Definition of abduct in English:

abduct

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Take (someone) away illegally by force or deception; kidnap.

    ‘the millionaire who disappeared may have been abducted’
    • ‘Families who want to marry off their daughters without paying a dowry often hire criminals to abduct eligible boys and force them into wedlock, the paper said.’
    • ‘They said that children who tried to escape were usually captured by other abducted children.’
    • ‘Even if it was a mistake to abduct her children following the trial, the children should not be punished for her mistake.’
    • ‘Traffickers also kidnap and abduct their victims.’
    • ‘To prove loyalty to the cause, abducted children are often forced to kill family members or each other.’
    • ‘There is a pattern of arbitrary executions, the systematic rape of women and girls and people being abducted.’
    • ‘So, after he is abducted, he is forced to wander, looking for a community where he can settle.’
    • ‘A WOMAN abducted by a knifeman in a busy Bolton street and forced to drive to Leeds was today recovering at home.’
    • ‘This was the second time for the rebels to set free abducted members of security forces in recent weeks.’
    • ‘During one such break-in, they find themselves forced to abduct him and take him into the mountains.’
    • ‘A new law took effect last year that makes it illegal to abduct young girls and force them into marriage.’
    • ‘A woman who alleged she was abducted and raped is no longer helping detectives investigating the attack.’
    • ‘You hear about people abducting kids all the time.’
    • ‘The arrest was a seizure by seven armed men dressed in civilian clothes who abducted him in an unlicensed car.’
    • ‘Have you ever noticed that when people are abducted it's usually during the night, Art?’
    • ‘A failed attempt to abduct a legislator's son came to light yesterday, sending shock waves though the legislature's staff.’
    • ‘But what possible motive would a person have for abducting Mike?’
    • ‘He has a string of prior convictions and was arrested and was later convicted of abducting a prostitute and threatening to kill her.’
    • ‘It has been alleged that the person who attempted to abduct the girl was a serving member of the force.’
    • ‘Young men with poor marriage prospects might attempt to abduct a woman and force her into marriage.’
    carry off, capture, seize, snatch, hold to ransom, take as hostage, hijack
    View synonyms
  • 2Physiology
    (of a muscle) move (a limb or part) away from the midline of the body or from another part.

    ‘the posterior rectus muscle, which abducts the eye’
    The opposite of adduct
    • ‘The gluteus medius and minimus abduct and rotate the hip internally.’
    • ‘The dorsal interossei abduct the toes from this axis.’
    • ‘The superior rectus and inferior rectus muscles abduct the eye.’
    • ‘In the shoulder girdle, the serratus anterior and pectoralis minor muscles contract to abduct the scapula on the up phase.’
    • ‘When the arm is abducted and externally rotated the sternocostal fibres are maximally stretched.’

Origin

Early 17th century: from Latin abduct- led away, from the verb abducere, from ab- away, from + ducere to lead.

Pronunciation:

abduct

/əbˈdʌkt/