Definition of aboard in English:

aboard

adverb & preposition

  • 1On or into (a ship, aircraft, train, or other vehicle)

    as adverb ‘the plane crashed, killing all 158 people aboard’
    figurative ‘he came aboard as IBM's new chairman’
    as preposition ‘I climbed aboard the yacht’
    • ‘Victor also saw action aboard many other ships including the aircraft carrier Shah in the Far East, but to him the Exeter was the most special.’
    • ‘Gay and lesbian travelers are welcome aboard cruise ships, and they are among the most enthusiastic cruisers around.’
    • ‘Here he climbs aboard the ‘longest train in the world’, breaking his journey at Chinguetti.’
    • ‘Perhaps the customers have magically climbed aboard a ship.’
    • ‘A container, the sort used to ship cargo across oceans and aboard trains, became Vienna's emblem last summer.’
    • ‘At the end of the ceremony at sea, a further eight bells were sounded to mark the end of the watch aboard ship - and the first commemoration of the disaster.’
    • ‘On this day 390 years ago, the great explorer Sir Francis Drake died aboard ship off the coast of Panama.’
    • ‘I awakened before dawn aboard a cruise ship in Warnamunde, Germany, an unheralded port along the Baltic Sea.’
    • ‘You hoist yourself into the front seat like a driver climbing aboard an old steam train.’
    • ‘Pallets are delivered to the aircraft via track-driven vehicles, then pulled aboard using a winch.’
    • ‘Mary Campion gave a spellbinding talk at our April meeting, describing her terrifying experience aboard the cruise ship Jupiter and how it changed her life.’
    • ‘The balloon began losing helium during inflation aboard the launch ship Triton, around 20 miles off St Ives, west Cornwall.’
    • ‘Today, Irish Rail says there is no smoking aboard trains.’
    • ‘Most rail passengers felt uneasy as they climbed aboard their first train after the Paddington disaster.’
    • ‘Passengers aboard the packed train said about five miles outside Newbridge, the train driver began to blow his horn loudly and then braked hard.’
    • ‘She climbed aboard the train and soon it took off for Yorkshire.’
    • ‘When the tender is safely alongside the ship, climb aboard when the coxswain tells you to.’
    • ‘The fire aboard the ship worsened and men climbed into lifeboats.’
    • ‘He climbed aboard the aircraft, started the engines, and was cleared for takeoff.’
    • ‘I climb aboard the train a minute or two before it pulls out of the station and find to my horror that my seat is taken.’
    1. 1.1 On or on to (a horse)
      as adverb ‘with Richard Migliore aboard, he won the cup at a gallop’
      • ‘In the concluding 11 furlong race, Spencer will be aboard Mickmacmagooole, trained in Ireland by Seamus O'Donnell.’
      • ‘The stewards found that the racecourse had been used as a training ground and that the rider, Timmy Murphy, had made insufficient effort aboard the horse.’
      • ‘He is named aboard four horses in three races on the ten-race program at Saratoga Race Course.’
      • ‘Among Taylor's wins was a victory aboard Bridal Gal in the New Braunfels Stakes on September 17.’
      • ‘Photo number two shows local postman Owen McDonald aboard his horse and cart driving up Ballymanus Terrace.’
      • ‘He has already won in Limerick on his other horse Ballytobin and aboard Kilcrea Shyan in Listowel two years ago.’
      • ‘Other notable triumphs were three wins aboard Zuhair in the Charlton Stakes at Goodwood, a race now named in the horse's honour.’
      • ‘His last win was aboard a horse called Volvo at Punchestown.’
      • ‘Troopers aboard untried war horses simply had no chance against heavily armored tank divisions.’
      • ‘The date is March of this year and Carrie Ford has the most realistic chance handed to a woman of winning the Grand National aboard Forest Gunner.’
      • ‘It was to be the high point of a wonderful day for Walsh, who won the Grand National at Aintree aboard his father, Ted's, horse, Papillon, two years ago.’
      • ‘He broke in at Sunland Park in New Mexico and won aboard his first mount, Fetch, in 1974.’
      • ‘The Raven Run was the third time Bridgmohan had teamed up with For All We Know, and his second win aboard the chestnut filly.’
      • ‘Before last Sunday week his biggest win came aboard Eva Luna in the Heinz 57 at Leopardstown in 1994.’
      • ‘The Downptarick pilot won the Grand National aboard Lord Gyllene in 1997 and has also finished second in two Cheltenham Gold Cup races.’
      • ‘Willie Supple can win aboard Sky Quest in the Eastern Festival Handicap over a distance just short of a mile and a half.’
      • ‘O'Dwyer was expecting to be aboard the horse in the final race of the festival, the County Hurdle on the Thursday.’
      • ‘Five races later, McCarron added to his total with a win aboard Nepenthe in the Waya Handicap.’
      • ‘Darryll Holland also showed how to win from the front aboard Barbajuan in the Iveco Daily Solario Stakes.’
      • ‘Reid won the race aboard Via De Lago in a close finish over Alf Matthews, another racing commentator, on Horricks.’
    2. 1.2Baseball On base as a runner.
      as adverb ‘putting their first batter aboard’
      • ‘In the bottom of the fifth, the Kikuyus added an insurance run when Harold got aboard on an error and Demetrius slapped a routine grounder that went under the shortstop's glove and past the left fielder.’
      • ‘The Reds nudged and shouldered at the lead, putting their first batter aboard in the third, fourth, and fifth innings but never quite bringing him around.’
      • ‘The jerk came up to bat looking grim and manly and got aboard with a bloop grounder down the third-base line.’

Phrases

  • all aboard!

    • A call warning passengers to get on a ship, train, or bus that is about to depart.

      • ‘It's all aboard the Air Train to Denver International Airport - even though passengers won't be loading luggage for another 10 years.’
      • ‘Alright, all aboard for a time gone by, when narrow pants, octagonal shades, big round hair and teardrop peace medallions were the now thing!’
      • ‘All aboard the sleepy train to visit Mother Goose.’
      • ‘Australia G'day Sports! All aboard for the Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea!’
      • ‘Gorgeous Georgetown: all aboard for a rail and driving adventure in mountain mining country near Denver.’
      • ‘Then it's all aboard to see the royal beds (yes, singles; separate rooms), the portable Rolls-Royce Phantom, and the surprisingly naff 1950s furniture.’
      • ‘Ahmed takes us to a new and far and unventured land full of history where the locals are quite friendly, all aboard for Penrith!’
      • ‘When you've seen all you need to, it's all aboard, and settle back for the next section of the journey.’
      • ‘It is all aboard for the 7.45 pm Gravesend Railway Enthusiasts Society meeting on July 30.’
      • ‘Then it was all aboard for a first-class morning flight to Manchester.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from a- (expressing motion) + board, reinforced by Old French à bord.

Pronunciation

aboard

/əˈbɔːd/