Definition of à outrance in English:

à outrance

adverb

literary
  • To the death or the very end.

    ‘a duel à outrance’
    • ‘And, they believed that it had to be taken seriously, and fought à outrance, with everything they had.’
    • ‘The author explains didactically but also with discreet and captivating British humour what she means by Desperado literature: she means a literary space where all writers use à outrance all literary tricks ever devised, in order to be different, to shock at all costs, to become their own trend.’
    • ‘As it turned out, it came at the beginning of a rhetorical guerre à outrance over the reputation of the former pope which, like some grim battle of attrition, has not abated even after 40 years.’
    • ‘Now anyone but a contrarian might suppose that Verdun and Vichy were at opposite poles, the first being resistance à outrance to foreign domination and the second being craven acquiescence in same.’
    • ‘Wheeling away from a committed charge was the mass equivalent of dodging a punch, and in Crusade engagements the Turks would often frustrate the European desire for battle à outrance.’

Origin

French, literally ‘to the utmost’.

Pronunciation

à outrance

/a utʀɑ̃s//ɑː ˈuːtrɒ̃s/