Definition of abhor in English:

abhor

verbabhors, abhorred, abhorring

[with object]
  • Regard with disgust and hatred.

    ‘he abhorred sexism in every form’
    • ‘Just as nature abhors a vacuum, the city cannot abide a void.’
    • ‘I'm one of those people who is always on time, and abhors lateness.’
    • ‘Our organisation abhors this kind of act and appeals to residents to be vigilant and watch out for any suspicious goings-on.’
    • ‘He is a driven man who abhors the notion that sport is not about the winning, but the taking part.’
    • ‘It also means sitting down with someone, someone who is not abhorred or hated, to have a conversation.’
    • ‘He abhors the fast food culture and, as a student, can't understand why many of his peers are content to be couch potatoes.’
    • ‘The conservation officer is very pragmatic: she supports legalized and controlled hunting, but abhors poachers.’
    • ‘But politics, like nature, abhors a vacuum and it stands to reason that there must be a vacancy for a party of the right in Scotland, just as in every other European nation.’
    • ‘Strong words indeed for a fellow who abhors political smear and accuses others of engaging in it!’
    • ‘Inside every one of us lies a Puritan streak which abhors anything smacking of frivolity or done for the sheer joy of it.’
    • ‘The president abhors dissent and is totally dismissive not only of dissenters, but also of the people's right to dissent.’
    • ‘Charles, God bless him, abhors violence and loves dialogue.’
    • ‘They come under his jurisdiction, it is true, but he personally abhors those acts.’
    • ‘However, it obviously cannot involve either, because the university is famously progressive, and hence abhors both sins.’
    • ‘Healthcare professionals abhor politicians' interference in the NHS.’
    • ‘What he meant was that the truly pious individual cannot be sectarian because Islam like other religions abhors sectarianism.’
    • ‘I make this prediction based on what we know about biology, which is that natures abhors uniformity.’
    • ‘He abhors anything that adds to the cost of doing business, and politicians who show insufficient urgency about tackling the wider threats to business.’
    • ‘She's prone to plain speaking and abhors hype, so she's admittedly uncomfortable with self-promotion.’
    • ‘He abhors footballers becoming TV presenters.’
    hate, loathe, despise, abominate, execrate, regard with disgust, feel disgust for, feel repugnance towards, feel distaste for, shrink from, recoil from, shudder at, be unable to bear, be unable to abide, feel hostility to, feel aversion to, feel animosity to, find intolerable, dislike, disdain, have an aversion to
    detest, hate, loathe, despise, abominate, execrate, regard with disgust, shrink from, recoil from, shudder at, be unable to bear, be unable to abide, feel aversion to, feel hostility to, find intolerable, dislike, disdain, have an aversion to
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin abhorrere, from ab- ‘away from’ + horrere ‘to shudder’.

Pronunciation

abhor

/əbˈhɔː/