Definition of aboard in English:

aboard

adverb & preposition

  • 1On or into (a ship, aircraft, train, or other vehicle)

    [as adverb] ‘the plane crashed, killing all 158 people aboard’
    figurative ‘he came aboard as IBM's new chairman’
    [as preposition] ‘I climbed aboard the yacht’
    • ‘Most rail passengers felt uneasy as they climbed aboard their first train after the Paddington disaster.’
    • ‘At the end of the ceremony at sea, a further eight bells were sounded to mark the end of the watch aboard ship - and the first commemoration of the disaster.’
    • ‘When the tender is safely alongside the ship, climb aboard when the coxswain tells you to.’
    • ‘Here he climbs aboard the ‘longest train in the world’, breaking his journey at Chinguetti.’
    • ‘Pallets are delivered to the aircraft via track-driven vehicles, then pulled aboard using a winch.’
    • ‘Victor also saw action aboard many other ships including the aircraft carrier Shah in the Far East, but to him the Exeter was the most special.’
    • ‘I climb aboard the train a minute or two before it pulls out of the station and find to my horror that my seat is taken.’
    • ‘I awakened before dawn aboard a cruise ship in Warnamunde, Germany, an unheralded port along the Baltic Sea.’
    • ‘She climbed aboard the train and soon it took off for Yorkshire.’
    • ‘He climbed aboard the aircraft, started the engines, and was cleared for takeoff.’
    • ‘Gay and lesbian travelers are welcome aboard cruise ships, and they are among the most enthusiastic cruisers around.’
    • ‘Perhaps the customers have magically climbed aboard a ship.’
    • ‘Mary Campion gave a spellbinding talk at our April meeting, describing her terrifying experience aboard the cruise ship Jupiter and how it changed her life.’
    • ‘The balloon began losing helium during inflation aboard the launch ship Triton, around 20 miles off St Ives, west Cornwall.’
    • ‘On this day 390 years ago, the great explorer Sir Francis Drake died aboard ship off the coast of Panama.’
    • ‘You hoist yourself into the front seat like a driver climbing aboard an old steam train.’
    • ‘Passengers aboard the packed train said about five miles outside Newbridge, the train driver began to blow his horn loudly and then braked hard.’
    • ‘Today, Irish Rail says there is no smoking aboard trains.’
    • ‘The fire aboard the ship worsened and men climbed into lifeboats.’
    • ‘A container, the sort used to ship cargo across oceans and aboard trains, became Vienna's emblem last summer.’
    1. 1.1On or on to (a horse)
      [as adverb] ‘with Richard Migliore aboard, he won the cup at a gallop’
      • ‘The stewards found that the racecourse had been used as a training ground and that the rider, Timmy Murphy, had made insufficient effort aboard the horse.’
      • ‘Other notable triumphs were three wins aboard Zuhair in the Charlton Stakes at Goodwood, a race now named in the horse's honour.’
      • ‘The Raven Run was the third time Bridgmohan had teamed up with For All We Know, and his second win aboard the chestnut filly.’
      • ‘O'Dwyer was expecting to be aboard the horse in the final race of the festival, the County Hurdle on the Thursday.’
      • ‘The Downptarick pilot won the Grand National aboard Lord Gyllene in 1997 and has also finished second in two Cheltenham Gold Cup races.’
      • ‘His last win was aboard a horse called Volvo at Punchestown.’
      • ‘Five races later, McCarron added to his total with a win aboard Nepenthe in the Waya Handicap.’
      • ‘Darryll Holland also showed how to win from the front aboard Barbajuan in the Iveco Daily Solario Stakes.’
      • ‘Before last Sunday week his biggest win came aboard Eva Luna in the Heinz 57 at Leopardstown in 1994.’
      • ‘Reid won the race aboard Via De Lago in a close finish over Alf Matthews, another racing commentator, on Horricks.’
      • ‘Troopers aboard untried war horses simply had no chance against heavily armored tank divisions.’
      • ‘Photo number two shows local postman Owen McDonald aboard his horse and cart driving up Ballymanus Terrace.’
      • ‘Willie Supple can win aboard Sky Quest in the Eastern Festival Handicap over a distance just short of a mile and a half.’
      • ‘He is named aboard four horses in three races on the ten-race program at Saratoga Race Course.’
      • ‘The date is March of this year and Carrie Ford has the most realistic chance handed to a woman of winning the Grand National aboard Forest Gunner.’
      • ‘He has already won in Limerick on his other horse Ballytobin and aboard Kilcrea Shyan in Listowel two years ago.’
      • ‘Among Taylor's wins was a victory aboard Bridal Gal in the New Braunfels Stakes on September 17.’
      • ‘It was to be the high point of a wonderful day for Walsh, who won the Grand National at Aintree aboard his father, Ted's, horse, Papillon, two years ago.’
      • ‘He broke in at Sunland Park in New Mexico and won aboard his first mount, Fetch, in 1974.’
      • ‘In the concluding 11 furlong race, Spencer will be aboard Mickmacmagooole, trained in Ireland by Seamus O'Donnell.’
    2. 1.2Baseball
      On base.
      [as adverb] ‘putting their first batter aboard’
      • ‘The jerk came up to bat looking grim and manly and got aboard with a bloop grounder down the third-base line.’
      • ‘The Reds nudged and shouldered at the lead, putting their first batter aboard in the third, fourth, and fifth innings but never quite bringing him around.’
      • ‘In the bottom of the fifth, the Kikuyus added an insurance run when Harold got aboard on an error and Demetrius slapped a routine grounder that went under the shortstop's glove and past the left fielder.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from a- (expressing motion) + board, reinforced by Old French à bord.

Pronunciation:

aboard

/əˈbɔːd/