noun

mass nounNorth American
informal
  • An unpleasantly sticky or congealed substance.

    ‘she scrubbed the ick off the back of the stove’
    • ‘We have to take up the soggy vinyl flooring, clean up the ick and dry everything out.’
    • ‘His hair was so blond it was almost white and his eyes were such an electric shade of blue that Kae was sure that direct eye contact would fry you to a complete crisp… or cause you to melt into a puddle of ick.’
    • ‘After a week of struggling with this godawful sinusy chest congestion ick, I gave up and called in sick this morning.’
    • ‘The imagery gives off a strange tactile sensation: You can feel the damp cold, smell the rotting flesh, and you'll often be compelled to take a shower afterwards to scrub off the ick.’
    • ‘I have to now face the fact that I, who am rarely sick, have been sickish for a week now, mostly with coughing phlegmy runny nose-and-eyes ick.’
    • ‘The figure of the clown, freighted with goo and ick, essentially embodies kitsch.’
    • ‘But the mess - the puddles of gunky congealing ick getting into a soldier's boots and running down inside the socks.’
    • ‘I've been fighting off some sort of picked-up-on-the-return-flights respiratory ick, but I seem to be winning.’
    • ‘Producing a handkerchief from my pocket I dabbed at her face, removing the worst of the ick.’
    • ‘‘He's a demon, as you can see from his blood,’ - he motioned toward the black ick.’