Definition of abolition in English:

abolition

noun

  • [mass noun] The action of abolishing a system, practice, or institution:

    ‘the abolition of the death penalty’
    • ‘We are campaigning for the abolition of nuclear weapons and all other weapons of mass destruction.’
    • ‘They escaped the death penalty by only a couple of months as abolition took effect four weeks before their arrest.’
    • ‘The film caused huge debate in Poland and was at least partially instrumental in the abolition of the death penalty.’
    • ‘The imminent abolition of the current transfer system will only increase a worrying trend.’
    • ‘The abolition of apartheid restored the legitimacy of the South African state.’
    • ‘They have written to New Forest District Council and demanded the immediate abolition of the fees.’
    • ‘The party has also argued for abolition of the House of Lords and refused to take seats in it.’
    • ‘It also sought abolition of the roster system for the appointment of Urdu teachers.’
    • ‘The abolition of the means test is supported by the savings industry.’
    • ‘I agree with the suffrage of women, the abolition of torture and so on.’
    • ‘The abolition of small courtesies leads inevitably to grosser aggression.’
    • ‘The age discrimination law will mean the total abolition of the retirement age.’
    • ‘One of the proposals in the original draft dropped by the government was the abolition of the president's office.’
    • ‘Why not select several limited but hated taxes, totalling a few billion, and earmark them for abolition?’
    • ‘Among the major parties abolition of faith schools is inconceivable because they are too popular.’
    • ‘The abolition of polling stations means that people cannot be guaranteed the right to vote in privacy and security.’
    • ‘The abolition of most grammar schools kicked away the ladder for children from poorer backgrounds.’
    • ‘Indeed I think the complexity of the system alone is reason for its abolition.’
    • ‘The abolition of all prescription charges and home care charges for the disabled will also be of direct benefit.’
    • ‘The public wanted to retain the death penalty; parliament decreed its abolition.’
    scrapping, ending, stopping, doing away with, termination, eradication, elimination, extermination, destruction, annihilation, obliteration, quashing, extirpation
    annulment, cancellation, invalidation, nullification, dissolution
    revocation, repeal, rescindment, overturning, discontinuation, removal, withdrawal, retraction, countermanding, excising, vitiation, abrogation
    axing, ditching, junking, scrubbing, dumping, chopping
    deracination, rescission
    View synonyms

Origin

Early 16th century: from Latin abolitio(n-), from abolere destroy.

Pronunciation:

abolition

/abəˈlɪʃ(ə)n/