Definition of a rush of blood (to the head) in English:

a rush of blood (to the head)

phrase

  • A sudden attack of wild irrationality.

    ‘what lost us the match was a rush of blood to the head when they had the man sent off’
    • ‘Buildings go up in a rush of blood only to be pulled down a few years later.’
    • ‘However, having done the hard bit, the former Aberdeenshire skipper suffered a rush of blood to the head which saw him race down the track to Baird, only to misjudge the flight and find himself comprehensively bowled.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, the veteran had a rush of blood to the head and skied his shot high over the Jail End enclosure.’
    • ‘Speaking after the decision, Hughes said: ‘This isn't a rush of blood to the head, we have taken two years to look at the evidence.’’
    • ‘All of a sudden, late last year, the Minister had a rush of blood to the head.’
    • ‘And no - this wasn't a rush of blood to the head after last week's budget - it was in fact the town's Christmas concert, which didn't leave a scrape of talent to spare with everyone getting involved in its production.’
    • ‘Getting a rush of blood to the head and trying to force through projects by executive fiat can, and will, backfire.’
    • ‘I don't plan to go there (I hate Stamford Bridge's away end and it's on the telly) unless I have a rush of blood to the head later in the week.’
    • ‘‘It was pretty much a rush of blood to the head,’ admitted Mrs Peat.’
    • ‘After that, it was a rush of blood to the head and a swift handing-over of the Amex - a sin of impulse quickly committed but never regretted for a moment since.’