

absurdism

noun

  • 1Intentionally ridiculous or bizarre behaviour or character.

    ‘the absurdism of the Dada movement’
    • ‘As the work proceeds, it begins to transcend its own absurdism.’
    • ‘The early '90s series was a glorious slice of absurdism that featured sketches about people eating Muppets and delivering tacos instead of mail.’
    • ‘The satire seems a bit vanilla but it's a family film so I'm not expecting total absurdism.’
    • ‘Adams' innovation was to adapt the absurdism of Monty Python to the venue that best suited it.’
    • ‘Some people just don't get this film and believe that the Coens are trotting out weak absurdism to disguise and buttress a genre storyline.’
    • ‘But in spite of some of the absurdism of this screenplay, it's really an intimate, fairly direct examination of self-awareness.’
    • ‘I first encountered Wright when I was a nerdy teenager, and thought his unique style of clever deadpan absurdism was just about the coolest thing ever.’
    • ‘Trading in a unique mix of absurdism and knowingly ancient music hall puns, slapstick, and gentle songs, the Gang was an essentially theatrical phenomenon.’
    • ‘However, the serious subject matter is often played for laughs rather than the absurdism it requires.’
    • ‘He uses various comic conventions such as satire, farce, absurdism, and irony to attack widely divergent cultural philosophies, politics, and ethics.’
  • 2The belief that human beings exist in a purposeless, chaotic universe.

    • ‘Design, costume, acting, and theatrical bells and whistles made for an impressive production, turning what could have been an arid treatise on French existentialism into a vivid piece of camp absurdism.’
    • ‘Gain is novelist Richard Powers's attempt to make up this lost ground in one great pole vault; to loft the novel of American enterprise over the old swamps of socialism, Darwinism, and absurdism into a new place.’
    • ‘It's got sex, violence, absurdism, politics (including a wicked parody of Western European and American leaders) and lots and lots of drugs.’
    • ‘It is tarted up with shopworn absurdism, as when a moronic computer programmer jumps off that roof only to reappear without explanation to continue being moronic.’
    • ‘Chaplin's appeal was perhaps a bit more audience-pleasing; certainly, he was much more sentimental than Keaton, whose predilection for absurdism ultimately led to collaborations with existentialist Samuel Beckett.’
    • ‘He uses various comic conventions such as satire, farce, absurdism, and irony to attack widely divergent cultural philosophies, politics, and ethics as well as social, moral, and racial biases.’
    • ‘This little nugget of absurdism would be downright ingenious were it intentional but regrettably, any similarity to actual postmodern intellectual thought is purely coincidental.’
    • ‘‘Maria Maria Maria’ is simply gorgeous - a dark, reverb-soaked slab of despondency with a lyrical combination of absurdism and sincerity that could only have come from Merritt.’
    • ‘The most obvious link with Beckett is absurdism.’
    • ‘I understand the argument that Kafka's writing and his place in the history of existentialism helped to pave the way for absurdism in theatre, but absurdist plays work best when they make us laugh.’
    • ‘The detective story is superficially part of the hard-boiled tradition, but a vein of absurdism, a hint of Kafka, distorts the naturalism.’
    • ‘David Lynch used the same technique of dramatically over-extended emotion to telling effect in Twin Peaks, but both contemporary satirists have really borrowed the idea from the high avatar of absurdism Samuel Beckett.’
    • ‘Mud, River, Stone makes light of reality without transporting us to realms of poetry, philosophy, or absurdism where this would no longer matter.’
    • ‘Under the influence of European absurdism, the climate of contemporary American theater has shifted.’
    • ‘Full of witty non-sequiturs and theatre in-jokes, the play has long had an enthusiastic following, but does its existential absurdism survive the leap from the stage to the screen?’
    • ‘Blood Sonata is born of Artaud's theatre of cruelty and raised on Beckett's absurdism: it is not about anything.’
    • ‘Dada is as extinct as the dodo, and absurdism (which, by the way, never called itself that) gave Surrealism a different spin.’
    • ‘Trading in a unique mix of absurdism and knowingly ancient music hall puns and wheezes, slapstick, cross-talk and gentle songs, the Gang was an essentially theatrical phenomenon.’
    • ‘Early in his career, Pinter denied that he wrote symbolically, partly because critics tried to associate him with absurdism.’
    • ‘Sterns personifies the quirky absurdism of her writing.’

Pronunciation:

absurdism

/əbˈsəːdɪz(ə)m/