Definition of a deal of in English:

a deal of

phrase

dated
  • A large amount of.

    ‘he lost a deal of blood’
    • ‘It's true, too, for there's been a deal of coughing and spluttering.’
    • ‘Other forces have experimented with dealing with complainants in a much more timely way, and a less bureaucratic way, so there has been a deal of innovation.’
    • ‘Graham is happily pottering about the house and gardens, doing the light jobs, and a deal of his time is freeing up, leaving him at liberty to pursue other interests.’
    • ‘I have a deal of filing to do and I'm sure that while I'm doing that I shall uncover a few routine domestic jobs I've put aside out of inclination or irritation.’
    • ‘I have learned a deal of what I know about the resourcefulness of my own language from the prophets.’
    • ‘Meanwhile drugs squad officers seized E1000 of ecstasy, cannabis and a deal of what is believed to be cocaine in a raid on a house in the Crozon area of the city.’
    • ‘I'm sad to see the last of the poppies, and I feel a deal of sympathy with the plants that are suffering under the drought, but I'm also enjoying the sun.’
    • ‘It's just that, late in the evening, I'm having a deal of a problem recalling what, if anything, happened this morning.’
    • ‘It's a warm, snug little house, and there's a deal of sense in our sitting back and enjoying it in its fully finished state for a while before moving on.’
    • ‘There was quite a deal of evidence that that amount of money was by no means unusual so far as his situation was concerned.’
    • ‘I think he has a deal of generosity in his nature, judging by the way he trots over to his mate to present her with any specially juicy bug he may find, so perhaps he wishes me well, too.’
    • ‘This student and the hairstyle which got him excluded from school has created a deal of interest’
    • ‘That's what they say, and there's a deal of truth in it.’
    • ‘The verdict of the committee will carry a deal of weight at Westminster, where it is regarded as a heavyweight body.’
    • ‘Luckily, on the evidence of this dire Wednesday performance, he will spend a deal of the winter in Pakistan and will be unable to accept the offer.’
    • ‘There's a deal of writing and talking about the mid-life crisis.’
    • ‘Another good way to describe my day, because there's been a deal of quiet smiling and contentment but precious little new growth.’
    • ‘It would certainly cost the banks a deal of nuisance and lost employee hours.’
    • ‘Even if the police had the resources to follow beggars around with video cameras, it is debatable whether this extra evidence would make a deal of difference.’
    • ‘He seemed a bit upset, naturally enough, and spent a deal of time rubbing or wringing his hands while the police talked to him.’