Definition of a chip off the old block in English:

a chip off the old block

phrase

informal
  • Someone who resembles their parent in character or appearance:

    ‘she smiled at Jimmy, a chip off the old block with his grey eyes and a bit of his dad's twinkle’
    • ‘He might even turn out to be a chip off the old block.’
    • ‘Daniel '71, Ph.D. '78 (early Islamic history), is what old-timers would call a chip off the old block.’
    • ‘She was also developing an expensive, hedonistic lifestyle, proving she was a chip off the old block, and she graduated into a notorious celebrity.’
    • ‘Glen, of Lowther Crescent, Leyland, said it all happened so quickly, but is thrilled for Sam who is clearly a chip off the old block.’
    • ‘But the fly-half is a chip off the old block when it comes to meticulous planning and almost disturbing dedication to duty.’
    • ‘If young Les proves to be a chip off the old block, then Workers are, indeed, in good hands.’
    • ‘Martin is literally a chip off the old block and carries on the family tradition not just by chops but also by manufacturing top quality racing axes.’
    • ‘And he's a brick, a chip off the old block, a good ‘un.’
    • ‘Somebody looked at me, then at my father and decided, ‘He's a chip off the old block.’’
    • ‘He certainly is a chip off the old block - he not only bears a striking resemblance to his father but also moves very much like him.’
    • ‘Son has worked with father since his teens and, by all accounts, is definitely a chip off the old block for, like his dad, Chris is ‘a practical guy’.’
    • ‘Is his son a chip off the old block in interest in international affairs?’
    • ‘Scott had taken Sean's promotion at the law firm, and Mr. Sinclair had no doubt in his mind that Brandon was a chip off the old block.’
    • ‘I didn't know she had it in her… but perhaps she's more of a chip off the old block than I gave her credit for.’
    • ‘Renowned as a playboy who has dated a string of Indonesian starlets, Tommy is, as the saying goes, a chip off the old block.’
    • ‘And five years after that reunion, there is no doubt now that Ford is very much a chip off the old block.’
    • ‘Yes, perhaps Ferry is a chip off the old block after all.’
    • ‘He claims his inheritance, transforms his arid lands into a lush and prosperous farm through an irrigation scheme, and is generally seen as a chip off the old block.’
    • ‘King Abdullah is a chip off the old block, really.’
    • ‘So, like a chip off the old block, I felt compelled to keep telling the story until someone graced me with a response.’