Definition of abominable in English:

abominable

adjective

  • 1Causing moral revulsion:

    ‘the uprising was suppressed with abominable cruelty’
    • ‘By mid afternoon the whole world was converging on America as the horrifying and abominable events unfolded.’
    • ‘This was a horrifying and abominable thing to do.’
    • ‘So even right here in the city you can find the most abominable poverty living almost cheek by jowl with these extraordinary lavish wasteful expenditures.’
    • ‘If the point of the infamous anti-gay group that inflicted itself on New Mexico the other day was to gain media attention with outlandish prejudice, vile slogans and abominable signs - it succeeded.’
    • ‘IT is an abominable, insidious, and wholly unnecessary piece of legislation that ought never to have been conceived, far less passed by both Houses of Parliament and put into the statute books of this country.’
    • ‘Since emancipation, countless people have written about the cruelties of slavery but does anyone actually know how this abominable procedure started?’
    • ‘As he read the novel, its nihilism and careless insensitivity to Nazi anti-Semitism were shocking, even abominable.’
    • ‘The effect of this abominable behaviour by the killers is that the locals have abandoned activities like agriculture and other economic ventures for fear of being butchered.’
    • ‘Even in the rooting out of something as abominable as pedophilia, the play shows, other moral truths can be lost.’
    • ‘And that, fundamentally is what was so abominable about apartheid.’
    • ‘Has that country gone back to the Stone Age to allow such abominable behaviour?’
    • ‘Members of the SWC jury said, while commenting on one case, that infanticide is an abominable crime and those who commit it cannot be exonerated, whatever the extenuating circumstances.’
    • ‘For years now I have been against capital punishment, arguing that killing someone either illegally or legally was the most abominable and most repugnant of crimes.’
    • ‘Of course, in reality-that is, in the universe beyond the boundaries of our conceptual vocabularies-homosexuality is no more abominable than lobsters or flying squirrels.’
    • ‘From beginning to end, we are prey to the movie's diabolical killer, who presents us with a variety of abominable ways to slay and mutilate his victims.’
    • ‘And there are certain crimes still that are so heinous, so wretched, and so abominable that, yes, they do cry out for vengeance, and they do cry out for the death penalty.’
    • ‘Lalla, in his opening remarks, told Wellington the prosecution had to be ‘the most vile and most abominable abuse of the prosecutorial process in the country.’’
    • ‘Some of them are obviously indulging in terrorism, and there can be absolutely no doubt that to take hostages or beheading innocent captives is an abominable crime against humanity.’
    • ‘The couple nodded in agreement with her, and I became aware that I had somehow stumbled across a house of covert dissidents who I'd always been told were the most abominable and despicable of all people.’
    • ‘Here's someone who fought for one of the most abominable causes of all time, yet has acted with rationality, courage, and honour.’
    loathsome, detestable, hateful, odious, obnoxious, despicable, contemptible, damnable, cursed, accursed, diabolical
    disgusting, revolting, repellent, repulsive, offensive, repugnant, abhorrent, reprehensible, atrocious, horrifying, execrable
    foul, vile, wretched, base, miserable, horrible, awful, dreadful, appalling, abysmal, brutal, nauseating
    horrid, nasty, disagreeable, unpleasant, distasteful
    terrible, shocking, god-awful, beastly
    chronic
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Very bad; terrible:
      ‘what an abominable mess!’
      • ‘The drainage system is abominable, and a slight drizzle causes water-logging.’
      • ‘Her handwriting is abominable, like one-legged chickens tied together and walking from and ink well onto paper.’
      • ‘They walk a short distance and enjoy a normal school life without having to worry about the abominable weather, let alone the wind.’
      • ‘Then I summarize the reasons for which it is an absolutely abominable film?’
      • ‘I've been a passionate advocate for us to end this quite abominable system we have in Australia of forcing people to vote and making people guilty of an offence if they choose not to vote.’
      • ‘The company should not be running this, they have an abominable track record.’
      • ‘Even non-medical people are aware that cholera is an abominable disease whose source is filth.’
      • ‘In addition to all this, I have intensified my studies of the Bulgarian language since after six years my local communications skills are abominable.’
      • ‘‘What happened after the game was simply abominable,’ said a member of the supervisory council of Levski, Todor Batkov.’
      • ‘Indeed, the match furnished the quickest booking this reporter has ever witnessed, St Mirren defender Kevin McGowne felling Paul Sheerin with an abominable tackle after just 25 seconds.’
      • ‘These songs demonstrate the fine line the saxophone walks from raw emotion to abominable cheesiness.’
      • ‘Karen Kohlhaas's direction plays wholeheartedly into the leaden preciosity of the text and manages to make an already dreadful play even more abominable.’
      • ‘The credit for the most abominable use or misuse of plastic carry bags goes to the political parties and their feeder organisations, for whom the flimsy bags are handy and cheap decorative material.’
      • ‘But that's all gone now and traffic is abominable.’
      • ‘Who could have constructed this abominable website?’
      substandard, poor, inferior, second-rate, second-class, unsatisfactory, inadequate, unacceptable, not up to scratch, not up to par, deficient, imperfect, defective, faulty, shoddy, amateurish, careless, negligent
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Origin

Middle English: via Old French from Latin abominabilis, from abominari (see abominate). The term was once widely believed to be from ab- ‘away from’ + Latin homine (from homo human being), thus inhuman, beastly, and frequently spelled abhominable until the 17th century.

Pronunciation:

abominable

/əˈbɒm(ə)nəb(ə)l/